Ashley Cale’s Profile

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Seize the Day
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Confessions
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On Prayer And The...
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Ashley's Recent Updates

Ashley Cale rated a book 5 of 5 stars
Fathers and Children (Second Edition) by Ivan Turgenev
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This novel just flows like a meandering river frequented by prominent "dialectical" rapids to break up its serene scenes and cause the reader that pleasant anxiety to turn the page, to find out what will happen next, and to sit for a moment, staring...more
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I Saw It by Maxim Shrayer
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Ashley Cale is currently reading
Fathers and Children (Second Edition) by Ivan Turgenev
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Rudin by Ivan Turgenev
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Russian Thinkers by Isaiah Berlin
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On the Eve by Ivan Turgenev
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Antonina by Evgeniya Tur
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Seize the Day by Saul Bellow
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Ashley Cale rated a book 5 of 5 stars
Dangling Man by Saul Bellow
Dangling Man
by Saul Bellow
read in January, 2014
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5 stars for a deeply thoughtful and short piece of writing. Bellow nestles very interesting elements of what some term a "superfluous man narrative" within the journal of a man waiting for his Army enlistment call-up, living, in downtown Chicago, in...more
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Humboldt's Gift by Saul Bellow
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More of Ashley's books…
Michael Oakeshott
“This, I believe, is the appropriate image of human intercourse -- appropriate because it recognizes the qualities, the diversities, and the proper relationships of human utterances. As civilized human beings, we are the inheritors, neither of an inquiry about ourselves and the world, nor of an accumulating body of information, but of a conversation, begun in the primeval forests and extended and made more articulate in the course of centuries. It is a conversation which goes on both in public and within each of ourselves.”
Michael Oakeshott, Rationalism in Politics and Other Essays

Jean-Jacques Rousseau
“People who know little are usually great talkers, while men who know much say little.”
Jean-Jacques Rousseau

Thomas à Kempis
“Love is a mighty power, a great and complete good; Love alone lightens every burden, and makes the rough places smooth. It bears every hardship as though it were nothing, and renders all bitterness sweet and acceptable. The love of Jesus is noble, and inspires us to great deeds; it moves us always to desire perfection. Love aspires to high things, and is held back by nothing base. Love longs to be free, a stranger to every worldly desire, lest its inner vision become dimmed, and lest worldly self-interest hinder it or ill-fortune cast it down. Nothing is sweeter than love, nothing stronger, nothing higher, nothing wider, nothing more pleasant, nothing fuller or better in heaven or earth; for love is born of God, and can rest only in God above all created things.

Love flies, runs, leaps for joy; it is free and unrestrained. Love gives all for all, resting in One who is highest above all things, from whom every good flows and proceeds. Love does not regard the gifts, but turns to the Giver of all good gifts. Love knows no limits, but ardently transcends all bounds. Love feels no burden, takes no account of toil, attempts things beyond its strength; love sees nothing as impossible, for it feels able to achieve all things. Love therefore does great things; it is strange and effective; while he who lacks love faints and fails.”
Thomas à Kempis, The Inner Life
tags: god, love

John Locke
“Reading furnishes the mind only with materials of knowledge; it is thinking that makes what we read ours.”
John Locke

Alan Bennett
“The best moments in reading are when you come across something - a thought, a feeling, a way of looking at things - which you had thought special and particular to you. And now, here it is, set down by someone else, a person you have never met, someone even who is long dead. And it is as if a hand has come out, and taken yours”
Alan Bennett, The History Boys: The Film

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