Shane Woolf

Sign in to Goodreads to learn more about Shane.


Add as a Friend Follow Reviews   Send Message | Compare Books


Gathering Blue
Shane Woolf is currently reading
by Lois Lowry (Goodreads Author)
bookshelves: currently-reading
Rate this book
Clear rating

 
The Giver
Shane Woolf is currently reading
by Lois Lowry (Goodreads Author)
bookshelves: currently-reading
Rate this book
Clear rating

 
The Voyage of the...
Rate this book
Clear rating

progress: 
 
  (page 68 of 248)
Aug 21, 2011 07:58PM

 
See all 7 books that Shane is reading…

Shane's Recent Updates

Shane Woolf is now friends with Mark Williams
49723118
Shane Woolf and 344 other people liked Ellen's review of Wuthering Heights:
Wuthering Heights by Emily Brontë
"I never expected this book to be as flagrantly, unforgivably bad as it was.

To start, Bronte's technical choice of narrating the story of the primary characters by having the housekeeper explain everything to a tenant 20 years after it happened com..." Read more of this review »
Shane Woolf wants to read
Son by Lois Lowry
Son (The Giver Quartet, #4)
by Lois Lowry (Goodreads Author)
Rate this book
Clear rating
Shane Woolf wants to read
Messenger by Lois Lowry
Messenger (The Giver, #3)
by Lois Lowry (Goodreads Author)
Rate this book
Clear rating
Shane Woolf is currently reading
Gathering Blue by Lois Lowry
Rate this book
Clear rating
Shane Woolf is currently reading
The Giver by Lois Lowry
The Giver (The Giver, #1)
by Lois Lowry (Goodreads Author)
Rate this book
Clear rating
Shane Woolf added Goodreads to his Facebook Timeline
Goodreads for Timeline
Add your books to Timeline!
Learn More
Shane Woolf rated a book really liked it
Mockingjay by Suzanne Collins
Rate this book
Clear rating
Shane Woolf rated a book liked it
Catching Fire by Suzanne Collins
Rate this book
Clear rating
More of Shane's books…
Douglas Adams
“Far out in the uncharted backwaters of the unfashionable end of the western spiral arm of the Galaxy lies a small unregarded yellow sun. Orbiting this at a distance of roughly ninety-two million miles is an utterly insignificant little blue green planet whose ape-descended life forms are so amazingly primitive that they still think digital watches are a pretty neat idea.”
Douglas Adams, The Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy

Neil Postman
“We were keeping our eye on 1984. When the year came and the prophecy didn't, thoughtful Americans sang softly in praise of themselves. The roots of liberal democracy had held. Wherever else the terror had happened, we, at least, had not been visited by Orwellian nightmares.

But we had forgotten that alongside Orwell's dark vision, there was another - slightly older, slightly less well known, equally chilling: Aldous Huxley's Brave New World. Contrary to common belief even among the educated, Huxley and Orwell did not prophesy the same thing. Orwell warns that we will be overcome by an externally imposed oppression. But in Huxley's vision, no Big Brother is required to deprive people of their autonomy, maturity and history. As he saw it, people will come to love their oppression, to adore the technologies that undo their capacities to think.

What Orwell feared were those who would ban books. What Huxley feared was that there would be no reason to ban a book, for there would be no one who wanted to read one. Orwell feared those who would deprive us of information. Huxley feared those who would give us so much that we would be reduced to passivity and egoism. Orwell feared that the truth would be concealed from us. Huxley feared the truth would be drowned in a sea of irrelevance. Orwell feared we would become a captive culture. Huxley feared we would become a trivial culture, preoccupied with some equivalent of the feelies, the orgy porgy, and the centrifugal bumblepuppy. As Huxley remarked in Brave New World Revisited, the civil libertarians and rationalists who are ever on the alert to oppose tyranny "failed to take into account man's almost infinite appetite for distractions." In 1984, Orwell added, people are controlled by inflicting pain. In Brave New World, they are controlled by inflicting pleasure. In short, Orwell feared that what we fear will ruin us. Huxley feared that what we desire will ruin us.

This book is about the possibility that Huxley, not Orwell, was right.”
Neil Postman, Amusing Ourselves to Death: Public Discourse in the Age of Show Business

George Orwell
“War is peace.
Freedom is slavery.
Ignorance is strength.”
George Orwell, 1984

Philip Caputo
“Anyone who does not acknowledge the darkness in his nature will succumb to it...the lamp of conviction needs to be shaded by doubt, or it burns with a blinding light.”
Philip Caputo

George Orwell
“Perhaps a lunatic was simply a minority of one.”
George Orwell, 1984

Mark Wi...
2 books | 5 friends

Cathi Jo
534 books | 110 friends

Amanda ...
151 books | 141 friends

Cynthia...
1 book | 63 friends

Becca T...
95 books | 71 friends

Kimmie ...
2 books | 7 friends

Sandy Pool
2 books | 54 friends

Rebecca
480 books | 172 friends

More friends…
The Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy by Douglas Adams
Best Young Adult Books
10,219 books — 69,098 voters


Quizzes and Trivia

questions answered:
2 (0.0%)

correct:
2 (100.0%)

skipped:
0 (0.0%)

1429183 out of 3978565

streak:
2

best streak:
2

questions added:
0



Polls voted on by Shane

Lists liked by Shane