Lesley

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Eat That Frog! by Brian Tracy
"A self-development book that seems like a long PowerPoint presentation, with tons of quotes from people I never heard of. So I'm supposed to be inspired and motivated by a certain Jonathan Smerkfeese who says "Procrastination. Such a bad, bad thin..." Read more of this review »
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Year in Books
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The Naturals by Jennifer Lynn Barnes
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Is the premise of The Naturals completely unbelievable? Yes. Does it feature a cliche teen love triangle? Yes. Does it read like Criminal Minds fanfic? Yes. Did I like it? Hell yes! Much to my surprise, this fast-paced thriller kept me on the edge of ...more
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Shades of Honor by Sandy Williams
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3.5 Stars

If you enjoyed Shades of Treason, then Shades of Honor will not disappoint. This story picks up where the first book left off, following Ash and Rykus as they navigate political intrigue and family drama, shoot their way out of deadly situat
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Shades of Treason by Sandy Williams
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3.5 Stars

While I wasn’t particularly impressed with The Shadow Reader, I was intrigued enough with the premise of Shades of Treason, the first in Williams’ new sci-fi romance series, that I decided to give this author another try. And I am very glad
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Cracked by Eliza Crewe
Cracked (Soul Eaters, #1)
by Eliza Crewe (Goodreads Author)
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3.5 Stars

Cracked is a quick, fun read. The plot is predictable (none of the twists are all that twisty), and it’s difficult to decide which is more painfully cheesy - the Agent Smith-esque demons or the petty high school drama. But, despite these com
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Second Son by Lee Child
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3.5 Stars

This Jack Reacher short story is just a teensy bit cheesy. Watching Reacher boss around adult military dudes at age 13 just feels incredibly silly. (Presumably, the adults go along with it because they recognize Reacher’s badassness, even as
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A Perilous Undertaking by Deanna Raybourn
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A Perilous Undertaking contains everything I loved about A Curious Beginning and more. Veronica and Stoker again find themselves on the trail of a murderer, and as they try to untangle the mystery, they stumble into some dangerous - and hilarious - s ...more
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Dad Is Fat by Jim Gaffigan
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Sometimes witty, sometimes touching, and sometimes outright hilarious, Dad is Fat delivers a series of amusing observations about the joys and challenges of being a father. Relatable even for those of us who aren’t parents, this book is sure to give ...more
More of Lesley's books…
John Green
“You are helpful, and you are loved, and you are forgiven, and you are not alone.”
John Green

Philip Pullman
“There are some themes, some subjects, too large for adult fiction; they can only be dealt with adequately in a children's book.

The reason for that is that in adult literary fiction, stories are there on sufferance. Other things are felt to be more important: technique, style, literary knowingness. Adult writers who deal in straightforward stories find themselves sidelined into a genre such as crime or science fiction, where no one expects literary craftsmanship.

But stories are vital. Stories never fail us because, as Isaac Bashevis Singer says, "events never grow stale." There's more wisdom in a story than in volumes of philosophy. And by a story I mean not only Little Red Riding Hood and Cinderella and Jack and the Beanstalk but also the great novels of the nineteenth century, Jane Eyre, Middlemarch, Bleak House and many others: novels where the story is at the center of the writer's attention, where the plot actually matters. The present-day would-be George Eliots take up their stories as if with a pair of tongs. They're embarrassed by them. If they could write novels without stories in them, they would. Sometimes they do.

But what characterizes the best of children's authors is that they're not embarrassed to tell stories. They know how important stories are, and they know, too, that if you start telling a story you've got to carry on till you get to the end. And you can't provide two ends, either, and invite the reader to choose between them. Or as in a highly praised recent adult novel I'm about to stop reading, three different beginnings. In a book for children you can't put the plot on hold while you cut artistic capers for the amusement of your sophisticated readers, because, thank God, your readers are not sophisticated. They've got more important things in mind than your dazzling skill with wordplay. They want to know what happens next.”
Philip Pullman

Cory Doctorow
“For me the major turning point in my working life was when I figured out that the work I produced when I felt inspired wasn't any different from the work I produced when I felt uninspired -- at least a few months later. I think that "inspiration" has to do with your own confidence in your ideas, your blood sugar, the external pressures in your life, and a million other factors only tangentially related to the actual quality of the work. If creative work makes you sane and happy (and if it supports you financially), it's terrible to harness it to something you can't control, like "inspiration" -- it sucks to only be happy when something you can't control occurs.”
Cory Doctorow

J.K. Rowling
“I have a real issue with anyone trying to protect children from their own imaginations. If we cannot acknowledge that a lot of us have a bit of darkness within ourselves, some more than others perhaps, and bring it into the light and examine it and talk about this part of the human condition, then I think we will be living in quite a dangerous climate. I think that’s much more damaging for children.”
J.K. Rowling

Alfred Hitchcock
“There is a distinct difference between "suspense" and "surprise," and yet many pictures continually confuse the two. I'll explain what I mean.

We are now having a very innocent little chat. Let's suppose that there is a bomb underneath this table between us. Nothing happens, and then all of a sudden, "Boom!" There is an explosion. The public is surprised, but prior to this surprise, it has seen an absolutely ordinary scene, of no special consequence. Now, let us take a suspense situation. The bomb is underneath the table and the public knows it, probably because they have seen the anarchist place it there. The public is aware the bomb is going to explode at one o'clock and there is a clock in the decor. The public can see that it is a quarter to one. In these conditions, the same innocuous conversation becomes fascinating because the public is participating in the scene. The audience is longing to warn the characters on the screen: "You shouldn't be talking about such trivial matters. There is a bomb beneath you and it is about to explode!"

In the first case we have given the public fifteen seconds of surprise at the moment of the explosion. In the second we have provided them with fifteen minutes of suspense. The conclusion is that whenever possible the public must be informed. Except when the surprise is a twist, that is, when the unexpected ending is, in itself, the highlight of the story.”
Alfred Hitchcock

220 Goodreads Librarians Group — 73819 members — last activity 4 minutes ago
A place where all Goodreads members can work together to improve the Goodreads book catalog. Non-librarians are welcome to join the group as well, to ...more
23388 Literary Escapism — 236 members — last activity Apr 04, 2014 03:30PM
Welcome to my alternate reality. Escaping into new worlds, meeting new characters and exploring different societies is the only way we have of leaving ...more
66450 Book Guys & Book Girls — 260 members — last activity Jul 17, 2016 10:37PM
A Group for listeners of The Book Guys Show & The Book Girls Show.
60101 Book Boyfriends — 1598 members — last activity Jul 09, 2017 12:50PM
We now have a group to have our discussions or fights over our book boyfriends. Loving fictional boys since December 19, 2011.
93446 The DeFranco Book Club — 4629 members — last activity Jul 02, 2017 03:59AM
Lets read lots of books together before our brains turn to mush. Delicious delicious mush. #1) Outliers by Malcolm Gladwell #2) The Art of Racing in t ...more
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