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In the Unlikely E...
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by Judy Blume (Goodreads Author)
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V for Vendetta
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Alex is now following Robin Hobb's reviews
17730703
Alex rated a book 4 of 5 stars
Finders Keepers by Stephen King
Finders Keepers (Bill Hodges Trilogy, #2)
by Stephen King (Goodreads Author)
read in June, 2015
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The second Bill Hodges book has less to do with detective work than it does with literature, but that's not a bad thing. King has an unfortunate tendency to focus on prison rape in this one, but at least he has the plausible deniability of his charac ...more
Alex rated a book 2 of 5 stars
Role Models by John Waters
Role Models
by John Waters
read in August, 2015
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For super fans. This book is only intermittently interesting for more mainstream tastes; Waters writes about what interests him and goes off on tangents, but this only works when your tastes align with his.

He has a strong voice and some good chapter
...more
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In the Unlikely Event by Judy Blume
In the Unlikely Event
by Judy Blume (Goodreads Author)
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Alex is currently reading
Role Models by John Waters
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Alex rated a book 4 of 5 stars
Fool's Quest by Robin Hobb
Fool's Quest (The Fitz and The Fool, #2)
by Robin Hobb (Goodreads Author)
read in August, 2015
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Ends too abruptly - quite deliberately! - but is a great insight into the world of Fitz. The character is guilty of a lot of his normal foibles, and he spends entirely too much time unaware of something that the reader has known since the end of the ...more
Alex rated a book 4 of 5 stars
The Silence of the Lambs by Thomas Harris
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Now that's what I'm talking about! Lecter gets carte blanche to do what he wants because he's not the primary villain, so he and Clarice get to play a dangerous game together, and Harris is surprisingly sensitive towards the pseudo-trans issues it ta ...more
Alex rated a book 2 of 5 stars
I Don't Know What You Know Me From by Judy Greer
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Judy Greer is nice and cool, but she didn't need to write a book. This is a confessional of foibles, and has very little to do with the contents of her career.

I don't know what I expected of this. It's not bad, and it's short, but nobody really need
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Alex rated a book 3 of 5 stars
Ready Player One by Ernest Cline
Ready Player One
by Ernest Cline (Goodreads Author)
read in July, 2015
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A frequently annoying book set in a poorly explained future dystopia where nobody has money and yet a lot of people can afford the ruinously expensive items within the virtual world they escape to.

Cline is pretty bad at world building, but on this i
...more
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I Don't Know What You Know Me From by Judy Greer
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More of Alex's books…
David Foster Wallace
“If what's always distinguished bad writing--flat characters, a narrative world that's clichéd and not recognizably human, etc.--is also a description of today's world, then bad writing becomes an ingenious mimesis of a bad world. If readers simply believe the world is stupid and shallow and mean, then [Bret] Ellis can write a mean shallow stupid novel that becomes a mordant deadpan commentary on the badness of everything. Look man, we'd probably most of us agree that these are dark times, and stupid ones, but do we need fiction that does nothing but dramatize how dark and stupid everything is? In dark times, the definition of good art would seem to be art that locates and applies CPR to those elements of what's human and magical that still live and glow despite the times' darkness. Really good fiction could have as dark a worldview as it wished, but it'd find a way both to depict this world and to illuminate the possibilities for being alive and human in it.

Postmodern irony and cynicism's become an end in itself, a measure of hip sophistication and literary savvy. Few artists dare to try to talk about ways of working toward redeeming what's wrong, because they'll look sentimental and naive to all the weary ironists. Irony's gone from liberating to enslaving. There's some great essay somewhere that has a line about irony being the song of the prisoner who's come to love his cage… The postmodern founders' patricidal work was great, but patricide produces orphans, and no amount of revelry can make up for the fact that writers my age have been literary orphans throughout our formative years.

We enter a spiritual puberty where we snap to the fact that the great transcendent horror is loneliness, excluded encagement in the self. Once we’ve hit this age, we will now give or take anything, wear any mask, to fit, be part-of, not be Alone, we young. The U.S. arts are our guide to inclusion. A how-to. We are shown how to fashion masks of ennui and jaded irony at a young age where the face is fictile enough to assume the shape of whatever it wears. And then it’s stuck there, the weary cynicism that saves us from gooey sentiment and unsophisticated naïveté. Sentiment equals naïveté on this continent.

You burn with hunger for food that does not exist.

A U. S. of modern A. where the State is not a team or a code, but a sort of sloppy intersection of desires and fears, where the only public consensus a boy must surrender to is the acknowledged primacy of straight-line pursuing this flat and short-sighted idea of personal happiness.”
David Foster Wallace

André Aciman
“It would never have occurred to him that in placing the apricot in my palm he was giving me his ass to hold or that, in biting the fruit, I was also biting into that part of his body that must have been fairer than the rest because it never apricates - and near it, if I dared to bite that far, his apricock.”
André Aciman, Call Me by Your Name

George R.R. Martin
“Hodor!”
George R.R. Martin

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2013 Reading Challenge
Alex
Alex has completed his goal of reading 72 books for the 2013 Reading Challenge!
 
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2012 Reading Challenge
Alex
Alex has completed his goal of reading 82 books for the 2012 Reading Challenge!
 
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2011 Reading Challenge
Alex
Alex has completed his goal of reading 75 books for the 2011 Reading Challenge!
 
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correct:
6 (75.0%)

skipped:
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