Kerrie Curzon’s Profile

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I Capture the Castle
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Complete Fairy Tales
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Kerrie Curzon wants to read
Lilith by George MacDonald
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Phantastes by George MacDonald
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The Princess and Curdie by George MacDonald
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The Lilac Fairy Book - Folio Society Edition by Andrew Lang
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The Crimson Fairy Book - Folio Society Edition by Andrew Lang
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The Violet Fairy Book - Folio Society Edition by Andrew Lang
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The Grey Fairy Book - Folio Society Edition by Andrew Lang
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The Brown Fairy Book - Folio Society Edition by Andrew Lang
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The Orange Fairy Book - Folio Society Edition by Andrew Lang
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The Pink Fairy Book - Folio Society Edition by Andrew Lang
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More of Kerrie's books…
Herman Melville
“How it is I know not; but there is no place like a bed for confidential disclosures between friends. Man and wife, they say, there open the very bottom of their souls to each other; and some old couples often lie and chat over old times till nearly morning. Thus, then, in our hearts' honeymoon, lay I and Queequeg - a cosy, loving pair.”
Herman Melville, Moby-Dick; or, The Whale

Charlotte Brontë
“To talk to each other is but a more animated and an audible thinking.”
Charlotte Brontë, Jane Eyre

Herman Melville
“Is it that by its indefiniteness it shadows forth the heartless voids and immensities of the universe, and thus stabs us from behind with the thought of annihilation, when beholding the white depths of the milky way? Or is it, that as in essence whiteness is not so much a color as the visible absence of color; and at the same time the concrete of all colors; is it for these reasons that there is such a dumb blankness, full of meaning, in a wide landscape of snows- a colorless, all-color of atheism from which we shrink? And when we consider that other theory of the natural philosophers, that all other earthly hues — every stately or lovely emblazoning — the sweet tinges of sunset skies and woods; yea, and the gilded velvets of butterflies, and the butterfly cheeks of young girls; all these are but subtile deceits, not actually inherent in substances, but only laid on from without; so that all deified Nature absolutely paints like the harlot, whose allurements cover nothing but the charnel-house within; and when we proceed further, and consider that the mystical cosmetic which produces every one of her hues, the great principle of light, for ever remains white or colorless in itself, and if operating without medium upon matter, would touch all objects, even tulips and roses, with its own blank tinge — pondering all this, the palsied universe lies before us a leper; and like wilful travellers in Lapland, who refuse to wear colored and coloring glasses upon their eyes, so the wretched infidel gazes himself blind at the monumental white shroud that wraps all the prospect around him. And of all these things the Albino whale was the symbol. Wonder ye then at the fiery hunt?”
Herman Melville, Moby-Dick; or, The Whale

Herman Melville
“for there is no folly of the beast of the earth which is not infinitely outdone by the madness of men ”
Herman Melville, Moby Dick

Herman Melville
“If I had been downright honest with myself, I would have seen very plainly in my heart that I did but half fancy being committed this way to so long a voyage, without once laying my eyes on the man who was to be the absolute dictator of it, so soon as the ship sailed out upon the open sea. But when a man suspects any wrong, it sometimes happens that if he be already involved in the matter, he insensibly strives to cover up his suspicions even from himself. And much this way it was with me. I said nothing, and tried to think nothing.”
Herman Melville, Moby-Dick; or, The Whale

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