Barb Edwards’s Profile

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Barb Edwards rated a book 4 of 5 stars
The Age of Miracles by Karen Thompson Walker
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Barb Edwards rated a book 4 of 5 stars
V is for Vengeance by Sue Grafton
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Notorious Nineteen by Janet Evanovich
" I don't understand why everyone is complaining about the formatting of the books. They are cupcakes for the brain; we know it, Janet knows it, so stop expecting a gourmet meal. Sometimes you just need a funny little fluffer-nutter of a book to rip... " Read more of this review »
Barb Edwards rated a book 4 of 5 stars
Notorious Nineteen by Janet Evanovich
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Barb Edwards rated a book 4 of 5 stars
Explosive Eighteen by Janet Evanovich
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Barb Edwards rated a book 4 of 5 stars
The Confidant by Hélène Grémillon
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Barb Edwards rated a book 2 of 5 stars
Down River by John Hart
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Barb Edwards rated a book 4 of 5 stars
Smokin' Seventeen by Janet Evanovich
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Barb Edwards rated a book 3 of 5 stars
The Writing Class by Jincy Willett
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Barb Edwards rated a book 4 of 5 stars
The Impossible Lives of Greta Wells by Andrew Sean Greer
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More of Barb's books…
Pearl S. Buck
“None of us is so much better or wiser than any other than he can destroy a single creature without destroying something of himself." page 270 Pavilion of Women”
Pearl S. Buck

John Steinbeck
“The redwoods, once seen, leave a mark or create a vision that stays with you always. No one has ever successfully painted or photographed a redwood tree. The feeling they produce is not transferable. From them comes silence and awe. It's not only their unbelievable stature, nor the color which seems to shift and vary under your eyes, no, they are not like any trees we know, they are ambassadors from another time. They have the mystery of ferns that disappeared a million years ago into the coal of the carboniferous era. They carry their own light and shade. The vainest, most slap-happy and irreverent of men, in the presence of redwoods, goes under a spell of wonder and respect. Respect--that's the word. One feels the need to bow to unquestioned sovereigns. I have known these great ones since my earliest childhood, have lived among them, camped and slept against their warm monster bodies, and no amount of association has bred contempt in me. p. 168”
John Steinbeck

John Steinbeck
“I have had a lifelong association with these things. (Odd that the word 'trees' does not apply.) I can accept them and their power and their age because I was early exposed to them. ON the other hand, people lacking such experience begin to have a feeling of uneasiness here, of danger, of being shut in, enclosed and overwhelmed. It is not only the size of these redwoods but their strangeness that frightens them. And why not? For these are the last remaining members of a race that flourished over four continents as far back in geologic time as the upper Jurassic period. Fossils of these ancients have been found dating from the Cretaceous era while in the Eocene and Miocene they were spread over England and Europe and America. And then the glaciers moved down and wiped the Titans out beyond recovery. And only these few are left--a stunning memory of what the world was like once long ago. Can it be that we do not love to be reminded that we are very young and callow in a world that was old when we came into it? And could there be a strong resistance to the certainty that a living world will continue its stately way when we no longer inhabit it? p. 172 Travels with Charley”
John Steinbeck

John Steinbeck
“For how can one know color in perpetual green, and what good is warmth without cold to give it sweetness?”
John Steinbeck, Travels with Charley: In Search of America

Pearl S. Buck
“Is our Heaven your God, and is your God our Heaven?' she inquired.
'They are one and the same,' he replied...
'There is only one true God. He has many names.'
'Then anywhere upon the round earth, by whatever seas, those who believe in any God believe in the One?' she asked.
'And so are brothers,' he said, agreeing.
'And if I do not believe in any?' she inquired willfully.
'God is patient,' he said. 'God waits. Is there not eternity?'"
page 206 Pavilion of Women”
Pearl S. Buck

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