Quentin Norman

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The Five Love Lan...
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Communicating in ...
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A Storm of Swords
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Quentin Norman wants to read
Expendable by James Alan Gardner
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Girl, Interrupted by Susanna Kaysen
“Once you start parsing a face, it's a peculiar item: squishy, pointy, with lots of air vents and wet spots.”
Susanna Kaysen
Girl, Interrupted by Susanna Kaysen
“When digital watches were invented years later they reminded me of five-minute checks. They murdered time in the same way -slowly- chopping off pieces of it and lobbing them into the dustbin with a little click to let you know time was gone. Click, swish, "Checks," swish, click: another five minutes of life down the drain. And spent in this place.”
Susanna Kaysen
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Petals on the Wind by V.C. Andrews
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Just finished reading Petals on the Wind. Just as deliciously trashy as the first, written (naturally) in the same way that is so technically awful as to be relatively readable. I enjoyed it immensely, feeling with every word that these books are my ...more
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Flowers in the Attic by V.C. Andrews
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Quentin Norman is now following Meg and Claudia
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The Five Love Languages of Children by Gary Chapman
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The Five Love Languages by Gary Chapman
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English by Sarah North
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More of Quentin's books…
Susanna Kaysen
“People ask, How did you get in there? What they really want to know is if they are likely to end up in there as well. I can't answer the real question. All I can tell them is, It's easy.”
Susanna Kaysen, Girl, Interrupted

Susanna Kaysen
“Some people say that having any conscious opinion on the matter is a mark of sanity, but I'm not sure that's true. I still think about it. I'll always have to think about it.
I often ask myself if I'm crazy. I ask other people too. 'Is this a crazy thing to say?' I'll ask before saying something that probably isn't crazy.
I start a lot of sentences with 'Maybe I'm totally nuts,' or 'Maybe I've gone 'round the bend.'
If I do something out of the ordinary, like take two baths in a day for example- I say to myself: Are you crazy"
It's a common phrase, I know. But it means something particular to me: the tunnels, the security screens, the plastic forks, the shimmering, ever-shifting borderline that like all boundaries beckons and asks to be crossed. I do not want to cross it again”
Susanna Kaysen, Girl, Interrupted

Susanna Kaysen
“When digital watches were invented years later they reminded me of five-minute checks. They murdered time in the same way -slowly- chopping off pieces of it and lobbing them into the dustbin with a little click to let you know time was gone. Click, swish, "Checks," swish, click: another five minutes of life down the drain. And spent in this place.”
Susanna Kaysen, Girl, Interrupted

Sylvia Plath
“God, but life is loneliness, despite all the opiates, despite the shrill tinsel gaiety of "parties" with no purpose, despite the false grinning faces we all wear. And when at last you find someone to whom you feel you can pour out your soul, you stop in shock at the words you utter - they are so rusty, so ugly, so meaningless and feeble from being kept in the small cramped dark inside you so long. Yes, there is joy, fulfillment and companionship - but the loneliness of the soul in its appalling self-consciousness is horrible and overpowering.”
Sylvia Plath, The Unabridged Journals of Sylvia Plath

Susanna Kaysen
“The disorder is more common in women."
Note the construction of that sentence. They did not write, "The disorder is more common in women." It would still be suspect, but they didn't bother trying to cover their tracks.
Many disorders, judging by the hospital population, were more commonly diagnosed in women. Take, for example, "compulsive promiscuity."
How many girls do you think a seventeen-year-old boy would have to screw to earn the label "compulsively promiscuous"? Three? No, not enough. Six? Doubtful. Ten? That seems more likely. Probably in the fifteen-to-twenty range, would be my guess - if they ever put that label on boys, which I don't recall their doing....
In the list of six "potentially self-damaging" activities favored by the borderline personality, three are commonly associated with women (shopping sprees, shoplifting, and eating binges) and one with men (reckless driving). One is not "gender specific," as they say these days (psychoactive substance abuse). And the definition of the other (casual sex) is in the eye of the beholder.”
Susanna Kaysen, Girl, Interrupted

29193 Feminist Mysteries — 25 members — last activity Aug 03, 2012 09:24AM
For those who read mysteries with strong female characters and feminist story lines!
13167 Feminist Reader — 87 members — last activity Aug 14, 2012 11:44AM
A group where people can talk about feminist non-fiction books and feminist issues that effect them. Hopefully fellow feminist can connect and talk ab ...more
25x33 Feminist Science Fiction & Fantasy — 212 members — last activity Jul 26, 2016 07:27AM
What are some of your favorite feminist science fiction and fantasy books? Who are some of your favorite feminist science fiction and fantasy authors? ...more
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