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The Dream of the ...
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Desert Solitaire
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Four Texts on Soc...
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Harajyuku's Recent Updates

Harajyuku wants to read
The Iron Dragon's Daughter by Michael Swanwick
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The Lost City of Faar by D.J. MacHale
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The Merchant of Death by D.J. MacHale
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Abarat by Clive Barker
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Fires on the Plain by Shōhei Ōoka
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Where I'm Calling From by Raymond Carver
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Like being in a train, and looking out the window into some 3000 houses, 3000 lives. Favorites are "So Much Water So Close to Home," "A Small, Good Thing," "A Serious Talk," "Nobody Said Anything," and "What We Talk About When We Talk About Love."
Harajyuku wants to read
The Aeneid by Virgil
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Makers of Rome by Plutarch
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Burmese Days by George Orwell
Burmese Days
by George Orwell
read in July, 2014
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The Heart Is a Lonely Hunter by Carson McCullers
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More of Harajyuku's books…
Truman Capote
“Sorrow and profound fatigue are at the heart of Dewey's silence. It had been his ambition to learn "exactly what happened in that house that night." Twice now he'd been told, and the two versions were very much alike, the only serious discrepancy being that Hickock attributed all four deaths to Smith, while Smith contended that Hickock had killed the two women. But the confessions, though they answered
questions of how and why, failed to satisfy his sense of meaningful design. The crime was a psychological accident, virtually an impersonal act; the victims might as well have been killed by lightning. Except for one thing: they had experienced prolonged terror, they had suffered. And Dewey could not forget their sufferings. Nonetheless, he found it possible to look at the man beside him without anger - with, rather, a measure of sympathy - for Perry Smith's life had been no bed of roses but pitiful, an ugly and lonely progress toward one mirage and then another. Dewey's sympathy, however, was not deep enough to accommodate either forgiveness or mercy. He hoped to see Perry and his partner hanged - hanged back to back.”
Truman Capote, In Cold Blood

James Joyce
“He did not want to play. He wanted to meet in the real world the unsubstantial image which his soul so constantly beheld. He did not know where to seek it or how, but a premonition which led him on told him that this image would, without any overt act of his, encounter him. They would meet quietly as if they had known each other and had made their tryst, perhaps at one of the gates or in some more secret place. They would be alone, surrounded by darkness and silence: and in that moment of supreme tenderness he would be transfigured.
He would fade into something impalpable under her eyes and then in a moment he would be transfigured. Weakness and timidity and inexperience would fall from him in that magic moment.”
James Joyce, A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man

Fyodor Dostoyevsky
“I believe like a child that suffering will be healed and made up for, that all the humiliating absurdity of human contradictions will vanish like a pitiful mirage, like the despicable fabrication of the impotent and infinitely small Euclidean mind of man, that in the world's finale, at the moment of eternal harmony, something so precious will come to pass that it will suffice for all hearts, for the comforting of all resentments, for the atonement of all the crimes of humanity, for all the blood that they've shed; that it will make it not only possible to forgive but to justify all that has happened.”
Fyodor Dostoyevsky, The Brothers Karamazov

Vladimir Nabokov
“And yet I have been fashioned so painstakingly,' thought Cincinnatus as he wept in the darkness. 'The curvature of my spine has been calculated so well, so mysteriously. I feel, tightly rolled up in my calves, so many miles that I could yet run in my lifetime. My head is so comfortable.' A clock struck a half, pertaining to some unknown hour. (Invitation to a beheading)”
Vladimir Nabokov

Sōseki Natsume
“You seem to be under the impression that there is a special breed of bad humans. There is no such thing as a stereotype bad man in this world. Under normal conditions, everybody is more or less good, or, at least, ordinary. But tempt them, and they may suddenly change. That is what is so frightening about men.”
Sōseki Natsume, Kokoro

Stefani...
251 books | 13 friends

William
1,591 books | 469 friends

Jasmine
1,186 books | 8 friends

Alana
58 books | 7 friends

Clancy
254 books | 2 friends

John Pa...
448 books | 71 friends

David Nagy
22 books | 36 friends

Colin B...
584 books | 59 friends

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2012 Reading Challenge
Harajyuku
Harajyuku has completed her goal of reading 52 books for the 2012 Reading Challenge!
 
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2013 Reading Challenge
Harajyuku
Harajyuku has completed her goal of reading 52 books for the 2013 Reading Challenge!
 
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correct:
2359 (79.2%)

skipped:
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3894 out of 2654048

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