Live Video Chat With Barbara Kingsolver

recorded Nov 09, 2012 11:00AM

Enter the giveaway for Flight Behavior
(type q in front of your question to highlight that question in chat)
Patrick Brown:
Oct 11, 2012 03:37PM
Join us on Friday, November 9 at 2pm ET/11 am PT for a live video chat with bestselling author Barbara Kingsolver. We'll be discussing her new book Flight Behavior, as well as her previous work and her life as a writer. The chat will last approximately half an hour, and if you can't watch it live, don't worry, we will record it.

If you have a question for Barbara Kingsolver, please ask it below.
Vy Pham:
Nov 02, 2012 12:20AM
How do you decide on your book titles?
Deanna Chan:
Nov 02, 2012 12:33AM
q I enjoyed Prodigal Summer immensely-- the protagonist and I share a name! I was wondering where you get the inspiration for your great stories?
Michèle Laframboise:
Nov 02, 2012 01:29AM
Not a question: I discovered The Bean Tree a few years ago. Later, I read The Poisonwood Bible, a masterpiece that I strongly recommand for anyone wanting to know more about Congo history, or simply enjoy a good novel... So, a big, warm thank you !
Michelle Edwards:
Nov 02, 2012 02:58AM
q Do you and your family still adhere to the principles of food and eating that you wrote about in Animal, Vegetable, Miracle? I found the book (as well as pretty much everything you've ever written) really inspiring but find it incredibly difficult to stick to my own high standards of what food should be. I just want to know if it has been sustainable for you.
Kirsten:
Nov 02, 2012 03:02AM
q Can you tell us a bit about your daily rhythms and rituals? When do you find time to write (and how much) and how do you balance that with family, home, food, etc? Also do you write for other venues besides your books- magazines, blogs, or newspapers?
Julie Van oosten:
Nov 02, 2012 03:11AM
q Who are your favourite authors and which books have in
Julie Van oosten:
Nov 02, 2012 03:13AM
q. (Oops pressed send accidentially) The last part of my question is, which books have inspired you?
Catherine Dean:
Nov 02, 2012 04:45AM
Am always interested in the writer's space. Stephen King wrote beautifully in his non-fiction On Writing... about how and where he works
Catherine Dean:
Nov 02, 2012 04:46AM
Can you describe for us your work space and how you work?
Catherine Dean:
Nov 02, 2012 04:46AM
q. Can you describe for us your work space and how you work?
Catherine Dean:
Nov 02, 2012 04:47AM
q. Can you speak to how you find that place to enter a story?
Rachel:
Nov 02, 2012 05:33AM
q I read on your website that your ideas for novels often begin with "a question whose answer is not clear to me, but seems vital." (www.barbarakingsolver.com). What question did you have in mind as you were writing "Flight behavior"?
Rachel:
Nov 02, 2012 05:34AM
Also, I recommend everyone check out www.barbarakingsolver.com before asking a question on here - several have already been answered on her website!
Judy Silk:
Nov 02, 2012 07:15AM
Prodigal Summer is my all time favorite fiction. How did you structure the weaving of the stories? I'm an aspiring writer (at 56) and I can't fathom how you did it. The pieces weave together so naturally and unfold so seamlessly. It's breathtaking. Can't wait for your latest. Judy
Rebecca Weaver armes:
Nov 02, 2012 07:21AM
q I'm curious if you've had inquiries to turn any of the books into movies? Is there a particular book that seems to be the "it" book for potential movies?
Book Chick:
Nov 02, 2012 08:08AM
One of my favorite books is The Poisonwood Bible. What kind of research went into it?
Rebecca Silber:
Nov 02, 2012 09:19AM
q When your children were young, how did you juggle motherhood with being a writer?
Carol Soderholm:
Nov 02, 2012 09:31AM
I have enjoyed introducing your books to new readers while working at the bookstore and when I was a librarian. You had me at Bean Trees and every book thereafter! I just wanted to thank you for writing!
Mary Murphy:
Nov 02, 2012 11:28AM
You are one of my favorite writers - I have read all of your books. Who are some of your favorite fiction writers?
Tamara Koester:
Nov 02, 2012 12:10PM
How much has writing "Animal, Vegetable, Miracle" changed your eating and grocery shopping habits to this day? Between reading that and Michael Pollen's "Omnivore's Dilemma", my life will never be the same! I loved the levity you gave while bringing up serious issues.
Lisa Gennusa-O'Connell:
Nov 02, 2012 12:30PM
Prodigal Summer is my number one favorite book. I've given it as a gift to just about everyone important to me. I often think I should write a book one day and probably will, but most likely it will be non-fiction as I love memoirs and think my story needs to be shared eventually. You've written non-fiction (and I've read it)...would you write a memoir in the future?
