Ashley Cale’s Profile

Sign in to Goodreads to learn more about Ashley.


The Loser
Ashley Cale is currently reading
bookshelves: currently-reading
Rate this book
Clear rating

 
Heinrich Von Klei...
Rate this book
Clear rating

 
Measure for Measure
Rate this book
Clear rating

 

Ashley's Recent Updates

Ashley Cale wants to read
A Philosophical Commentary on These Words of the Gospel by Pierre Bayle
Rate this book
Clear rating
Ashley Cale rated a book 5 of 5 stars
Fear by Stefan Zweig
Rate this book
Clear rating
Lovely, lovely, lovely.
I used to avoid adultery narratives, and I'm still not entirely fond of them, but the same elements of fear and pain , guilt and shame, "liberation" and "confinement"--such a large part of certain adultery narratives-- are sha
...more
Ashley Cale wants to read
Crash the Chatterbox by Steven Furtick
Rate this book
Clear rating
Ashley Cale wants to read
Lieutenant Gustl by Arthur Schnitzler
Rate this book
Clear rating
Ashley Cale started reading
The Loser by Thomas Bernhard
Rate this book
Clear rating
Ashley Cale wants to read
Tractatus Logico-Philosophicus by Ludwig Wittgenstein
Rate this book
Clear rating
Ashley Cale wants to read
The Lord Chandos Letter by Hugo von Hofmannsthal
Rate this book
Clear rating
Ashley Cale wants to read
Christus by Henry Wadsworth Longfellow
Rate this book
Clear rating
Ashley Cale wants to read
The Loser by Thomas Bernhard
Rate this book
Clear rating
Ashley Cale rated a book 5 of 5 stars
Michael Kohlhaas by Heinrich von Kleist
Rate this book
Clear rating
More of Ashley's books…
Emily Dickinson
“Hope is the thing with feathers
That perches in the soul
And sings the tune without the words
And never stops at all.”
Emily Dickinson

Michael Oakeshott
“This, I believe, is the appropriate image of human intercourse -- appropriate because it recognizes the qualities, the diversities, and the proper relationships of human utterances. As civilized human beings, we are the inheritors, neither of an inquiry about ourselves and the world, nor of an accumulating body of information, but of a conversation, begun in the primeval forests and extended and made more articulate in the course of centuries. It is a conversation which goes on both in public and within each of ourselves.”
Michael Oakeshott, Rationalism in Politics and Other Essays

Thomas à Kempis
“Love is a mighty power, a great and complete good; Love alone lightens every burden, and makes the rough places smooth. It bears every hardship as though it were nothing, and renders all bitterness sweet and acceptable. The love of Jesus is noble, and inspires us to great deeds; it moves us always to desire perfection. Love aspires to high things, and is held back by nothing base. Love longs to be free, a stranger to every worldly desire, lest its inner vision become dimmed, and lest worldly self-interest hinder it or ill-fortune cast it down. Nothing is sweeter than love, nothing stronger, nothing higher, nothing wider, nothing more pleasant, nothing fuller or better in heaven or earth; for love is born of God, and can rest only in God above all created things.

Love flies, runs, leaps for joy; it is free and unrestrained. Love gives all for all, resting in One who is highest above all things, from whom every good flows and proceeds. Love does not regard the gifts, but turns to the Giver of all good gifts. Love knows no limits, but ardently transcends all bounds. Love feels no burden, takes no account of toil, attempts things beyond its strength; love sees nothing as impossible, for it feels able to achieve all things. Love therefore does great things; it is strange and effective; while he who lacks love faints and fails.”
Thomas à Kempis, The Inner Life
tags: god, love

Thomas Hardy
“That mercy towards one set of creatures was cruelty towards another sickened his sense of harmony. As you got older, and felt yourself to be at the center of your time, and not at a point in its circumference, as you had felt when you were little, you were seized with a sort of shuddering, he perceived. All around you there seemed to be something glaring, garish, rattling, and the noises and glares hit upon the little cell called your life, and shook it, and warped it.”
Thomas Hardy, Jude the Obscure

Thomas à Kempis
“Love feels no burden, thinks nothing of its trouble, attempts what is above its strength, pleads no excuse for impossibility, for it thinks all things are lawful for itself and all things are possible”
Thomas à Kempis

Valenti...
509 books | 26 friends

Tim Floyd
238 books | 49 friends

Aimee G...
0 books | 4 friends

Kat Blo...
180 books | 68 friends

Abigail...
3 books | 38 friends

Jocelyn...
0 books | 103 friends

Nancy
45 books | 9 friends

Rhonda ...
1 book | 4 friends

More friends…


Polls voted on by this member