Katie Martin’s Profile

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The Leopard by Giuseppe Tomasi di Lampedusa
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The Wishing-Chair Again by Enid Blyton
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Fifth Formers of St Clare's by Enid Blyton
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The Mystery of the Burnt Cottage by Enid Blyton
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Adventures of the Wishing Chair by Enid Blyton
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The Third Form at St. Clare's by Pamela Cox
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The O'Sullivan Twins by Enid Blyton
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The Secret Seven by Enid Blyton
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Claudine at St Clare's by Enid Blyton
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The Secret Island by Enid Blyton
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More of Katie's books…
George Eliot
“I should like to make life beautiful--I mean everybody's life. And then all this immense expense of art, that seems somehow to lie outside life and make it no better for the world, pains one. It spoils my enjoyment of anything when I am made to think that most people are shut out from it."

I call that the fanaticism of sympathy," said Will, impetuously. "You might say the same of landscape, of poetry, of all refinement. If you carried it out you ought to be miserable in your own goodness, and turn evil that you might have no advantage over others. The best piety is to enjoy--when you can. You are doing the most then to save the earth's character as an agreeable planet. And enjoyment radiates. It is of no use to try and take care of all the world; that is being taken care of when you feel delight--in art or in anything else. Would you turn all the youth of the world into a tragic chorus, wailing and moralising over misery? I suspect that you have some false belief in the virtues of misery, and want to make your life a martyrdom.”
George Eliot, Middlemarch

Daniel Handler
“ But there was more, as there always is when the love goes. She was haunted, naturally. Otherwise what is the point, why leave your rickety house, and why this yo-yo world giving us things and yanking them back?”
Daniel Handler, Adverbs

George Eliot
“the effect of her being on those around her was incalculably diffusive: for the growing good of the world is partly dependent on unhistoric acts; and that things are not so ill with you and me as they might have been, is half owing to the number who lived faithfully a hidden life, and rest in unvisited tombs.”
George Eliot, Middlemarch

Daniel Handler
“Love can smack you like a seagull, and pour all over your feet like junk mail.”
Daniel Handler, Adverbs

Daniel Handler
“The window rattles without you, you bastard. The trees are the cause, rattling in the wind, you jerk, the wind scraping those leaves and twigs against my window. They'll keep doing this, you terrible husband, and slowly wear away our entire apartment building. I know all these facts about you and there is no longer any use for them. What will I do with your license plate number, and where you hid the key outside so we'd never get locked out of this shaky building? What good does it do me, your pants size and the blue cheese preference for dressing? Who opens the door in the morning now, and takes the newspaper out of the plastic bag when it rains? I'll never get back all the hours I was nice to your parents. I nudge my cherry tomatoes to the side of the plate, bastard, but no one is waiting there with a fork to eat them. I miss you and I love you, bastard bastard bastard, come and clean the onion skins out of the crisper and trim back the tree so I can sleep at night.”
Daniel Handler, Adverbs

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Anna Karenina by Leo Tolstoy
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