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Demons
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Great Expectations
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The Social Contract
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Oct 14, 2011 12:32AM

 

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Joe is now friends with Lorna Matos
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Honoring the Medicine by Ken  Cohen
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The Count of Monte Cristo by Alexandre Dumas
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The unabridged version... Totally worth it. 1000+ pages of gradually building up to a 50-or-so page climax where the worlds of several families fall into utter chaos. What an incredible masterpiece! Certainly a far cry from the romantic ideas I had a...more
Joe wants to read 5 books in the 2014 Reading Challenge
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Demons by Fyodor Dostoyevsky
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Joe is on page 1148 of 1276 of The Count of Monte Cristo
The Count of Monte Cristo
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Principles and Foundations of Health Promotion and Education by Randall R. Cottrell
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This book is a great introduction to health education but not much else. It discusses some basic principles of the field, the organization of the specialty, and goes so far as to actually give practical advice about obtaining future employment as a h...more
Joe rated a book 4 of 5 stars
NMS Emergency Medicine by Scott H. Plantz
NMS Emergency Medicine
by Scott H. Plantz
read in October, 2013
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NMS Emergency Medicine by Scott H. Plantz
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Principles and Foundations of Health Promotion and Education by Randall R. Cottrell
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More of Joe's books…
Leo Tolstoy
“How strange, extraordinary, and joyful it was to her to think that her son - the little son, whose tiny limbs had faintly stirred within her twenty years ago, for whose sake she had so often quarreled with the count, who would spoil him, the little son, who had first learnt to say grusha, and then had learnt to say baba - that that son was now in a foreign land, in strange surroundings, a manly warrior, alone without help or guidance, doing there his proper manly work. All the world-wide experience of ages, proving that children do imperceptibly from the cradle grow up into men, did not exist for the countess. The growth of her son had been for her at every strage of his growth just as extraordinary as though millions of millions of men had not grown up in the same way. Just as, twenty years before, she could not believe that the little creature that was lying somewhere under her heart, would one day cry and learn to talk, now she could not believe that the same little creature could be that strong, brave man, that paragon of sons and of men that, judging by this letter, he was now.”
Leo Tolstoy, War and Peace

Walter M. Miller Jr.
“Perhaps in his loneliness he had acquired the silent conviction that he was 'the last', the one, the only. And, being the last, he ceased to be Benjamin, becoming Israel. And upon his heart had settled the history of five thousand years, no longer remote, but become as the history of his own lifetime. His "I" was the converse of the imperial "We.”
Walter M. Miller Jr., A Canticle for Leibowitz

Ayn Rand
“The three of them set out every morning on adventures of their own kind. Once, an elderly professor of literature, Mrs. Taggart's friend, saw them on top of a pile in a junk yard, dismantling the carcass of an automobile. He stopped, shook his head and said to Francisco, 'A young man of your position ought to spend his time in libraries, absorbing the culture of the world.' 'What do you think I'm doing?' asked Francisco.”
Ayn Rand, Atlas Shrugged

Nikos Kazantzakis
“For I realize today that it is a mortal sin to violate the great laws of nature. We should not hurry, we should not be impatient, but we should confidently obey the eternal rhythm.”
Nikos Kazantzakis, Zorba the Greek

Leo Tolstoy
“Consciously a man lives on his own account in freedom of willbut he serves as an unconscious instrument in bringing about the historical ends of humanity. An act he has once committed is irrecvocable, and that act of his, coinciding in time with millions of acts of others, has an historical value... 'The hearts of kinds are in the hand of God.' The king is the slave of history... Every action that seems to them an act of their own freewill, is in an historical sense not free at all, but in bondage to the whole course of previous history, and predestined from all eternity.”
Leo Tolstoy, War and Peace

998 Russian Readers Club — 912 members — last activity Jul 24, 2014 05:55PM
The place where both russian readers and lovers of russian literature can share their thoughts about russian literature as well as about foreign one,...more
46339 Classics R Us!! :) — 73 members — last activity Apr 18, 2011 03:04PM
This is a group for people who don't usually read classic novels, such as, Pride and Prejudice. We will read all sorts of classic novels, and if you d...more
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