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The Name of the Rose
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Called Out of Dar...
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The New Book of F...
Nannalys rated a book 5 of 5 stars
by Lewis Turco (Goodreads Author)
recommended for: POETS
read in January, 1969
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Nannalys Nannalys said: " Unendingly useful. Have had an older copy of this since my grad school days! "

 

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Nannalys rated a book 3 of 5 stars
Mirror Image by Sandra Brown
Mirror Image
by Sandra Brown (Goodreads Author)
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The Naked Consumer by Erik Larson
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In the Garden of Beasts by Erik Larson
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Homegrown and Handmade by Deborah Niemann
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Relaxing the Writer by Amber Polo
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Wordcatcher by Phil Cousineau
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The Winter Ghosts by Kate Mosse
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The Daisy Field by Amy Sutton
The Daisy Field
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The Deadfall Project by Brett James
The Deadfall Project
by Brett James (Goodreads Author)
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Sacred Adventure by William C. Graham
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More of Nannalys's books…
Hilary Mantel
“It is magnificent. At the moment of impact, the king's eyes are open, his body braced for the atteint; he takes the blow perfectly, its force absorbed by a body securely armoured, moving in the right direction, moving at the right speed. His colour does not alter. His voice does not shake.

"Healthy?" he says. "Then I thank God for his favour to us. As I thank you, my lords, for this comfortable intelligence."

He thinks, Henry has been rehearsing. I suppose we all have.

The king walks away towards his own rooms. Says over his shoulder, "Call her Elizabeth. Cancel the jousts.”
Hilary Mantel, Wolf Hall

N. Scott Momaday
“At first she thought the writing would be easy. She was extremely confident in her ability to dream, to imagine, and she supposed that expressing her dreams in words, in writing, would be entirely natural, like drawing breath. She had read widely from the time she was a child, and she knew how to recognize something that was well written. She admired certain lines and passages so much that she had taken complete possession of them and committed them to memory. She could recite “The Gettysburg Address” and “The Twenty-Third Psalm.” She could recite “Jabberwocky” and Emily Dickinson’s “Further in summer that the birds” and Wallace Stevens’s “Sunday Morning.” She knew by heart the final paragraph of Joyce’s “The Dead,” and if challenged she could say in whole the parts of both Romeo and Juliet. And she knew many Kiowa stories and many long prayers in Navajo. These were not feats of memory in the ordinary sense; it was simply that she attended to these things so closely that they became a part of her most personal experience. She had assumed them, appropriated them to her being.
But to write! She discovered that was something else again.”
N. Scott Momaday, Ancient Child

Hilary Mantel
“Some say the Tudors transcend this history, bloody and demonic as it is: that they descend from Brutus through the line of Constantine, son of St Helena, who was a Briton. Arthur, High King of Britain, was Constantine's grandson. He married up to three women, all called Guinevere, and his tomb is at Glastonbury, but you must understand that he is not really dead, only waiting his time to come again.

His blessed descendant, Prince Arthur of England, was born in the year 1486, eldest son of Henry, the first Tudor king. This Arthur married Katharine the princess of Aragon, died at fifteen and was buried in Worcester Cathedral. If he were alive now, he would be King of England. His younger brother Henry would likely be Archbishop of Canterbury, and would not (at least, we devoutly hope not) be in pursuit of a woman of whom the cardinal hears nothing good: a woman to whom, several years before the dukes walk in to despoil him, he will need to turn his attention; whose history, before ruin seizes him, he will need to comprehend.

Beneath every history, another history.”
Hilary Mantel, Wolf Hall

William W.
155 books | 139 friends

Pamela
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Barb
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Bonny
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