Dianne Warner

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Dianne Warner rated a book it was amazing
Be Frank With Me by Julia Claiborne Johnson
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Saint Anything by Sarah Dessen
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Carry On by Rainbow Rowell
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Dianne Warner rated a book it was amazing
The Goldfinch by Donna Tartt
The Goldfinch
by Donna Tartt
read in December, 2014
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The most brilliant, inspiring book of complex characters, issues and emotions, I've read outside of a few Nineteenth century classics such as The Idiot, or Oliver Twist. Boris can find parallel with Shakespeare's Falstaff. Yet, everything is prescien ...more
Dianne Warner rated a book it was amazing
Imaginary Girls by Nova Ren Suma
Imaginary Girls
by Nova Ren Suma
read in August, 2015
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Highly original and beautifully written. Disturbing
Dianne Warner rated a book it was amazing
Tigers in Red Weather by Liza Klaussmann
Tigers in Red Weather
by Liza Klaussmann (Goodreads Author)
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It is a rare delight to read for the very first time, a GREAT book, full of the nuances of emotional lives and events of history; the actions of interesting compelling and original characters and their unexpected choices. The author seamlessly transi ...more
Dianne Warner and 3 other people liked Emma's review of Life by Committee:
Life by Committee by Corey Ann Haydu
"I struggled to decide what to rate this book but after thinking it over I decided I didn't really enjoy it. I didn't hate it but it wasn't great.

When I first read the blurb I was really intrigued and I was so convinced I'd love it. It definitely m..." Read more of this review »
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The Hundred-Year House by Rebecca Makkai
The Hundred-Year House
by Rebecca Makkai (Goodreads Author)
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Shatter Me by Tahereh Mafi
"WARNING: The proceeding review contains some necessary & unavoidable spoilers. It also contains my honest uncensored thoughts, feelings, and opinions. I don't bite my tongue, and I really did not like this book. So, if you can't handle any of..." Read more of this review »
Shatter Me by Tahereh Mafi
"Oh, friend. Recommend me a book that is good. Something that does not treat its sentences like they're handicapped, something that is not oversaturated with painful, utterly nonsensical metaphors, something that does not contain a useless, befuddl..." Read more of this review »
More of Dianne's books…
Fyodor Dostoyevsky
“Nonetheless, a question remains before us all the same: what is a novelist to do with ordinary, completely "usual" people, and how can he present them to the reader so as to make them at least somewhat interesting? To bypass them altogether in a story is quite impossible, because ordinary people are constantly and for the most part the necessary links in the chain of everyday events; in bypassing them we would thus violate plausibility. To fill novels with nothing but types or even simply, for the sake of interest, with strange and nonexistent people, would be implausible--and perhaps uninteresting as well.”
Fyodor Dostoyevsky, The Idiot

Fyodor Dostoyevsky
“One of them was a young fellow of about twenty-seven, not tall, with black curling hair, and small, grey, fiery eyes. His nose was broad and flat, and he had high cheek bones; his thin lips were constantly compressed into an impudent, ironical—it might almost be called a malicious—smile; but his forehead was high and well formed, and atoned for a good deal of the ugliness of the lower part of his face. A special feature of this physiognomy was its death-like pallor, which gave to the whole man an indescribably emaciated appearance in spite of his hard look, and at the same time a sort of passionate and suffering expression which did not harmonize with his impudent, sarcastic smile and keen, self-satisfied bearing. He wore a large fur—or rather astrachan—overcoat, which had kept him warm all night, while his neighbour had been obliged to bear the full severity of a Russian November night entirely unprepared. His wide sleeveless mantle with a large cape to it—the sort of cloak one sees upon travellers during the winter months in Switzerland or North Italy—was by no means adapted to the long cold journey through Russia, from Eydkuhnen to St. Petersburg.”
Fyodor Dostoyevsky, The Idiot

Fyodor Dostoyevsky
“Nastasha Filippovna,' said Myshkin softly and as it were with compassion, 'I told you just now that I would take your consent as an honor, and that you are doing me an honor, not I you. You smiled at those words, and I heard people laughing about us. I may have expressed myself very absurdly and have been absurd myself, but I thought all the time that I... understood the meaning of honor, and I am sure I spoke the truth. You wanted to ruin yourself just now irrevocably; for you'd never have forgiven yourself for it afterwards. But you are not to blame for anything. Your life cannot be altogether ruined. What does it matter that Rogozhin did come to you and Gavril Ardalionovitch tried to deceive you? Why will you go on dwelling on it? Few people would do what you have done, I tell you that again. As for your meaning to go with Rogozhin, you were ill when you meant to do it. You are ill now, and you had much better go to bed. You would have gone off to be a washerwoman next day; you wouldn't have stayed with Rogozhin. You are proud, Nastasha Filippovna; but perhaps you are so unhappy as really to think yourself to blame. You want a lot of looking after, Nastasha Filippovna. I will look after you. I saw your portrait this morning and I felt as though I recognized a face that I knew. I felt as though you had called to me already... I shall respect you all my life Nastasha Filippovna.”
Fyodor Dostoyevsky, The Idiot

John Fowles
“The dead live."
"How do they live?"
"By love.”
John Fowles, The Magus
tags: dead, love

Fyodor Dostoyevsky
“Towards the end of November, during a thaw, at nine o'clock one morning, a train on the Warsaw and Petersburg railway was approaching the latter city at full speed. The morning was so damp and misty that it was only with great difficulty that the day succeeded in breaking; and it was impossible to distinguish anything more than a few yards away from the carriage windows.”
Fyodor Dostoyevsky, The Idiot

Chris B...
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Gerald
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