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Millie rated a book 5 of 5 stars
If I Stay by Gayle Forman
If I Stay (If I Stay, #1)
by Gayle Forman (Goodreads Author)
read in August, 2014
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From that time on, the world was hers for the reading. She would never be lonely again, never miss the lack of intimate friends. Books became her friends and there was one for every mood. There was poetry for quiet companionship. There was adventure when she tired of quiet hours. There would be love stories when she came into adolescence and when she wanted to feel a closeness to someone she could read a biography. On that day when she first knew she could read, she made a vow to read one book a day as long as she lived.Betty Smith
Millie rated a book 3 of 5 stars
Love Letters by Debbie Macomber
Love Letters: A Rose Harbor Novel (Rose Harbor 3)
by Debbie Macomber (Goodreads Author)
read in August, 2014
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Love Letters by Debbie Macomber
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Things We Know by Heart by Jessi Kirby
Things We Know by Heart
by Jessi Kirby (Goodreads Author)
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Millie rated a book 5 of 5 stars
To All the Boys I've Loved Before by Jenny Han
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To All the Boys I've Loved Before by Jenny Han
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Millie rated a book 4 of 5 stars
The Unpredictable Consequences of Love by Jill Mansell
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Millie rated a book 5 of 5 stars
Fangirl by Rainbow Rowell
Fangirl
by Rainbow Rowell (Goodreads Author)
read in July, 2014
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Millie rated a book 4 of 5 stars
Isla and the Happily Ever After by Stephanie Perkins
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Robert McCammon
“You know, I do believe in magic. I was born and raised in a magic time, in a magic town, among magicians. Oh, most everybody else didn’t realize we lived in that web of magic, connected by silver filaments of chance and circumstance. But I knew it all along. When I was twelve years old, the world was my magic lantern, and by its green spirit glow I saw the past, the present and into the future. You probably did too; you just don’t recall it. See, this is my opinion: we all start out knowing magic. We are born with whirlwinds, forest fires, and comets inside us. We are born able to sing to birds and read the clouds and see our destiny in grains of sand. But then we get the magic educated right out of our souls. We get it churched out, spanked out, washed out, and combed out. We get put on the straight and narrow and told to be responsible. Told to act our age. Told to grow up, for God’s sake. And you know why we were told that? Because the people doing the telling were afraid of our wildness and youth, and because the magic we knew made them ashamed and sad of what they’d allowed to wither in themselves.

After you go so far away from it, though, you can’t really get it back. You can have seconds of it. Just seconds of knowing and remembering. When people get weepy at movies, it’s because in that dark theater the golden pool of magic is touched, just briefly. Then they come out into the hard sun of logic and reason again and it dries up, and they’re left feeling a little heartsad and not knowing why. When a song stirs a memory, when motes of dust turning in a shaft of light takes your attention from the world, when you listen to a train passing on a track at night in the distance and wonder where it might be going, you step beyond who you are and where you are. For the briefest of instants, you have stepped into the magic realm.

That’s what I believe.

The truth of life is that every year we get farther away from the essence that is born within us. We get shouldered with burdens, some of them good, some of them not so good. Things happen to us. Loved ones die. People get in wrecks and get crippled. People lose their way, for one reason or another. It’s not hard to do, in this world of crazy mazes. Life itself does its best to take that memory of magic away from us. You don’t know it’s happening until one day you feel you’ve lost something but you’re not sure what it is. It’s like smiling at a pretty girl and she calls you “sir.” It just happens.

These memories of who I was and where I lived are important to me. They make up a large part of who I’m going to be when my journey winds down. I need the memory of magic if I am ever going to conjure magic again. I need to know and remember, and I want to tell you.”
Robert McCammon, Boy's Life

“From that time on, the world was hers for the reading. She would never be lonely again, never miss the lack of intimate friends. Books became her friends and there was one for every mood. There was poetry for quiet companionship. There was adventure when she tired of quiet hours. There would be love stories when she came into adolescence and when she wanted to feel a closeness to someone she could read a biography. On that day when she first knew she could read, she made a vow to read one book a day as long as she lived.”
Betty Smith, A Tree Grows in Brooklyn

“People are like cities: We all have alleys and gardens and secret rooftops and places where daisies sprout between the sidewalk cracks, but most of the time all we let each other see is is a postcard glimpse of a skyline or a polished square. Love lets you find those hidden places in another person, even the ones they didn't know were there, even the ones they wouldn't have thought to call beautiful themselves.”
Hilary T. Smith, Wild Awake

Claudia Gray
“It’s funny—when people call you “shy,” they usually smile. Like it’s cute, some funny little habit you’ll
grow out of when you’re older, like the gaps in your grin when your baby teeth fall out. If they knew
how it felt—really being shy, not just unsure at first—they wouldn’t smile. Not if they knew how the
feeling knots up your stomach or makes your palms sweat or robs you of the ability to say anything that
makes sense. It’s not cute at all.”
Claudia Gray, Evernight

Stephen Chbosky
“And all the books you've read have been read by other people. And all the songs you've loved have been heard by other people. And that girl that's pretty to you is pretty to other people. and that if you looked at these facts when you were happy, you would feel great because you are describing 'unity.”
Stephen Chbosky, The Perks of Being a Wallflower

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