Jeanenne McCloskey’s Profile

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http://www.mccloskeycounseling.com
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Fear and Trembling
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Infinite Jest
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A Good Man is Har...
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Jeanenne's Recent Updates

Tides by Betsy Cornwell
Tides
by Betsy Cornwell (Goodreads Author)
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Jeanenne McCloskey is now a fan of Goodreads Author Frederick Buechner and Annie Dillard
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The Mad Farmer Poems by Wendell Berry
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Little Black Sheep by Ashley Cleveland
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The Liars' Club by Mary Karr
The Liars' Club
by Mary Karr
read in April, 2013
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Lit by Mary Karr
Lit
by Mary Karr
read in March, 2013
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I absolutely loved this book. What a gift Mary Karr has given us in sharing her story with vulnerability and honesty. I recommend this book for writers, poets, artists. Anyone who struggles with addiction or knows someone who does will love her words...more
Provocations by Søren Kierkegaard
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Mansfield Park by Jane Austen
Mansfield Park
by Jane Austen
read in May, 2011
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Persuasion by Jane Austen
Persuasion
by Jane Austen
read in May, 2011
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More of Jeanenne's books…
John Steinbeck
“She had a dour Presbyterian mind and a code of morals that pinned down and beat the brains out of nearly everything that was pleasant to do.”
John Steinbeck, East of Eden

Joshua Wolf Shenk
“Lincoln's story confounds those who see depression as a collection of symptoms to be eliminated. But it resonates with those who see suffering as a potential catalyst of emotional growth. "What man actually needs," the psychiatrist Victor Frankl argued,"is not a tension-less state but rather the striving and struggling of a worthwhile goal." Many believe that psychological health comes with the relief of distress. But Frankl proposed that all people-- and particularly those under some emotional weight-- need a purpose that will both draw on their talents and transcend their lives. For Lincoln, this sense of purpose was indeed the key that unlocked the gates of a mental prison. This doesn't mean his suffering went away. In fact, as his life became richer and more satisfying, his melancholy exerted a stronger pull. He now responded to that pull by tying it to his newly defined sense of purpose. From a place of trouble, he looked for meaning. He looked at imperfection and sought redemption.”
Joshua Wolf Shenk, Lincoln's Melancholy: How Depression Challenged a President and Fueled His Greatness

J.R.R. Tolkien
“So comes snow after fire, and even dragons have their endings.”
J.R.R. Tolkien, The Hobbit

Wallace Stegner
“Wisdom. . .is knowing what you have to accept.”
Wallace Stegner, Angle of Repose

“Art is so often better at theology than theology is.”
Christian Wiman, My Bright Abyss: Meditation of a Modern Believer
tags: art

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The Chronicles of Narnia by C.S. LewisJane Eyre by Charlotte BrontëLes Misérables by Victor Hugo
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