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William Shakespea...
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The Three Musketeers
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The Well of Lost Plots by Jasper Fforde
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Lost in a Good Book by Jasper Fforde
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Anathem by Neal Stephenson
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The Diamond Age by Neal Stephenson
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Cryptonomicon by Neal Stephenson
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Behind the Scenes at Downton Abbey by Emma Rowley
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The Lady and the Panda by Vicki Croke
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William Shakespeare's The Jedi Doth Return by Ian Doescher
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William Shakespeare's The Empire Striketh Back by Ian Doescher
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William Shakespeare's Star Wars by Ian Doescher
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More of Liz's books…
Margaret Mitchell
“With enough courage, you can do without a reputation.”
Margaret Mitchell

Jane Austen
“Life seems but a quick succession of busy nothings.”
Jane Austen, Mansfield Park

C.S. Lewis
“I believe in Christianity as I believe that the sun has risen: not only because I see it, but because by it I see everything else.”
C.S. Lewis

Jane Austen
“I do not want people to be very agreeable, as it saves me the trouble of liking them a great deal.”
Jane Austen, Jane Austen's Letters

George Bernard Shaw
“The seriousness of throwing over hell whilst still clinging to the Atonement is obvious. If there is no punishment for sin there can be no self-forgiveness for it. If Christ paid our score, and if there is no hell and therefore no chance of our getting into trouble by forgetting the obligation, then we can be as wicked as we like with impunity inside the secular law, even from self-reproach, which becomes mere ingratitude to the Savior. On the other hand, if Christ did not pay our score, it still stands against us; and such debts make us extremely uncomfortable. The drive of evolution, which we call conscience and honor, seizes on such slips, and shames us to the dust for being so low in the scale as to be capable of them. The 'saved' thief experiences an ecstatic happiness which can never come to the honest atheist: he is tempted to steal again to repeat the glorious sensation. But if the atheist steals he has no such happiness. He is a thief and knows that he is a thief. Nothing can rub that off him. He may try to sooth his shame by some sort of restitution or equivalent act of benevolence; but that does not alter the fact that he did steal; and his conscience will not be easy until he has conquered his will to steal and changed himself into an honest man...

Now though the state of the believers in the atonement may thus be the happier, it is most certainly not more desirable from the point of view of the community. The fact that a believer is happier than a sceptic is no more to the point than the fact that a drunken man is happier than a sober one. The happiness of credulity is a cheap and dangerous quality of happiness, and by no means a necessity of life. Whether Socrates got as much happiness out of life as Wesley is an unanswerable question; but a nation of Socrateses would be much safer and happier than a nation of Wesleys; and its individuals would be higher in the evolutionary scale. At all events it is in the Socratic man and not in the Wesleyan that our hope lies now.

Consequently, even if it were mentally possible for all of us to believe in the Atonement, we should have to cry off it, as we evidently have a right to do. Every man to whom salvation is offered has an inalienable natural right to say 'No, thank you: I prefer to retain my full moral responsibility: it is not good for me to be able to load a scapegoat with my sins: I should be less careful how I committed them if I knew they would cost me nothing.'
George Bernard Shaw, Androcles and the Lion

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