Larry Bassett

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Beautiful Souls: ...
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"It is never easy to say no, particularly in extreme situations, but it is always possible, and so it is necessary to try to understand how and why ordinary women and men sometimes make what is difficult but possible real." 8 hours, 50 min ago

 
A People's Histor...
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Larry Bassett Larry Bassett said: " An essential book for your home library for mind expansion and reference. "

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"Chapter 4 is by far the most amazing chapter so far for me. It tells a lot about the efforts of The upper-class to stay in charge even as they foment a revolution By The People. It has some startling information about popular uprisings in the decade before 1776." Mar 25, 2017 09:06PM

 
Small Is Beautifu...
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"Take the question of size of a city. While one cannot judge these things with precision, I think it is fairly safe to say that the upper limit of what is desirable for the size of a city is probably some thing of the order of half a million inhabitants. It is quite clear that above such a size nothing is added to the virtue of the city." Mar 20, 2017 09:28AM

 

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Larry Bassett is 3% done with Beautiful Souls: It is never easy to say no, particularly in extreme situations, but it is always possible, and so it is necessary to try to understand how and why ordinary women and men sometimes make what is difficult but possible real.
Beautiful Souls by Eyal Press
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Larry Bassett is starting Beautiful Souls: We’ve all arrived at junctures where our deepest principles collide with the loyalties we harbor and the duties we are expected to fulfill, and wrestled with how far to go to keep our consciences clean. As far as necessary to be true to ourselves, a voice inside our heads tells us.
Beautiful Souls by Eyal Press
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Beautiful Souls by Eyal Press
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The Blank Slate by Steven Pinker
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I found that a good deal of this book was like reading a textbook. For me that meant it was a somewhat arduous read and filled with so much information that I could not even begin to absorb it all. It was not enjoyable for casual reading especially t ...more
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A People's History of the United States by Howard Zinn
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The Manchurian Candidate by Richard Condon
The Manchurian Candidate
by Richard Condon
read in March, 2017
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OK I haven't seen either of the movies made from this book. But you have heard over and over but the movies although they may have been good didn't really capture the book. I thought the book was stunningly satiric and I think it fits so well with th ...more
Larry Bassett and 53 other people liked Lyn's review of The Manchurian Candidate:
The Manchurian Candidate by Richard Condon
"A deliciously cynical and satirical pseudo thriller black comedy about McCarthyism and 50s Americana.

But wait! – you say – black comedy?? is this not a psychological thriller about an American soldier who is brainwashed and hypnotized to be a slee..." Read more of this review »
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The Manchurian Candidate by Richard Condon
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The Manchurian Candidate by Richard Condon
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Small Is Beautiful by Ernst F. Schumacher
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More of Larry's books…
Isabel Wilkerson
“The presence of the migrants “in such large numbers crushed and stagnated the progress of Negro life,” the economist Sadie Mossell wrote early in the migration to Philadelphia. Newly available census records suggest the opposite to be true. According to a growing body of research, the migrants were, it turns out, better educated than those they left behind in the South and, on the whole, had nearly as many years of schooling as those they encountered in the North. Compared to the northern blacks already there, the migrants were more likely to be married and remain married, more likely to raise their children in two-parent households, and more likely to be employed. The migrants, as a group, managed to earn higher incomes than northern-born blacks even though they were relegated to the lowest-paying positions. They were less likely to be on welfare than the blacks they encountered in the North, partly because they had come so far, had experienced such hard times, and were willing to work longer hours or second jobs in positions that few northern blacks, or hardly anyone else for that matter, wanted, as was the case with Ida Mae Gladney, George Swanson Starling, Robert Foster, and millions of others like them.”
Isabel Wilkerson, The Warmth of Other Suns: The Epic Story of America's Great Migration

“Out of forty-eight boys twenty had never seen the Brooklyn Bridge that was scarcely five minutes’ walk away, three only had been in Central Park, fifteen had known the joy of a ride in a horse-car. The street, with its ash-barrels and its dirt, the river that runs foul with mud, are their domain.”
Jacob A. Riis, How the Other Half Lives: Studies Among the Tenements of New York

Peter Matthiessen
“This bold energetic man of rare intelligence and enterprise must also be understood as a man undone by his own deep flaws. He was known to drink to grievous excess, for example, which often turned him volatile and violent. On the other hand, his evil repute has been wildly exaggerated by careless journalists and their local informants, who seek to embellish their limited acquaintance with a “desperado”; with the result that the real man has been virtually entombed by tale and legend which since his death has petrified as myth. The most lurid view of Mr. Watson is the one perpetuated by the Islanders themselves, for as Dickens observed after his visit to this country, “These Americans do love a scoundrel.” Because his informants tend to imagine that the darkest interpretation is the one the writer wishes to hear, the popular accounts (until now, there have been no others) are invariably sensational as well as speculative: the hard facts, not to speak of “truth,” are missing. Also, this “Bloody Watson” material relates only to his final years in southwest Florida; one rarely encounters any reference to South Carolina, where Edgar Artemas Watson passed his boyhood, nor to the years in the Indian Country (always excepting his alleged role in the slaying of Belle Starr), nor even to the Fort White district of Columbia County in north Florida where he farmed in early manhood, married all three of his wives, and spent almost half of the fifty-five years of his life.”
Peter Matthiessen, Shadow Country

“He believed the future of the nation was at stake, and he returned day after day to fight his war against the “slaveocracy.” And Quincy voters sent him back to Congress again and again. Louisa fretted about his health and safety, but she had lost all influence over him and could do nothing to restrain him. He was unstoppable—a meteor spiraling out of control in the political firmament.”
Harlow Giles Unger, John Quincy Adams

Upton Sinclair
“Jurgis stood upright; trembling with passion, his hands clenched and his arms upraised, his whole soul ablaze with hatred and defiance. Ten thousand curses upon them and their law! Their justice—it was a lie, it was a lie, a hideous, brutal lie, a thing too black and hateful for any world but a world of nightmares. It was a sham and a loathsome mockery. There was no justice, there was no right, anywhere in it—it was only force, it was tyranny, the will and the power, reckless and unrestrained! They”
Upton Sinclair, The Jungle

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