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Lord Jim
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The Dream of the ...
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Desert Solitaire
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Harajyuku's Recent Updates

Harajyuku wants to read
The Bridge of San Luis Rey by Thornton Wilder
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Harajyuku rated a book 3 of 5 stars
Mort by Terry Pratchett
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If Not, Winter by Sappho
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To the Lighthouse by Virginia Woolf
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Harajyuku rated a book 5 of 5 stars
The Road by Cormac McCarthy
The Road
by Cormac McCarthy
read in March, 2015
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"If he is not the word of God God never spoke."

I read and stopped reading The Road in increments decided by the crawly feeling of weeping that inched its way up my cheekbones. This book was hard to bear. Not complex, but beautiful in its sameness, li
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Harajyuku rated a book 5 of 5 stars
The Heart of Thomas by Moto Hagio
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It took me ages to read this. I started and then forgot it at least three times before it finally took. And holy god but was it worth it. It is a magnificent, harrowing and incredibly delicate melodrama of the sort they really don't make anymore. "He ...more
Harajyuku rated a book 4 of 5 stars
A Drunken Dream and Other Stories by Moto Hagio
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Blood Meridian, or the Evening Redness in the West by Cormac McCarthy
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Undeniably - undeniably!!! - beautiful, but what the fuck?
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Lord Jim by Joseph Conrad
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A Little Life by Hanya Yanagihara
A Little Life
by Hanya Yanagihara (Goodreads Author)
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More of Harajyuku's books…
Truman Capote
“Sorrow and profound fatigue are at the heart of Dewey's silence. It had been his ambition to learn "exactly what happened in that house that night." Twice now he'd been told, and the two versions were very much alike, the only serious discrepancy being that Hickock attributed all four deaths to Smith, while Smith contended that Hickock had killed the two women. But the confessions, though they answered
questions of how and why, failed to satisfy his sense of meaningful design. The crime was a psychological accident, virtually an impersonal act; the victims might as well have been killed by lightning. Except for one thing: they had experienced prolonged terror, they had suffered. And Dewey could not forget their sufferings. Nonetheless, he found it possible to look at the man beside him without anger - with, rather, a measure of sympathy - for Perry Smith's life had been no bed of roses but pitiful, an ugly and lonely progress toward one mirage and then another. Dewey's sympathy, however, was not deep enough to accommodate either forgiveness or mercy. He hoped to see Perry and his partner hanged - hanged back to back.”
Truman Capote, In Cold Blood

E.M. Forster
“The tragedy of preparedness has scarcely been handled, save by the Greeks. Life is indeed dangerous, but not in the way morality would have us believe. It is indeed unmanageable, but the essence of it is not a battle. It is unmanageable because it is a romance, and its essence is romantic beauty.”
E.M. Forster, Howards End

Fyodor Dostoyevsky
“I love mankind, he said, "but I find to my amazement that the more I love mankind as a whole, the less I love man in particular.”
Fyodor Dostoyevsky, The Brothers Karamazov

E.M. Forster
“For that little incident had impressed the three women more than might be supposed. It remained as a goblin footfall, as a hint that all is not for the best in the best of all possible worlds, and that beneath these superstructures of wealth and art there wanders an ill-fed boy, who has recovered his umbrella indeed, but who has left no address behind him, and no name.”
E.M. Forster, Howards End

Natsume Sōseki
“You seem to be under the impression that there is a special breed of bad humans. There is no such thing as a stereotype bad man in this world. Under normal conditions, everybody is more or less good, or, at least, ordinary. But tempt them, and they may suddenly change. That is what is so frightening about men.”
Natsume Sōseki, Kokoro

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Hueyyun
455 books | 53 friends

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Pride and Prejudice by Jane AustenJane Eyre by Charlotte BrontëThe Picture of Dorian Gray by Oscar WildeWuthering Heights by Emily BrontëGreat Expectations by Charles Dickens
Penguin Clothbound Classics
59 books — 161 voters


2012 Reading Challenge
Harajyuku
Harajyuku has completed her goal of reading 52 books for the 2012 Reading Challenge!
 
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2013 Reading Challenge
Harajyuku
Harajyuku has completed her goal of reading 52 books for the 2013 Reading Challenge!
 
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Quizzes and Trivia

questions answered:
2980 (1.4%)

correct:
2361 (79.2%)

skipped:
10 (0.3%)

4114 out of 3200575

streak:
2

best streak:
29

questions added:
1



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