Paul Burry’s Profile

Sign in to Goodreads to learn more about Paul.

http://ischooler.wordpress.com/




Mother Night
Paul Burry is currently reading
bookshelves: currently-reading
Rate this book
Clear rating

 
Gone Girl
Paul Burry is currently reading
by Gillian Flynn (Goodreads Author)
bookshelves: currently-reading
Rate this book
Clear rating

 
The Year of the F...
Paul Burry is currently reading
by Margaret Atwood (Goodreads Author)
bookshelves: currently-reading
Rate this book
Clear rating

 

Paul's Recent Updates

Paul Burry wants to read
No Place to Hide by Glenn Greenwald
Rate this book
Clear rating
Paul Burry wants to read
The Future of the Mind by Michio Kaku
Rate this book
Clear rating
Paul Burry started reading
Mother Night by Kurt Vonnegut
Rate this book
Clear rating
Paul Burry wants to read 50 books in the 2015 Reading Challenge
3082
Create your own 2015 Reading Challenge »
Paul Burry rated a book 4 of 5 stars
The Divide by Matt Taibbi
Rate this book
Clear rating
Paul Burry is currently reading
Gone Girl by Gillian Flynn
Gone Girl
by Gillian Flynn (Goodreads Author)
Rate this book
Clear rating
Paul Burry is currently reading
The Year of the Flood by Margaret Atwood
Rate this book
Clear rating
Paul Burry rated a book 3 of 5 stars
The Children Act by Ian McEwan
The Children Act
by Ian McEwan
read in October, 2014
Rate this book
Clear rating
Paul Burry is currently reading
The Divide by Matt Taibbi
Rate this book
Clear rating
Paul Burry is currently reading
The Children Act by Ian McEwan
Rate this book
Clear rating
More of Paul's books…
Ian McEwan
“Quantum mechanics. What a repository, a dump, of human aspiration it was, the borderland where mathematical rigor defeated common sense, and reason and fantasy irrationally merged. Here the mystically inclined could find whatever they required and claim science as their proof. And for these ingenious men in their spare time, what ghostly and beautiful music it must be--spectral asymmetry, resonances, entanglement, quantum harmonic oscillators--beguiling ancient airs, the harmony of the spheres that might transmute a lead wall into gold and bring into being the engine that ran on virtually nothing, on virtual particles, that emitted no harm and would power the human enterprise as well as save it. Beard was stirred by the yearnings of these lonely men. And why should he think they were lonely? It was not, or not only, condescension that made him think them so. They did not know enough, but they knew too much to have anyone to talk to. What mate waiting down the pub or in the British Legion, what hard-pressed wife with job and kids and housework, was going to follow them down these warped funnels in the space-time continuum, into the wormhole, the shortcut to a single, final answer to the global problem of energy?”
Ian McEwan, Solar

Richard Wagamese
“Benjamin and I sat in the middle of one of the large canoes with our grandmother in the stern, directing us past shoals and through rapids and into magnificent stretches of water. One day the clouds hung low and light rain freckled the slate-grey water that peeled across our bow. The pellets of rain were warm and Benjamin and I caught them on our tongues as our grandmother laughed behind us. Our canoes skimmed along and as I watched the shoreline it seemed the land itself was in motion. The rocks lay lodged like hymns in the breast of it, and the trees bent upward in praise like crooked fingers. It was glorious. Ben felt it too. He looked at me with tears in his eyes, and I held his look a long time, drinking in the face of my brother.”
Richard Wagamese, Indian Horse

Timothy Findley
“In the dark that followed - Lucy said; "where I was born, the trees were always in the sun. And I left that place because it was intolerant of rain. Now, we are here in a place where there are no trees and there is only rain. And I intend to leave this place - because it is intolerant of light. Somewhere - there must be somewhere where darkness and light are reconciled. So I am starting a rumour, here and now, of yet another world. I don't know when it will present itself - I don't know where it will be. But - as with all those other worlds now past when it is ready, I intend to go there.”
Timothy Findley, Not Wanted On The Voyage

Ian McEwan
“That evening he plays with the children, cleans the hamster's cage with them, gets them into their pyjamas, and reads to them three times over, once together, then to Jake on his own, then to Naomi. It is at times like these that his life makes sense. How soothing it is, the scent of clean bedlinen and minty toothpaste breath, and his children's eagerness to hear the adventures of imaginary beings, and how touching, to watch the children's eyes grow heavy as they struggle to hang on to the priceless last minutes of their day, and finally fail.”
Ian McEwan, Sweet Tooth

Martin Amis
“Standing in the nordic nook of the kitchen, I can gaze down at the flimsy-limbed joggers heading south towards the Park. It's nearly as bad as New York. Some of these gasping fatsos, these too-little-too-late artists, they look as though they're running up rising ground, climbing ground. My generation, we started all this. Before, everyone was presumably content to feel like death the whole time. Now they want to feel terrific for ever.”
Martin Amis, Money

18918 Leadership for Librarians — 17 members — last activity Jun 09, 2009 09:35PM
This book club is just a great place to discuss leadership and librarianship. The idea is based off of Ken Haycock's lecture on Leadership Bestsellers ...more
45533 iRead — 8 members — last activity Mar 22, 2011 01:27PM
Reader advisory discussion group for librarians and library students
Misha
1,940 books | 236 friends

David
2,279 books | 403 friends

darce v...
485 books | 33 friends

Leslie
562 books | 36 friends

Carly
466 books | 79 friends

erin
640 books | 108 friends

Willow ...
44 books | 30 friends

poppy
447 books | 102 friends

More friends…
The Great Gatsby by F. Scott FitzgeraldCatch-22 by Joseph HellerThe Catcher in the Rye by J.D. SalingerManufacturing Consent by Noam ChomskySlaughterhouse-Five by Kurt Vonnegut
Books That Changed My World
1,939 books — 1,889 voters


Quizzes and Trivia

questions answered:
1255 (0.6%)

correct:
916 (73.0%)

skipped:
578 (31.5%)

14536 out of 3387993

streak:
0

best streak:
12

questions added:
0



Polls voted on by this member