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A Change of Heart...
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"insightful, gives honor and credit where they are due." Apr 25, 2015 09:49PM

 
White Whale
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Joy for the World...
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Feb 10, 2015 04:02AM

 

Mark's Recent Updates

Mark Ward is 14% done with A Change of Heart: insightful, gives honor and credit where they are due.
A Change of Heart by Thomas C. Oden
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Mark Ward is starting A Change of Heart: Excited about this book!
A Change of Heart by Thomas C. Oden
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Culture Making by Andy Crouch
Culture Making by Andy Crouch
Culture Making by Andy Crouch
Mark Ward rated a book 3 of 5 stars
What St Paul Really Said by Tom     Wright
What St Paul Really Said
by Tom Wright
read in January, 2003
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A review I wrote way back when at the beginning of my PhD work:

No one active in Pauline studies can afford to ignore Tom Wright and his contribution to the “New Perspective” on Paul. This is due not to his contribution to an orthodox understanding of
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Mark Ward rated a book 2 of 5 stars
The Chronology of the Life of Paul by George Ogg
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It takes only four pages of The Chronology of the Life of Paul to find out George Ogg’s perspective on the historicity and reliability of the Bible’s account of Paul’s life: “It seems very likely that the words, ‘and when they were condemned to death ...more
Mark Ward rated a book 3 of 5 stars
The Mystery and Meaning of the Dead Sea Scrolls by Hershel Shanks
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Hershel Shanks, editor of the glossy Biblical Archaeology Review, presents a fascinating historical account in the opening chapters of The Mystery and Meaning of the Dead Sea Scrolls, made all the more interesting due to his personal involvement in t ...more
Mark Ward rated a book 4 of 5 stars
An Introduction to the Apocrypha by Bruce M. Metzger
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Bruce Metzger’s Introduction to the Apocrypha is an excellent summary of the contents and provenance of a complicated set of historical documents. He sets forth no real thesis, save perhaps that he does not consider the Apocryphal books as part of “t ...more
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Beauty by Roger Scruton
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More of Mark's books…
Myron Bradley Penner
“Christian thinkers, like everyone else, must accept their situatedness in language (i.e., history, culture, tradition). But they must also dispute the implication that such situatedness justifies either irresponsible play or joyless despair, for the story of language ends not with Babel but with Pentecost. Pentecost is especially important for understanding catholicity: the Spirit did not create church unity by creating a common tongue but ministered the Word of God to the assembled crowd in such a way that each person heard it in his or her own native language (Acts 2:8). Apparently there is not one language of heaven but many.”
Myron Bradley Penner, Christianity and the Postmodern Turn: Six Views

Myron Bradley Penner
“Mastery” is an inappropriate image for depicting epistemological success; knowledge is an exercise not of power but of virtue.”
Myron Bradley Penner, Christianity and the Postmodern Turn: Six Views

Ross Douthat
“Many of the overlapping crises in American life, from our foreign policy disasters to the housing bubble to the rate of out-of-wedlock births, can be traced to the impulse to emphasize one particular element of traditional Christianity—one insight, one doctrine, one teaching or tradition—at the expense of all the others. The goal is always progress: a belief system that’s simpler or more reasonable, more authentic or more up-to-date. Yet the results often vindicate the older Christian synthesis. Heresy sets out to be simpler and more appealing and more rational, but it often ends up being more extreme.”
Ross Douthat, Bad Religion: How We Became a Nation of Heretics

Myron Bradley Penner
“rationality has less to do with following scholarly procedures and more to do with becoming a saint.”
Myron Bradley Penner, Christianity and the Postmodern Turn: Six Views

“To sustain moral behavior, people need more than simply a list of rules. They need to be people who have a comprehensive view of the universe—a religion, or an ideology that functions like a religion—that stands behind those rules. Only such a comprehensive view can explain the rules (supplying answers to the crucial “ethical content questions” mentioned above), organize the rules (so we know how to handle difficult ethical judgments), justify the rules (making them seem plausible, and therefore worthy of obedience), and sacralize the rules (making them sacred and truly moral, rather than merely prudent advice). Without a comprehensive view of the universe, no body of ethical rules remains coherent for long.”
Greg Forster, Joy for the World: How Christianity Lost Its Cultural Influence and Can Begin Rebuilding It

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