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The Knowledge of ...
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The Story of Chri...
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  (page 105 of 528)
Aug 27, 2015 12:30AM

 
Bread for the Jou...
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Alex's Recent Updates

Alex Stroshine wants to read
Selling Spirituality by Jeremy Carrette
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Alex Stroshine wants to read
Capitalizing Religion by Craig Martin
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Heavenly Participation by Hans Boersma
Idiot Psalms by Scott Cairns
Idiot Psalms: New Poems
by Scott Cairns
read in August, 2015
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Alex Stroshine started reading
The Knowledge of the Holy by A.W. Tozer
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The Gifts of the Small Church by Jason Byassee
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Lately I've been wondering if I should change churches. I miss the monthly luncheon my childhood church hosted; it let you get to know people. My church, my city, my age demographic, is marked by fleeting transience. And the church I currently attend ...more
Alex Stroshine is on page 105 of 528 of The Story of Christianity
The Story of Christianity by Justo L. González
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Why We Disagree about Climate Change by Mike Hulme
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More of Alex's books…
“Dialogue with Catholics and other nonevangelical Christians offered some correction to the Church Growth movement's fixation on cultural accommodation and baptism rates. However - save for those few who converted - evangelicals attracted to other Christian traditions have made those traditions their own. They assemble do-it-yourself liturgies from a hodgepodge of monastic prayers and mystics' visions. They lionize medieval dissenters - Celtic monks, or renegade Franciscans - but don't understand their broader Catholic context. Without quite realizing what they have done, evangelicals often use these ancient teachings and practices to confirm, rather than challenge, their own assumptions. History becomes a sidekick to one's twenty-first-century journey with Jesus.”
Molly Worthen, Apostles of Reason: The Crisis of Authority in American Evangelicalism

Jonathan Grant
“Although we should affirm the wonder and mystery of sexual intimacy and romantic attraction as God's good creations, we need to set these aesthetic enjoyments within the context of the Christian virtues of fidelity, self-sacrifice, and patience in suffering.

Bring this together, our pastoral approach should be double-edged, seeking to challenge our culture's worship of sexual desire and personal fulfillment while offering a different vision of human flourishing. Christian formative involves both RESISTANCE and REDIRECTION. But is is the redirection of our desires that enables our resistance of cultural idolatries. Failure to attend to the dynamics of our desires leads to inevitable self-deception regarding the 'freedom' of our actions. Especially within our sexual lives, our hearts must be truly captivated by the goodness of the Christian vision of life, so that our whole self is drawn toward it, or our commitment to live in tune with it will be brittle.”
Jonathan Grant, Divine Sex: A Compelling Vision for Christian Relationships in a Hypersexualized Age

Alexander Schmemann
“Once more, the joyful character of the eucharistic gathering must be stressed. For the medieval emphasis on the cross, while not a wrong one, is certainly one-sided. The liturgy is, before everything else, the joyous gathering of those who are to meet the risen Lord and to enter with him into the bridal chamber. And it is this joy of expectation and this expectation of joy that are expressed in singing and ritual, in vestments and in censing, in that whole 'beauty' of the liturgy which has so often been denounced as unnecessary and even sinful.

Unnecessary it is indeed, for we are beyond the categories of the 'necessary.' Beauty is never 'necessary,' 'functional' or 'useful.' And when, expecting someone whom we love, we put a beautiful tablecloth on the table and decorate it with candles and flowers, we do all this not out of necessity, but out of love. And the Church is love, expectation and joy.”
Alexander Schmemann, For the Life of the World: Sacraments and Orthodoxy

G.K. Chesterton
“To a Calvinist the most important thing was Calvinism; to a Puritan the most important thing was the Puritan creed; and this in itself certainly did not favor the vague sentiments either of emancipation or fraternity. Calvinism took away a man's liberty in the universe; why, then, should it favor his liberty in the State? Puritanism denied free will; why should it be likely to affirm free speech? Why should the Calvinist object to an aristocracy? The Calvinists were an aristocracy; they were the most arrogant and awful of aristocracies by the nature of their own belief: they were the elect. Why should the Puritans dislike a baby being born a nobleman? It was the whole philosophy of the Puritans that a baby is born a celestial nobleman; and he is at birth and before birth a member of the cosmic upper classes. It should have been a small matter to the Puritans to admit that one might be born a king, seeing that they maintained the much more paradoxical position that one might be born a saint. Nor is it easy to see upon their own ideal principles why the Puritans should have disliked despotism or arbitrary power; though it is certainly much more the fact that they did dislike despotism than that they did dislike oligarchy. The first conception of Calvinism is a fierce insistence on the utterly arbitrary nature of power. The King of the Cavaliers was certainly not so purely willful, so sublimely capricious a sultan, as the God of the Puritans.”
G.K. Chesterton

Martin E. Marty
“To give the whole store away to match what this year's market says the unchurched want is to have the people who know least about the faith determine most about its expression.”
Martin E. Marty

68984 Christian Theological/Philosophical Book Club — 617 members — last activity 1 hour, 10 min ago
Herein lies an accommodating location for Christian theists, and others, to read books and discuss the topics that pertain to the Faith. This group we ...more
53 Christian Readers — 3350 members — last activity Aug 26, 2015 08:07PM
This is an open forum for people to discuss Christ-themed books. Whether you'd like to discuss theology, biographies, church history, novels or anythi ...more
155 C. S. Lewis — 813 members — last activity Aug 17, 2015 10:33AM
For lovers of Clive Staples Lewis.
25x33 G.K. Chesterton Readers — 67 members — last activity Feb 13, 2015 06:46AM
For fans of the biggest writer of the twentieth century.
25x33 Regent College Alumni — 11 members — last activity Oct 12, 2008 09:45PM
Students past and present of Regent College in Vancouver, BC.
More of Alex’s groups…
Patricia
627 books | 32 friends

Jacob A...
1,477 books | 139 friends

Ashley ...
201 books | 355 friends

Bob
Bob
798 books | 416 friends

Brent M...
454 books | 77 friends

Bill
1,557 books | 209 friends

JB
JB
963 books | 363 friends

Charlie
864 books | 116 friends

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Arminian Theology by Roger E. OlsonThe Transforming Power of Grace by Thomas C. OdenAgainst Calvinism by Roger E. OlsonFreedom of the Will by Daniel D. WhedonPrevenient Grace by W Brian Shelton
Arminian Theology
18 books — 4 voters
Bad Religion by Ross DouthatNo Man Is an Island by Thomas MertonSurprised by Hope by N.T. WrightWhat's Wrong with the World by G.K. ChestertonPollution & the Death of Man by Francis A. Schaeffer
The Christian Intellect
514 books — 492 voters

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2013 Reading Challenge
Alex Stroshine
Alex Stroshine has completed his goal of reading 55 books for the 2013 Reading Challenge!
 
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2012 Reading Challenge
Alex Stroshine
Alex Stroshine has completed his goal of reading 25 books for the 2012 Reading Challenge!
 
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