Declan

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The Bully Pulpit:...
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Reading with Mean...
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All Shot Up: The ...
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See all 4 books that Declan is reading…

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The Bully Pulpit by Doris Kearns Goodwin
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How Not to Be Wrong by Jordan Ellenberg
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I won't be wrong any less often because of this book, but I will have an excellent explanation of why. I loved this book!
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How Not to Be Wrong by Jordan Ellenberg
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The Night Circus by Erin Morgenstern
The Night Circus
by Erin Morgenstern
read in July, 2016
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I like it despite the slow moving plot. Seems to be a book about fandom and authors, about people participating in a world created by some one else, that they don't fully understand but want desperately to be a greater part of.
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The Golem and the Jinni by Helene Wecker
The Golem and the Jinni (The Golem and the Jinni, #1)
by Helene Wecker (Goodreads Author)
read in July, 2016
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I really liked this.
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The Night Circus by Erin Morgenstern
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Eleanor & Park by Rainbow Rowell
Eleanor & Park
by Rainbow Rowell (Goodreads Author)
read in July, 2016
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This was good. I'm not sure if it's for teens or nostalgic adults. Romeo and Juliette flipped inside out.
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The Golem and the Jinni by Helene Wecker
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David Copperfield by Charles Dickens
David Copperfield
by Charles Dickens
read in June, 2016
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Good people are good, band people are bad, class privilege even works for orphans.
More of Declan's books…
“five suggestions that can work to open mathematics tasks and increase their potential for learning: Open up the task so that there are multiple methods, pathways, and representations. Include inquiry opportunities. Ask the problem before teaching the method. Add a visual component and ask students how they see the mathematics. Extend the task to make it lower floor and higher ceiling. Ask students to convince and reason; be skeptical.”
Jo Boaler, Mathematical Mindsets: Unleashing Students' Potential through Creative Math, Inspiring Messages and Innovative Teaching

“The researchers found that when students were given problems to solve, and they did not know methods to solve them, but they were given opportunity to explore the problems, they became curious, and their brains were primed to learn new methods, so that when teachers taught the methods, students paid greater attention to them and were more motivated to learn them. The researchers published their results with the title “A Time for Telling,” and they argued that the question is not “Should we tell or explain methods?” but “When is the best time do this?”
Jo Boaler, Mathematical Mindsets: Unleashing Students' Potential through Creative Math, Inspiring Messages and Innovative Teaching

“School leaders need to stop creating schools that attempt to lock in prior achievement and experiences (such as by using tracking), and instead be evidence-informed about the talents and growth of all students by welcoming diversity and being accountable for all (regardless of the teachers’ and schools’ expectations).”
John A.C. Hattie, Visible Learning for Teachers: Maximizing Impact on Learning

“The game is played by partners. Each child has a blank 100 grid. The first partner rolls two number dice. The numbers that come up are the numbers the child uses to make an array on their 100 grid. They can put the array anywhere on the grid, but the goal is to fill up the grid to get it as full as possible. After the player draws the array on their grid, she writes in the number sentence that describes the grid. The game ends when both players have rolled the dice and cannot put any more arrays on the grid”
Jo Boaler, Mathematical Mindsets: Unleashing Students' Potential through Creative Math, Inspiring Messages and Innovative Teaching

“The aim is to get the students actively involved in seeking this evidence: their role is not simply to do tasks as decided by teachers, but to actively manage and understand their learning gains. This includes evaluating their own progress, being more responsible for their learning, and being involved with peers in learning together about gains in learning. If students are to become active evaluators of their own progress, teachers must provide the students with appropriate feedback so that they can engage in this task. Van den Bergh, Ros, and Beijaard (2010: 3) describe the task thus: Fostering active learning seems a very challenging and demanding task for teachers, requiring knowledge of students’ learning processes, skills in providing guidance and feedback and classroom management. The need is to engage students in this same challenging and demanding task. The suggestion in this chapter is to start lessons with helping students to understand the intention of the lesson and showing them what success might look like at the end. Many times, teachers look for the interesting beginning to a lesson – for the hook, and the motivating question. Dan Willingham (2009) has provided an excellent argument for not thinking in this way. He advocates starting with what the student is likely to think about. Interesting hooks, demonstrations, fascinating facts, and likewise may seem to be captivating (and often are), but he suggests that there are likely to be other parts of the lesson that are more suitable for the attention-grabber. The place for the attention-grabber is more likely to be at the end of the lesson, because this will help to consolidate what has been learnt. Most importantly,Willingham asks teachers to think long and hard about how to make the connection between the attention-grabber and the point that it is designed to make; preferably, that point will be the main idea from the lesson. Having too many open-ended activities (discovery learning, searching the Internet, preparing PowerPoint presentations) can make it difficult to direct students’ attention to that which matters – because they often love to explore the details, the irrelevancies, and the unimportant while doing these activities. One of Willingham's principles is that any teaching method is most useful when there is plenty of prompt feedback about whether the student is thinking about a problem in the right way. Similarly, he promotes the notion that assignments should be primarily about what the teacher wants the students to think about (not about demonstrating ‘what they know’). Students are very good at ignoring what you say (‘I value connections, deep ideas, your thoughts’) and seeing what you value (corrections to the grammar, comments on referencing, correctness or absence of facts). Thus teachers must develop a scoring rubric for any assignment before they complete the question or prompts, and show the rubric to the students so that they know what the teacher values. Such formative feedback can reinforce the ‘big ideas’ and the important understandings, and help to make the investment of”
John A.C. Hattie, Visible Learning for Teachers: Maximizing Impact on Learning

7629 U-City Readers — 6 members — last activity Aug 19, 2008 01:36PM
This is a group for students and staff of University City School District in University City, MO.
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The Things They Carried by Tim O'Brien
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