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The Orphan Master...
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Paddle Your Own C...
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Eat and Run: My U...
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Christie is currently reading
The Orphan Master's Son by Adam Johnson
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Shop Class as Soulcraft by Matthew B. Crawford
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Paddle Your Own Canoe by Nick Offerman
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Christie rated a book 5 of 5 stars
Yes Please by Amy Poehler
Yes Please
by Amy Poehler
read in February, 2015
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Christie rated a book 4 of 5 stars
The Snow Child by Eowyn Ivey
The Snow Child
by Eowyn Ivey (Goodreads Author)
read in January, 2015
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This book helped me realize that my favorite genre is magical realism. Her descriptions of terrain (Alaska in winter - swoon), space, magic of the woods, emotions (longing, isolation, hope), were all wonderful and deep. I really feel as if I /went/ s ...more
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Yes Please by Amy Poehler
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Christie rated a book 3 of 5 stars
The Wild Truth by Carine McCandless
The Wild Truth: The Untold Story of Sibling Survival
by Carine McCandless (Goodreads Author)
read in December, 2014
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I really enjoyed learning more about the McCandless household and the process behind Jon Krakauer and Sean Penn's works. The book was a little confused about what it was trying to be at times - balancing backstory, family life, Chris's story, Carine' ...more
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Hyperbole and a Half by Allie Brosh
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Hyperbole and a Half by Allie Brosh
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More of Christie's books…
Jack Kerouac
“Live, travel, adventure, bless, and don't be sorry.”
Jack Kerouac

Chloe Neill
“Have you ever had a moment where you knew, beyond a shadow of a doubt, that you were in the right place?
That you were on the right journey? Maybe the sense that you’d crossed a boundary, jumped a hurdle, and somehow, after facing some unconquerable mountain, found yourself suddenly on the other side of it?
When the night was warm and the wind was cool, and a song carried through the quiet streets around you. When you felt the entire world around you, and you were part of it—of the hum of it—and everything was good.
Contentment, I suppose, is the simple explanation for it. But it seems more than that, thicker than that, some unity of purpose, some sense of being truly, honestly, for that moment, at home.
Those moments never seem to last long enough. The song ends, the breeze stills, the worries and fears creep in again and you’re left trying to move forward, but glancing back at the mountain behind you, wondering how you managed to cross it, afraid you really didn’t—that the bulk and shadow over your shoulder might evaporate and re-form before you, and you’d be faced with the burden of crossing it again.
The song ends, and you stare at the quiet, dark house in front of you, and you grasp the doorknob, and walk back into your life.”
Chloe Neill

J.R.R. Tolkien
“And suddenly first one and then another began to sing as they played, deep-throated singing of the dwarves in the deep places of their ancient homes; and this is like a fragment of their song, if it can be like their song without their music. [...]As they sang the hobbit felt the love of beautiful things made by hands and by cunning and by magic moving through him, a fierce and jealous love, the desire of the hearts of dwarves. Then something Tookish woke up inside him, and he wished to go and see the great mountains, and hear the pine-trees and the waterfalls, and explore the caves, and wear a sword instead of a walking-stick. He looked out of the window. The stars were out in a dark sky above the trees. He thought of the jewels of the dwarves shining in dark caverns. Suddenly in the wood beyond The Water a flame leapt up - probably somebody lighting a wood-fire-and he thought of plundering dragons settling on his quiet Hill and kindling it all to flames. He shuddered; and very quickly he was plain Mr. Baggins of Bag-End, Under-Hill, again. He got up trembling.”
J.R.R. Tolkien, The Hobbit

Douglas Adams
“I may not have gone where I intended to go, but I think I have ended up where I needed to be.”
Douglas Adams, The Long Dark Tea-Time of the Soul

E.L. Konigsburg
“I could tell that she felt happy.  Happiness is excitement that has found a settling down place, but there is always a little corner that keeps flapping around.”
E.L. Konigsburg

46680 Librarian LAAADIES! — 6 members — last activity Jul 22, 2011 01:07PM
Librarians DO read books. Or, at least they used to. Before library school. So let's try to again!
99712 Green Mountain Book Award — 20 members — last activity Mar 27, 2013 05:44PM
This is the ninth year of the Green Mountain Book Award, a reader's choice award for students in grades 9-12. Co-sponsored by the Vermont Department o ...more
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