Lisa Gennusa-O'Connell:
Nov 02, 2012 12:31PM
Oh, and what's the first thing you do when you start writing a book?
Sheila:
Nov 02, 2012 01:05PM
I 'found' you when I lived in Michigan. I moved to KY in 2006. Is Prodigal Summer's location PIne Mountain?
Susan:
Nov 02, 2012 04:03PM
q I had just started reading “Poisonwood Bible” in Oct, 2000 when my husband and I were whisked from Canada to rural South Africa to look at a 4-year job offer. A bit of synchronicity: we were actually in Johannesburg as I read the chapter toward the end of the book entitled ‘Johannesburg’. Your book asked: “What did we do to Africa and how do we feel about it?” What began as a lark of an adventure became, on our return flight, and earnest discussion of shaking up our lives and moving to Africa … inspired, in no small part, by what we had recently read in “Poisonwood Bible”. Four years later I understood in my bones when Rachel says: “You can’t just sashay into the jungle aiming to change it … without expecting the jungle to change you right back.” Those four years were hair-tearing crazy for me, and I wouldn’t have missed it for the world! I never dreamed I would someday be able to say thank you to you in person for a peak experience of my life. Thank you, Barbara Kingsolver. Do you have any idea how many lives (like mine) you have touched in a life-changing significant way with your writings? (rhetorical question!)
Lynne Spreen:
Nov 03, 2012 06:27AM
Do you outline or not? I loved Pigs, Bean Trees and Prodigal Summer. Bean Trees made me cry so hard I couldn't breathe!! Love your work.
Maria Johnson:
Nov 03, 2012 12:17PM
Q: The Lacuna was a beautiful work interweaving history and fiction together. When writing in this manner, does a historical event intrigue you, and invite you to do more research around which you build your fiction, or do you envision a fictional character from a time period, and then look for an event that would provide an effective setting? I have to thank you for writing such a beautiful story and turning me onto Frida Kahlo and all the lovely characters in the book. As a historian, I have a special place in my heart for the "could have been" stories and novels.
Karen Lawson:
Nov 03, 2012 03:14PM
You have a knack for embedding a progressive eco-consciousness so it doesn't lecture. I just finished writing second novel from that perspective, and would like to hear how you avoid "preaching" on matters so close to your heart.you
Shaun Kenney:
Nov 04, 2012 05:03AM
Question: Any plans to return to Tucson to live? We miss not having you here.
Dara Satterfield:
Nov 04, 2012 09:01AM
How did you learn about monarchs that sometimes overwinter in the U.S. rather than Mexico? (I am a monarch ecologist and thrilled you wrote this book!).
Lara McLaughlin:
Nov 04, 2012 05:14PM
Can you speak to what motivated you and continued to nourish your vision for the story as you wrote The Poisonwood Bible, which I believe should become a standard classic of American literature.
Natalie Parker-Lawrence:
Nov 04, 2012 07:58PM
q my students use The Poisonwood Bible as their favorite work to write about on Question #3. Do you believe that students, or any readers really, need a background in allusion--biblical, literary, cultural, mythological, and historical-- to get the most out of your books? i teach so many preliminary notes about African history and the 60's in America which i love and they do too, but what do you do to inspire readers to learn the essential material along the way. Do they look up unknown vocabulary and other items or do they skim or do they give up and stop reading. i tell my students that you like readers who bring something to the relationship, that, even though you don't know them, trust them to have allusion as their second skin if they want to understand all the intense layers of your book. can't wait for the new book!!
Natalie Parker-Lawrence:
Nov 04, 2012 07:58PM
q my students are AP English Literature students in 12th grade, btw!
Joyce Platfoot:
Nov 05, 2012 08:32AM
Prodigal Summer is one of my all time favorite books. I often describe it to curious readers as "lush". What inspired your new book and how is it similar to or different than your past books?
Anne Schmitt:
Nov 05, 2012 11:28AM
I am not sure I will be able to log into the live chat. Will it be available for viewing after?
Vizara:
Nov 06, 2012 07:41AM
Have enjoyed Prodigal Summer, The Lacuna and the Poisonwood Bible. Having grown up in Africa (Rhodesia and Nyasaland) I thought the Poisonwood Bible outstanding. You have captured the essence of Africa. Have you lived in Africa at all? What inspired you to write this?
Kellie:
Nov 06, 2012 02:47PM
q Where did you get your inspiration for The Bean Trees? My class read it and it was very eye-opening to the prejudice of the world. Thanks!
Lara:
Nov 08, 2012 01:52AM
Hi, I'm your Croatian translator of Prodigal Summer. If I knew how to write, I'd like to write like you. Translating is as close as I can get to actually doing it, so even though it's hard, it's also very rewarding, Thank you for making me find the sentences. Q: Would you prefer it if translators were able to communicate with you while they are working on your texts? Would you have some instructions, preferences, etc.?
