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The Corrections
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Twilight: A Novel
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Matterhorn
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Just My Type by Simon Garfield
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The Reckoning by John McLain
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Review published on Curled Up With A Good Book at www.curledup.com
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The Reckoning is a coming-of-age story, a western, and a portrayal of human spirit fighting against loss, greed and cruelty. It is the story of two people and a story of many peo...more
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Do you work as a librarian for a living?

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The Secret Agent by Joseph Conrad
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Autobiography, Vol. 1 by Mark Twain
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Unbroken by Laura Hillenbrand
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Caleb's Crossing by Geraldine  Brooks
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In the Garden of Beasts by Erik Larson
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The Paris Wife by Paula McLain The Corrections by Jonathan Franzen The Reckoning by John McLain The Reckoning by John McLain Twilight by William Gay Vote on this list »
More of John's books…
John F. Kennedy
“If a free society cannot help the many who are poor, it cannot save the few who are rich.

[Inaugural Address, January 20 1961]
John F. Kennedy

Kurt Vonnegut
“Say what you will about the sweet miracle of unquestioning faith, I consider a capacity for it terrifying and absolutely vile.”
Kurt Vonnegut, Mother Night

Thomas Jefferson
“If the American people ever allow private banks to control the issue of their currency first by inflation then by deflation the banks and corporations that will grow up around them will deprive the people of all property until their children wake up homeless on the continent their Fathers conquered... I believe that banking institutions are more dangerous to our liberties than standing armies... The issuing power should be taken from the banks and restored to the people to whom it properly belongs.”
Thomas Jefferson

George Bernard Shaw
“The seriousness of throwing over hell whilst still clinging to the Atonement is obvious. If there is no punishment for sin there can be no self-forgiveness for it. If Christ paid our score, and if there is no hell and therefore no chance of our getting into trouble by forgetting the obligation, then we can be as wicked as we like with impunity inside the secular law, even from self-reproach, which becomes mere ingratitude to the Savior. On the other hand, if Christ did not pay our score, it still stands against us; and such debts make us extremely uncomfortable. The drive of evolution, which we call conscience and honor, seizes on such slips, and shames us to the dust for being so low in the scale as to be capable of them. The 'saved' thief experiences an ecstatic happiness which can never come to the honest atheist: he is tempted to steal again to repeat the glorious sensation. But if the atheist steals he has no such happiness. He is a thief and knows that he is a thief. Nothing can rub that off him. He may try to sooth his shame by some sort of restitution or equivalent act of benevolence; but that does not alter the fact that he did steal; and his conscience will not be easy until he has conquered his will to steal and changed himself into an honest man...

Now though the state of the believers in the atonement may thus be the happier, it is most certainly not more desirable from the point of view of the community. The fact that a believer is happier than a sceptic is no more to the point than the fact that a drunken man is happier than a sober one. The happiness of credulity is a cheap and dangerous quality of happiness, and by no means a necessity of life. Whether Socrates got as much happiness out of life as Wesley is an unanswerable question; but a nation of Socrateses would be much safer and happier than a nation of Wesleys; and its individuals would be higher in the evolutionary scale. At all events it is in the Socratic man and not in the Wesleyan that our hope lies now.

Consequently, even if it were mentally possible for all of us to believe in the Atonement, we should have to cry off it, as we evidently have a right to do. Every man to whom salvation is offered has an inalienable natural right to say 'No, thank you: I prefer to retain my full moral responsibility: it is not good for me to be able to load a scapegoat with my sins: I should be less careful how I committed them if I knew they would cost me nothing.'
George Bernard Shaw, Androcles and the Lion

“There are two things that are important in politics. The first is money and I can’t remember what the second one is.”
Mark Hanna

The Reckoning (Literature & Fiction)
1 chapters   —   updated Jul 07, 2011 09:13PM
Description: A coming-of-age Western adventure of greed, violence and retribution, THE RECKONING centers on the clash between a rugged old rancher and a dangerous, young Irish street thug. The novel ranges from the rough streets of early 20th-century Manhattan to the vast expanses and treacherous intrigues of life in Wyoming cattle country. Tom Callaghan, 19, agrees reluctantly to leave New York for Wyoming to avoid a stretch in Sing Sing prison — accompanied by Will Sherman, the same man he assaulted. At Sherman's Box T ranch in the Wind River basin, Tom immediately clashes with Will's headstrong daughter, Ellen, who views Tom as the usurper of her late brother's place. She is consumed with guilt over her role in her younger brother's death by the untamed black stallion, Caliban. And Tom quickly finds himself facing the enemies of his benefactor, Will Sherman, in a deadly reckoning. McLain’s screenplay, based on his novel, was a finalist in the international Writer’s Digest Screenwriting Competition.
Judymclain
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