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Smart Baseball by Keith Law
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American Heiress by Jeffrey Toobin
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3.5 Stars

The story of Patricia Hearst's kidnapping is fascinating, as is the story of the radical and dangerous place America was in the late 1960s and early 1970s (For all of the talk and all the fear about our dangerous world, it's hard to imagine
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Doomsday Book by Connie Willis
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Doomsday Book by Connie Willis
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Ink and Bone by Rachel Caine
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A Darker Shade of Magic by V.E. Schwab
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A Gathering of Shadows by V.E. Schwab
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Doomsday Book by Connie Willis
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A Darker Shade of Magic by V.E. Schwab
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More of Darren's books…
Rinker Buck
“spring. The enormous economic impact of the mule trade and how Oregon Trail traffic stimulated the American economy have been frequently ignored by historians, mostly because it is a lot more prestigious for professional academics to sound learned about Senator Thomas Hart Benton or the Missouri Compromise than to actually know something about America’s basic means of transportation for a century—wagons and mules. Yes,”
Rinker Buck, The Oregon Trail: A New American Journey

John Scalzi
“Here's a quick rule of thumb: Don't annoy science fiction writers. These are people who destroy entire planets before lunch. Think of what they'll do to you.”
John Scalzi

Joe Abercrombie
“If you have a plan," hissed Sumael from the corner of her mouth, "now would be the time."

"I have a plan," said Nothing.

"Does it involve swords?"

A pause. "All my plans do."

"Do you have a sword?"

Another. "No."

"How will you succeed without one?" Muttered Sumael.

A third. "Death waits for us all.”
Joe Abercrombie, Half a King
tags: humor

Rinker Buck
“The pioneers and their new Indian partners amply displayed the American penchant for technological prowess, developing shore-to-shore windlasses and flatboat ferries to cross the rivers, innovations as vital to the country’s progress as the steam engine and the telegraph. America’s default toward massive waste and environmental havoc was also, and hilariously, perfected along the trail. Scammed by the merchants of Independence and St. Joe into overloading their wagons, the pioneers jettisoned thousands of tons of excess gear, food, and even pianos along the ruts, turning vast riverfront regions of the West into America’s first and largest Superfund sites. On issue after issue—disease, religious strife, the fierce competition for water—the trail served as an incubator for conflicts that would continue to reverberate through American culture until our own day.”
Rinker Buck, The Oregon Trail: A New American Journey

Terry Pratchett
“The reason that the rich were so rich, Vimes reasoned, was because they managed to spend less money.

Take boots, for example. He earned thirty-eight dollars a month plus allowances. A really good pair of leather boots cost fifty dollars. But an affordable pair of boots, which were sort of OK for a season or two and then leaked like hell when the cardboard gave out, cost about ten dollars. Those were the kind of boots Vimes always bought, and wore until the soles were so thin that he could tell where he was in Ankh-Morpork on a foggy night by the feel of the cobbles.

But the thing was that good boots lasted for years and years. A man who could afford fifty dollars had a pair of boots that'd still be keeping his feet dry in ten years' time, while the poor man who could only afford cheap boots would have spent a hundred dollars on boots in the same time and would still have wet feet.

This was the Captain Samuel Vimes 'Boots' theory of socioeconomic unfairness.”
Terry Pratchett, Men at Arms: The Play

25x33 Muskogee Public Library's Once Upon A Book Club — 8 members — last activity Aug 26, 2014 02:27PM
MPL's fantasy/sci-fi book club! The group meets the second Thursday of every month from August to May and discusses a wide variety of fantasy/sci-fi l ...more
37510 Muskogee Public Library's Third Thursday Book Club — 24 members — last activity Aug 26, 2014 02:02PM
Welcome to the Third Thursday Book Club! The Book Club Runs from August through May and meets the third Thursday of every month. The books vary from g ...more
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