Kathi Clayton:
Nov 08, 2012 05:58AM
I have enjoyed your work immensely. You have opened my eyes and my mind to just how we are all inter-connected with everything. Ehat we do has consequences to the entire planet. Thank you.
(deleted user):
Nov 08, 2012 08:29AM
When you begin a new writing project, do you research before you begin writing, or along the way as you write?
Sherri:
Nov 08, 2012 09:06AM
Patrick wrote: "Join us on Friday, November 9 at 2pm ET/11 am PT for a live video chat with bestselling author Barbara Kingsolver. We'll be discussing her new book Flight Behavior, as well as her previous work and..."

Were will I find the link for the discussion tomorrow?
Patrick Brown:
Nov 08, 2012 11:49AM
Sherri, the discussion and video are (and will be) here: http://www.goodreads.com/topic/video_...
Poetically Challenged:
Nov 08, 2012 01:53PM
q When you have an idea for a story, how do you begin (i.e., do you outline; do you start with plot, characters,setting)?
Simone:
Nov 08, 2012 02:19PM
q The Poisonwood Bible has just recently been released in a mass market edition, which usually equals good sales. Is that because of expectations due to the release of your new book, or has this title increased in popularity recently? Are bookclubs making a difference in booksales?
Caitlin Lavery:
Nov 08, 2012 06:37PM
I just wanted to say how much I have enjoyed your work and I thank you for putting it out there. You are a beautiful writer and I have been touched by many of your books. Thank you.
Sherri:
Nov 08, 2012 07:26PM
Patrick wrote: "Sherri, the discussion and video are (and will be) here: http://www.goodreads.com/topic/video_..."
Thank you I am excited to tune in!
Steph Donoghue:
Nov 09, 2012 06:53AM
q Animal, Vegetable, Miracle changed my world and constantly inspires me in my local/homegrown ventures. Your narration for the audiobook is outstanding! Will you ever write a sequel or another book of that genre? How's the homestead doing these days?
Irene:
Nov 09, 2012 08:00AM
Do you ever feel stymied artistically because devoted readers view you as a kind of guru of a certain perspective?
Susan Voelker:
Nov 09, 2012 08:04AM
No questions...just looking forward to the chat and want you to know how much I enjoy your books, all of them.
Tucker Farley:
Nov 09, 2012 08:06AM
Q: DO YOU HAVE A READER IN MIND AS YOU WRITE, SOMEONE WHO UNDERSTANDS, OR SOMEONE WHO NEEDS TO UNDERSTAND AND DOESN'T YET?
Autumn Miller:
Nov 09, 2012 08:08AM
The screen is saying "Offline" but it's 11:08...perhaps I'm doing something wrong. Must I do more than press the play arrow? Thank you for any help!
Caitlin Lavery:
Nov 09, 2012 08:10AM
11am Pacific time
Autumn Miller:
Nov 09, 2012 08:11AM
Oh, thank you! I am in the wrong time zone ;-)
Tucker Farley:
Nov 09, 2012 08:25AM
DITTO
Lyn:
Nov 09, 2012 09:19AM
What is your family's favorite aspect about your work and how it affects them individually and as a whole? ~ ty, again!! For your talk in Floyd, VA from quite a few years back. Helped our new library enormousely.
Lyn:
Nov 09, 2012 09:21AM
q: What is your family's favorite aspect about your work and how it affects them individually and as a whole? ~ ty, again!! For your talk in Floyd, VA from quite a few years back. Helped our new library enormousely.
Laura Newbre:
Nov 09, 2012 09:32AM
I wanted to thank you for your books. I have been a fan since "Bean Trees". I feel you are the master at describing "place", and am always transported to the places you describe through your prose
Grace Simmons:
Nov 09, 2012 09:43AM
Q what advice do you have for young writers, or just writers in general
Marilyn Bischoff:
Nov 09, 2012 10:08AM
Has the chat begun? I get no video, other than questions from readers.
Patrick Brown:
Nov 09, 2012 10:10AM
Marilyn, it starts at 11am PT. So about 50 minutes from now.
Robin Christopher:
Nov 09, 2012 10:30AM
q I thought that the setting and characters in Poisonwood were so different from your earlier works and that this continued in subsequent works. Is this scary for you as an author? From my perspective it would take courage to try!
Sarah Lile:
Nov 09, 2012 10:36AM
I just love your work. What writers inspire you? Who do you like to read?
Tanya Mills:
Nov 09, 2012 10:40AM
q Are you willing to be interviewed (10 questions) on my author's blog? I feature a different writer every Wednesday and it would be so wonderful to feature my favorite author.
Ashley Stubbs Knight:
Nov 09, 2012 10:41AM
I want to thank you for inspiring me and my husband. We read Animal, Vegetable, Miracle together when we first started dating. Your book brought us together and helped us see that we had similar dreams and aspirations. We are now married and have a garden, and still reference your book constantly. Thank you!
