Scribble Orca
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Scribble Orca

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The Wealth of Net...
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Scribble Orca Scribble Orca said: " Fortuitous circumstance, such as a relatively complete (since to what extent are friends not also?) stranger commenting on the thread of the review of The Avignon Quintet, encouraged an initially cursory but developing to in-depth perusal of establis ...more "

 
Experimental Fict...
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recommended to Scribble Orca by: Nathan "N.R." Gaddis
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  (page 17 of 58)
"“That the purport of [Lethem’s] themes don’t go much beyond surface satire is in its favour, as we aren’t subjected to...the tedium the exploration of “ideas” in fiction usually entails.” A limiting view of innovation/exploration/new ways of seeing the old. The ‘novel of ideas’ de-emphasises character (let alone plot), which Green acknowledges as motive for writers attempting to push the envelope." May 16, 2015 08:26PM

 
See all 29 books that Scribble is reading…

Scribble's Recent Updates

Brightfellow by Rikki Ducornet
" Brightfellow is a pale sod to the other novels MJ mentions....sorry (or perhaps not) to poop the party. A "marvellous addition" it ain't. "
Scribble Orca marked as to-be-consideread
The Eagle's Throne by Carlos Fuentes
The Eagle's Throne
by Carlos Fuentes
recommended to Scribble Orca by: MJ Nicholls
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Good Old Neon by David Foster Wallace
" Hady wrote: "Brilliant! just Brilliant!"

Thanks for reading, Hady. Appreciated.
"
Scribble Orca and 16 other people liked Seemita's status update
Seemita
Seemita is on page 660 of 736 of Ulysses: 'The twilight hours advance from long landshadows, dispersed, lagging, languideyed, their cheeks delicate with cipria and false faint bloom. They are in grey gauze with dark bat sleeves that flutter in the land breeze.'
Scribble Orca made a comment on their review of Soumission
Soumission by Michel Houellebecq
" Jan wrote: "If I read the Huffpost article maybe I won't have to reread the Gopnik!"

Jan, the HP article fingers quite a few myths currently making the
...more "
Scribble Orca and 5 other people liked Kalliope's status update
Kalliope
Kalliope is on page 153 of 253 of Los amores difíciles
Scribble Orca marked as dream-on-ditz
Soumission by Michel Houellebecq
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Every era delights in the literature it deserves

Hell hath no self-loathing as a misanthrope mirrored.
Scribble Orca marked as to-be-consideread
Postmodern plagiarisms  by Mirjam Horn
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Return of the prodigal offspring? Legitimising in literature what is elsewhere acceptable...(now if we could only have someone do this for non-US lit...)
The Exagggerations of Peter Prince by Steve Katz
" Nathan "N.R." wrote: "Blurp? Blurb? Blob? Maybe 'blub'?"

The postlewd to ingestion and the prelewd to (in)digestion ausser leavened with spice to entic
...more "
More of Scribble's books…
Aldous Huxley
“With me, travelling is frankly a vice. The temptation to indulge in it is one which I find almost as hard to resist as the temptation to read promiscuously, omnivorously and without purpose. From time to time, it is true, I make a desperate resolution to mend my ways. I sketch out programmes of useful, serious reading; I try to turn my rambling voyages into systematic tours through the history of art and civilization. But without much success. After a little I relapse into my old bad ways. Deplorable weakness! I try to comfort myself with the hope that even my vices may be of some profit to me.”
Aldous Huxley

William H. Gass
“In general, I would think that at present prose writers are much in advance of the poets. In the old days, I read more poetry than prose, but now it is in prose where you find things being put together well, where there is great ambition, and equal talent. Poets have gotten so careless, it is a disgrace. You can’t pick up a page. All the words slide off.”
William H. Gass

Susanna Clarke
“Besides,” said Mr Norrell, “I really have no desire to write reviews of other people's books. Modern publications upon magic are the most pernicious things in the world, full of misinformation and wrong opinions.”

“Then sir, you may say so. The ruder you are, the more the editors will be delighted.”

“But it is my own opinions which I wish to make better known, not other people's.”

“Ah, but, sir,” said Lascelles, “it is precisely by passing judgements upon other people's work and pointing out their errors that readers can be made to understand your own opinions better. It is the easiest thing in the world to turn a review to one's own ends. One only need mention the book once or twice and for the rest of the article one may develop one's theme just as one chuses. It is, I assure you, what every body else does.”

“Hmm,” said Mr Norrell thoughtfully, “you may be right. But, no. It would seem as if I were lending support to what ought never to have been published in the first place.”
Susanna Clarke, Jonathan Strange & Mr Norrell

Gilbert Sorrentino
“Outside of the dreary rubbish that is churned out by god knows how many hacks of varying degrees of talent, the novel is, it seems to me, a very special and rarefied kind of literary form, and was, for a brief moment only, wide-ranging in its sociocultural influence. For the most part, it has always been an acquired taste and it asks a good deal from its audience. Our great contemporary problem is in separating that which is really serious from that which is either frivolously and fashionably "radical" and that which is a kind of literary analogy to the Letterman show. It's not that there is pop culture around, it's that so few people can see the difference between it and high culture, if you will. Morton Feldman is not Stephen Sondheim. The latter is a wonderful what-he-is, but he is not what-he-is-not. To pretend that he is is to insult Feldman and embarrass Sondheim, to enact a process of homogenization that is something like pretending that David Mamet, say, breathes the same air as Samuel Beckett. People used to understand that there is, at any given time, a handful of superb writers or painters or whatever--and then there are all the rest. Nothing wrong with that. But it now makes people very uncomfortable, very edgy, as if the very idea of a Matisse or a Charles Ives or a Thelonious Monk is an affront to the notion of "ain't everything just great!" We have the spectacle of perfectly nice, respectable, harmless writers, etc., being accorded the status of important artists...Essentially the serious novelist should do what s/he can do and simply forgo the idea of a substantial audience.”
Gilbert Sorrentino

Arshia Sattar
“I’m really tired of people saying what is lost in translation. Look at what you gain. You gain three universes worth of books. It’s worth it to lose something in translation, if you can get a hundred more texts that are going to change your life.”
Arshia Sattar

Flimsy attempts at satire (Humor)
1 chapters   —   updated May 13, 2015 06:30PM
Description: The title says it all, really.
Film Hall of Fame (Entertainment)
1 chapters   —   updated May 13, 2015 06:30PM
Description: The idea for this is owed to Brian's Review Hall of Fame.
Short Stories (Literature & Fiction)
2 chapters   —   updated Oct 21, 2012 09:33PM
Description: Currently two short stories submitted for the 2012 The Age (Melbourne newspaper) Short Story Competition.
On The Issue of Identity (Select)
2 chapters   —   updated Nov 15, 2010 12:52PM
Description: Just my own personal take...
Fililee and the Elf-Prince (Science Fiction & Fantasy)
1 chapters   —   updated Nov 10, 2010 12:57AM
Description: Princess Fililee has been forbidden to accompany her father to the Elves. She disobeys, and seals her fate.
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40475 The Extra Cool Group! (of people Michael is experimenting on) — 160 members — last activity Aug 27, 2013 12:21PM
*Note: This group, although it lives on in a sense, like a photograph, capturing a moment so people can look back later and go, "Oh, wow, you looked s ...more
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This is a place to give feedback about Goodreads. Feature ideas, bugs, or any other suggestion for improvement. The Goodreads staff monitors this grou ...more
75460 The Year of Reading Proust — 1552 members — last activity Jan 10, 2016 06:53AM
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