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Tim rated a book 4 of 5 stars
Montano's Malady by Enrique Vila-Matas
Montano's Malady
by Enrique Vila-Matas
read in March, 2013
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Essays and Lectures by Ralph Waldo Emerson
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Selected Poetry and Prose by Stéphane Mallarmé
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Oeuvres complètes by Stéphane Mallarmé
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Tim is now a fan of Stéphane Mallarmé
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Tim rated a book 4 of 5 stars
Los sinsabores del verdadero policía by Roberto Bolaño
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The Literary Absolute by Philippe Lacoue-Labarthe
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A Short History of Decay by Emil Cioran
A Short History of Decay
by Emil Cioran
read in January, 2013
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Your Face Tomorrow, Vol. 1 by Javier Marías
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“The poets made all the words and therefore language is the archives of history, and, if we must say it, a sort of tomb of the muses. For though the origin of most of our words is forgotten, each word was at first a stroke of genius, and obtained currency because for the moment it symbolized the world to the first speaker and to the hearer. The etymologist finds the deadest word to have been once a brilliant picture. Language is fossil poetry.”
Ralph Waldo Emerson
More of Tim's books…
Theodor W. Adorno
“The darkening of the world makes the irrationality of art rational: radically darkened art.”
Theodor W. Adorno, Aesthetic Theory

Friedrich Nietzsche
“In this sense the Dionysian man resembles Hamlet: both have once looked truly into the essence of things, they have gained knowledge, and nausea inhibits action; for their action could not change anything in the eternal nature of things; they feel it to be ridiculous or humiliating that they should be asked to set right a world that is out of joint. Knowledge kills action; action requires the veils of illusion: that is the doctrine of Hamlet, not that cheap wisdom of Jack the Dreamer who reflects too much and, as it were, from an excess of possibilities does not get around to action. Not reflection, no--true knowledge, an insight into the horrible truth, outweighs any motive for action, both in Hamlet and in the Dionysian man.

Now no comfort avails any more; longing transcends a world after death, even the gods; existence is negated along with its glittering reflection in the gods or in an immortal beyond. Conscious of the truth he has once seen, man now sees everywhere only the horror or absurdity of existence; now he understands what is symbolic in Ophelia's fate; now he understands the wisdom of the sylvan god, Silenus: he is nauseated.

Here, when the danger to his will is greatest, art approaches as a saving sorceress, expert at healing. She alone knows how to turn these nauseous thoughts about the horror or absurdity of existence into notions with which one can live: these are the sublime as the artistic taming of the horrible, and the comic as the artistic discharge of the nausea of absurdity. The satyr chorus of the dithyramb is the saving deed of Greek art; faced with the intermediary world of these Dionysian companions, the feelings described here exhausted themselves.”
Friedrich Nietzsche, The Birth of Tragedy/The Case of Wagner

Theodor W. Adorno
“Art is the social antithesis of society, not directly deducible from it.”
Theodor W. Adorno, Aesthetic Theory

Emil Cioran
“The initial revelation of any monastery: everything is nothing. Thus begin all mysticisms. It is less than one step from nothing to God, for God is the positive expression of nothingness.”
Emil Cioran, Tears and Saints

Emil Cioran
“Naive enough to set off in pursuit of Truth, I had explored - to no avail - any number of disciplines. I was beginning to be confirmed in my skepticism when the notion occurred to me of consulting, as a last result, Poetry: who knows? perhaps it would be profitable, perhaps it conceals beneath its arbitrary appearances some definitive revelation ... Illusory recourse! Poetry had outstripped be in negation and cost me even my uncertainties ...”
Emil Cioran, All Gall Is Divided: Aphorisms

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