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The Foundling
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Invisible Cities
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The Amazing Adven...
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  (page 209 of 636)
May 26, 2011 09:27AM

 

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Paolo is now friends with Soleil
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Blankets by Craig Thompson
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Journey into Mystery by Kieron Gillen
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Journey into Mystery by Kieron Gillen
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Journey into Mystery by Kieron Gillen
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“I love her, and that's the beginning and end of everything.”
F. Scott Fitzgerald
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Dash & Lily's Book of Dares by Rachel Cohn
Dash & Lily's Book of Dares
by Rachel Cohn
read in April, 2012
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Paolo made a comment on his review of The Lover's Dictionary
The Lover's Dictionary by David Levithan
" Kristel wrote: "Oh hey, did you manage to get a trade paperback?"

Yep! The one Yukeh ordered from Bookdep a few months ago. But local bookstores alread
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Paolo rated a book 4 of 5 stars
The Lover's Dictionary by David Levithan
The Lover's Dictionary
by David Levithan (Goodreads Author)
read in March, 2012
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The Foundling by Georgette Heyer
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More of Paolo's books…
Roland Barthes
“Besides intercourse (when the Image-repertoire goes to the devil), there is that other embrace, which is a motionless cradling: we are enchanted, bewitched: we are in the realm of sleep, without sleeping; we are within the voluptous infantilism of sleepiness: this is the moment for telling stories, the moment of the voice which takes me, siderates me, this is the return to the mother ("in the loving calm of your arms," says a poem set to music by Duparc). In this companionable incest, everything is suspended: time, law, prohibition: nothing is exhausted, nothing is wanted: all desires are abolished, for they seem definitively fulfilled.
Yet, within this infantile embrace, the genital unfailingly appears; it cuts off the diffuse sensuality of the incestuous embrace; the logic of desire begins to function, the will-to-possess returns, the adult is superimposed upon the child. I am then two subjects at once: I want maternity and genitality. (The lover might be defined as a child getting an erection: such was the young Eros.)”
Roland Barthes, A Lover's Discourse: Fragments

Roland Barthes
“Am I in love? --yes, since I am waiting. The other one never waits. Sometimes I want to play the part of the one who doesn't wait; I try to busy myself elsewhere, to arrive late; but I always lose at this game. Whatever I do, I find myself there, with nothing to do, punctual, even ahead of time. The lover's fatal identity is precisely this: I am the one who waits.”
Roland Barthes, A Lover's Discourse: Fragments

Haruki Murakami
“So what’s wrong if there happens to be one guy in the world who enjoys trying to understand you?”
Haruki Murakami, Norwegian Wood

Haruki Murakami
“I guess I've been waiting so long I'm looking for perfection. That makes it tough."

"Waiting for perfect love?"

"No, even I know better than that. I'm looking for selfishness. Like, say I tell you I want to eat strawberry shortcake. And you stop everything you're doing and run out and buy it for me. And you come back out of breath and get down on your knees and hold this strawberry shortcake out to me. And I say I don't want it anymore and throw it out the window. That's what I'm looking for.”
Haruki Murakami, Norwegian Wood

Roland Barthes
“Werther identifies himself with the madman, with the footman. As a reader, I can identify myself with Werther. Historically, thousands of subjects have done so, suffering, killing themselves, dressing, perfuming themselves, writing as if they were Werther (songs, poems, candy boxes, belt buckles, fans, colognes a' la Werther). A long chain of equivalences links all the lovers in the world. In the theory of literature, "projection" (of the reader into the character) no longer has any currency: yet it is the appropriate tonality of imaginative readings: reading a love story, it is scarcely adequate to say I project myself; I cling to the image of the lover, shut up with his image in the very enclosure of the book (everyone knows that such stories are read in a state of secession, of retirement, of voluptuous absence: in the toilet).”
Roland Barthes, A Lover's Discourse: Fragments

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