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Teaching for Tomo...
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Horns
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Autumn of the Grove is now friends with Robert Gillman
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Breakfast of Champions by Kurt Vonnegut
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Foundation by Isaac Asimov
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It's Kind of a Funny Story by Ned Vizzini
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Hellboy by Christopher Golden
Hellboy: Odd Jobs
by Christopher Golden (Goodreads Author)
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Women of the Asylum by Jeffrey L. Geller
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Collected Poems 1947-1997 by Allen Ginsberg
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Persepolis, Volume 1 by Marjane Satrapi
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Teaching for Tomorrow by Ted McCain
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Horns by Joe Hill
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More of Autumn's books…
Leo Buscaglia
“Even after centuries of human interacting, children still continue to rebel against their parents and siblings. Young marrieds look upon their in-laws and parents as obstacles to their independence and growth. Parents view their children as selfish ingrates. Husbands desert their wives and seek greener fields elsewhere. Wives form relationships with heroes of soap operas who vicariously bring excitement and romance into their empty lives. Workers often hate their bosses and co-workers and spend miserable hours with them, day after day. On a larger scale, management cannot relate with labour. Each accuses the other of unreasonable self-interests and narrow-mindedness. Religious groups often become entrapped, each in a provincial dogma resulting in hate and vindictiveness in the name of God. Nations battle blindly, under the shadow of the world annihilation, for the realization of their personal rights. Members of these groups blame rival groups for their continual sense of frustration, impotence, lack of progress and communication. We have obviously not learned much over the years. We have not paused long enough to consider the simple truth that we humans are not born with particular attitudinal sets regarding other persons, we are taught into them. We are the future generation's teachers. We are, therefore, the perpetrators of the confusion and alienation we abhor and which keeps us impotent in finding new alternatives. It is up to us to diligently discover new solutions and learn new patterns of relating, ways more conducive to growth, peace, hope and loving coexistence. Anything that is learned can be unlearned and relearned. In this process called change lies our real hope.”
Leo Buscaglia, Loving Each Other

Stephen King
“Oh, about beer I never lie,’ Crandall said. ‘A man who lies about beer makes enemies.”
Stephen King, Pet Sematary

Charlotte Brontë
“When once more alone, I reviewed the information I had got; looked into my heart, examined its thoughts and feelings, and endeavored to bring back with a strict hand such as had been straying through imagination's boundless and trackless waste, into the safe fold of common sense.”
Charlotte Brontë, Jane Eyre

Charlotte Brontë
“I seem to have gathered up a stray lamb in my arms: you wandered out of the fold to seek your shepherd, did you, Jane?”
Charlotte Brontë, Jane Eyre

Charlotte Brontë
“You transfix me quite.”
Charlotte Brontë