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Prishtina is Ever...
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Behind the Beauti...
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Shakespeare After...
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Sharon's Recent Updates

Sharon rated a book 3 of 5 stars
Salmon Fishing in the Yemen by Paul Torday
Salmon Fishing in the Yemen
by Paul Torday
read in August, 2014
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Good train reading, and it made salmon fishing seem surprisingly interesting. The central concept somehow became more touching because it was never let go without question. Otherwise I felt rather let down by the end, and the characterizations overal...more
Sharon rated a book 4 of 5 stars
Los Angeles by Reyner Banham
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Banham really, really loved Los Angeles, and his enthusiasm is infectious.
Sharon rated a book 5 of 5 stars
Bel Canto by Ann Patchett
Bel Canto
by Ann Patchett
read in July, 2014
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Sharon rated a book 3 of 5 stars
Steal Like an Artist by Austin Kleon
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Mostly this book was a relief because it confirmed that I'm not a total screw-up when it comes to my creative life. It could use some more concrete exercises, in my opinion.
Sharon wants to read
Eleanor and Park by Rainbow Rowell
Eleanor and Park
by Rainbow Rowell (Goodreads Author)
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Sharon rated a book 5 of 5 stars
The Golden Notebook by Doris Lessing
The Golden Notebook
by Doris Lessing
read in June, 2014
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I picked this up for two francs in a secondhand store in Lausanne. I'd heard of the author (my book club read The Good Terrorist and thought two francs, why not.

I would cautiously label this book magnificent, though I find it almost laughable that L...more
Sharon rated a book 3 of 5 stars
The Silent World of Nicholas Quinn by Colin Dexter
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A few too many false steps and confusions at the last minute for my taste. Inspector Morse as a character did not quite have the charisma to carry the book. Otherwise, a neat little package.
Sharon wants to read
The Golden Notebook by Doris Lessing
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Sharon rated a book 4 of 5 stars
The Night Circus by Erin Morgenstern
The Night Circus
by Erin Morgenstern
read in June, 2014
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A love story, but mostly about the love for a place, an idea, and a world-within-a-world. Very intricate.
Sharon rated a book 2 of 5 stars
Norwegian Wood by Haruki Murakami
Norwegian Wood
by Haruki Murakami
read in June, 2014
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Murakami writes women like he's never actually met one.
More of Sharon's books…
Arthur Schopenhauer
“Mostly it is loss which teaches us about the worth of things.”
Arthur Schopenhauer, Parerga and Paralipomena

Margaret Mead
“Having someone wonder where you are when you don't come home at night is a very old human need. ”
Margaret Mead

Charles M. Schulz
“Absence makes the heart grow fonder, but it sure makes the rest of you lonely.”
Charles M. Schulz

Rumi
“You are so weak. Give up to grace.
The ocean takes care of each wave till it gets to shore.
You need more help than you know.”
Rumi, The Essential Rumi

Junot Díaz
“Responding to a moderator at the Sydney Writers Festival in 2008 (video), about the Spanish words in his book:

When all of us are communicating and talking when we’re out in the world, we’ll be lucky if we can understand 20 percent of what people say to us. A whole range of clues, of words, of languages escape us. I mean we’re not perfect, we’re not gods. But on top of that people mis-speak, sometimes you mis-hear, sometimes you don’t have attention, sometimes people use words you don’t know. Sometimes people use languages you don’t know. On a daily basis, human beings are very comfortable with a large component of communication, which is incomprehensibility, incomprehension. We tend to be comfortable with it. But for an immigrant, it becomes very different. What most of us consider normative comprehension an immigrant fears that they’re not getting it because of their lack of mastery in the language.

And what’s a normal component in communication, incomprehension, in some ways for an immigrant becomes a source of deep anxiety because you’re not sure if it’s just incomprehension or your own failures. My sense of writing a book where there is an enormous amount of language that perhaps everyone doesn’t have access to was less to communicate the experience of the immigrant than to communicate the experience that for an immigrant causes much discomfort but that is normative for people. which is that we tend to not understand, not grasp a large part of the language around us. What’s funny is, will Ramona accept incomprehension in our everyday lives and will greet that in a book with enormous fury. In other words what we’re comfortable with out in the outside world, we do not want to encounter in our books.

So I’m constantly, people have come to me and asked me… is this, are you trying to lock out your non-Dominican reader, you know? And I’m like, no? I assume any gaps in a story and words people don’t understand, whether it’s the nerdish stuff, whether it’s the Elvish, whether it’s the character going on about Dungeons and Dragons, whether it’s the Dominican Spanish, whether it’s the sort of high level graduate language, I assume if people don’t get it that this is not an attempt for the writer to be aggressive. This is an attempt for the writer to encourage the reader to build community, to go out and ask somebody else. For me, words that you can’t understand in a book aren’t there to torture or remind people that they don’t know. I always felt they were to remind people that part of the experience of reading has always been collective. You learn to read with someone else. Yeah you may currently practice it in a solitary fashion, but reading is a collective enterprise. And what the unintelligible in a book does is to remind you how our whole, lives we’ve always needed someone else to help us with reading.”
Junot Díaz

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