Lucas Wiman

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The Great Debate:...
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No Place to Hide:...
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Consciousness Exp...
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See all 18 books that Lucas Wiman is reading…

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Lucas Wiman is now friends with Wilson Westbrook
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Homo Zapiens by Victor Pelevin
Homo Zapiens
by Victor Pelevin
read in July, 2016
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Seven Brief Lessons on Physics by Carlo Rovelli
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The Three-Body Problem by Liu Cixin
The Three-Body Problem (Remembrance of Earth’s Past, #1)
by Liu Cixin (Goodreads Author)
read in January, 2016
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The Dark Forest by Liu Cixin
The Dark Forest (Remembrance of Earth’s Past, #2)
by Liu Cixin (Goodreads Author)
read in January, 2016
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Scope and Closures by Kyle Simpson
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Scope and Closures by Kyle Simpson
"What a great little book. This might be the first Javascript book I've managed to finish without having my eyes glaze over from the tedium. Modern technical books tend to lean far too much on how-to examples and not enough time on deeper explanati..." Read more of this review »
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The Most Human Human by Brian Christian
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Information Wants to Be Shared by Joshua Gans
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The Black Banners by Ali H. Soufan
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More of Lucas Wiman's books…
Eric Schlosser
“Secrecy is essential to the command and control of nuclear weapons. Their technology is the opposite of open-source software. The latest warhead designs can’t be freely shared on the Internet, improved through anonymous collaboration, and productively used without legal constraints.”
Eric Schlosser, Command and Control: Nuclear Weapons, the Damascus Accident, and the Illusion of Safety

“The two national powers that dominated the colonies, France and Britain, represented two different models of corruption. Britain was seen as a failed ideal. It was corrupted republic, a place where the premise of government was basically sound but civic virtue—that of the public and public officials—was degenerating. On the other hand, France was seen as more essentially corrupt, a nation in which there was no true polity, but instead exchanges of luxury for power; a nation populated by weak subjects and flattering courtiers. Britain was the greater tragedy, because it held the promise of integrity, whereas France was simply something of a civic cesspool.”
Zephyr Teachout, Corruption in America: From Benjamin Franklin's Snuff Box to Citizens United

Eric Schlosser
“Perimeter greatly reduced the pressure to launch on warning at the first sign of an American attack. It gave Soviet leaders more time to investigate the possibility of a false alarm, confident that a real attack would trigger a computer-controlled, devastating response. But it rendered American plans for limited war meaningless; the Soviet computers weren’t programmed to allow pauses for negotiation. And the deterrent value of Perimeter was wasted. Like the doomsday machine in Dr. Strangelove, the system was kept secret from the United States.”
Eric Schlosser, Command and Control: Nuclear Weapons, the Damascus Accident, and the Illusion of Safety

Eric Schlosser
“one crucial fact must be kept in mind: none of the roughly seventy thousand nuclear weapons built by the United States since 1945 has ever detonated inadvertently or without proper authorization. The technological and administrative controls on those weapons have worked, however imperfectly at times—and countless people, military and civilian, deserve credit for that remarkable achievement. Had a single weapon been stolen or detonated, America’s command-and-control system would still have attained a success rate of 99.99857 percent. But nuclear weapons are the most dangerous technology ever invented. Anything less than 100 percent control of them, anything less than perfect safety and security, would be unacceptable. And if this book has any message to preach, it is that human beings are imperfect.”
Eric Schlosser, Command and Control: Nuclear Weapons, the Damascus Accident, and the Illusion of Safety

Eric Schlosser
“Nuclear weapons may well have made deliberate war less likely,” Sagan now thought, “but the complex and tightly coupled nuclear arsenal we have constructed has simultaneously made accidental war more likely.” Researching The Limits of Safety left him feeling pessimistic about our ability to control high-risk technologies. The fact that a catastrophic accident with a nuclear weapon has never occurred, Sagan wrote, can be explained less by “good design than good fortune.”
Eric Schlosser, Command and Control: Nuclear Weapons, the Damascus Accident, and the Illusion of Safety

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