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The Brothers of G...
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  (page 385 of 821)
"Finished book 2 of 4. Good but not great. Will pick up again after reading something else a bit light." Nov 29, 2012 05:24PM

 

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Pull of the Yew Tree by Pauline Toohey
Pull of the Yew Tree
by Pauline Toohey (Goodreads Author)
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Inferno by Dan Brown
Inferno (Robert Langdon, #4)
by Dan Brown (Goodreads Author)
read in February, 2014
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Templar by Jordan Mechner
Templar
by Jordan Mechner
read in January, 2014
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Kenobi by John Jackson Miller
Kenobi (Star Wars)
by John Jackson Miller (Goodreads Author)
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Crucible by Troy Denning
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Jeffrey Scott is now a fan of S.J. Parris
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Prophecy by S.J. Parris
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Treachery by S.J. Parris
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The Kingmaker's Daughter by Philippa Gregory
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The Omen Machine by Terry Goodkind
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More of Jeffrey's books…
Jonathan Carroll
“When you love someone deeply, you know secrets they haven't told you yet. Or secrets they aren't even aware of themselves. ... She was also the person I wanted to share the trivia of my life with, because that too is part of the magic of concern: Whatever you live is important to them and they will help you through it.”
Jonathan Carroll, Sleeping in Flame

Jonathan Carroll
“Dogs are the kids we've always wanted. They're totally devoted and want to live with you until they die. Not like children who can't wait to take off as soon as they grow up and don't need you anymore.”
Jonathan Carroll, Sleeping in Flame

Neil Gaiman
“May your coming year be filled with magic and dreams and good madness. I hope you read some fine books and kiss someone who thinks you're wonderful, and don't forget to make some art -- write or draw or build or sing or live as only you can. And I hope, somewhere in the next year, you surprise yourself.”
Neil Gaiman

Sharon Kay Penman
“He could still remember how breathtakingly beautiful Eleanor was that day. He'd have been content to gaze into her eyes for hours, trying to decide if they were green with gold flecks or gold with green flecks. She had high, finely sculpted cheekbones, soft, flawless skin he'd burned to touch, and lustrous dark braids entwined with gold-threaded ribbons he yearned to unfasten; he'd have bartered his chances of salvation to bury his face in that glossy, perfumed hair, to wind it around his throat and see it spread out on his pillow. He'd watched, mesmerized, as a crystal raindrop trickled toward the sultry curve of her mouth and wanted nothing in his life so much, before or since, as he wanted her. ”
Sharon Kay Penman, Devil's Brood

“The tragedy of Central Appalachia is that it is becoming more marginalized in American life just when the country needs more than ever what it has to offer. At a time when the bonds of community and family are visibly failing and people feel more alone than ever, and as they are bombarded from all sides with more demands, and with more "data" that they can possibly digest, Appalachia offers a model for a less frenetic and more measured way of life. People of Appalachian descent elsewhere in the nation-and they number many millions-still feel deep ties to some Appalachian hamlet or hollow as to an ancestral homeland, though they may never have even visited it. As they make their way in the big world of getting and spending they know that something valuable has been lost for all they may have gained. That less frenetic way of life is deeply embedded in Appalachian culture, which has proved incredibly tough and enduring. Yet Appalachia has now been so thoroughly bypassed and forgotten that it cannot give, because the rest of America will not take, what could be it's greatest gift.”
Harry M. Caudill, Night Comes to the Cumberlands: A Biography of a Depressed Area

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