Tanya Mills:
Nov 09, 2012 10:42AM
q If you are willing, how might I best contact you be email?
Monica:
Nov 09, 2012 10:44AM
Just wanted to say thank you for Animal Vegetable Miracle. It changed our lives. :0)
Patrick Brown:
Nov 09, 2012 10:49AM
Tanya, unfortunately, that's not the type of question we ask in the chat. I would suggest contacting her through her website or reaching out to her publisher.
Ruba:
Nov 09, 2012 10:50AM
The Poisonwood Bible is one of my all time favourite novels. I re-read it for inspiration with my own writing. I'm curious to know whether you intended the writing to have the rhythm that it did? And where did you get the idea of writing about a missionary family in Africa?
Pamela Stohrer:
Nov 09, 2012 10:52AM
1. What books did you love when you were a girl? 2. Did you always know that you wanted to write? 3. And maybe you could tell us how much research you had to do for Poisonwood Bible?
Alina Şuta:
Nov 09, 2012 10:55AM
q I've read your books one after another. Couldn't get enough of you. :) And I particularly loved the audiobooks of Prodigal Summer and The Poisonwood Bible because I could hear your voice in my ears, not only my mind. What prompted you to read them yourself instead of having them read by an actor? Thank you and best wishes from Romania!
Marie DeRoo:
Nov 09, 2012 10:57AM
q I loved Poisonwood Bible but the Bean Trees have stuck with me and I always tell people to read that book as it has so much meaning. Love your books!
FAndrewD12 (Abigail DeSantis):
Nov 09, 2012 10:58AM
I have not read it but what is about?
Linda Garden:
Nov 09, 2012 10:58AM
I read that you were working on a screenplay for "The Poisonwood Bible." Can you tell us where pre-production sits at the moment? I have been a huge fan since "The Bean Trees." Thank you for sharing your immense gifts with us.
Annie Oldenburg:
Nov 09, 2012 10:58AM
q What was your favorite book to write and why?
Beverley Cooper:
Nov 09, 2012 10:58AM
q. what is your writing life like? how do you schedule your day. How much is thinking and how much is actually hands on the keyboard? are you distracted easily?
FAndrewD12 (Abigail DeSantis):
Nov 09, 2012 10:59AM
Who inspired you too?
FAndrewD12 (Abigail DeSantis):
Nov 09, 2012 11:00AM
Who inspired you, and why???
Monica:
Nov 09, 2012 11:00AM
q. Just wanted to say thank you for Animal Vegetable Miracle. It changed our lives. :0)
Andi:
Nov 09, 2012 11:01AM
AMV literally changed my life. It's the first book of yours that I read--since then I've devoured them all, some more than once. This question was already asked above, but I too am curious if you've been able to adhere to the lifestyle you lived in AMV?
Phyllis Fred:
Nov 09, 2012 11:02AM
You have been my reading compaion for more thatn 20 years now! From Bean Trees, Pigs in Heaven, Animal Dreams - I feel like Turtle's Aunt Phyllis; Prodigal Summer - your most erotic and sensuous; Poisonwood Bible and The Lacuna the most profound and revealing epic novels of whats not right in our country and the power politics play in the polarization of our people; and Animal, Vegetable, Miracle the recipe for our grandchildren. I am moved by your contributions and as my daughter-in-law says "the only thing I don't like about Barbara Kingsolver's novels are that when I finish one I miss her characters. You inspire me!!! Thank you!!
Andi:
Nov 09, 2012 11:02AM
I mean AVM...lol!
FAndrewD12 (Abigail DeSantis):
Nov 09, 2012 11:03AM
What is Animal Vegetable Miracle about?
FAndrewD12 (Abigail DeSantis):
Nov 09, 2012 11:03AM
q What is Animal Vegetable Miracle about?
Agnes:
Nov 09, 2012 11:08AM
q I have both the lacuna and the poisonwood bible here to read and looking forward to them, but out of tgese two - which one do you prefer
Agnes:
Nov 09, 2012 11:08AM
q I have both the lacuna and the poisonwood bible here to read and looking forward to them, but out of tgese two - which one do you prefer
Agnes:
Nov 09, 2012 11:08AM
q I have both the lacuna and the poisonwood bible here to read and looking forward to them, but out of tgese two - which one do you prefer
Agnes:
Nov 09, 2012 11:08AM
q I have both the lacuna and the poisonwood bible here to read and looking forward to them, but out of tgese two - which one do you prefer
Kay Nelson:
Nov 09, 2012 11:10AM
Kay: q: The first chapter of Flight Behavior is so well written. It sets the stage for the whole book. Do you write that chapter first or do you go back and write after you figure out more about your charact
Kay Nelson:
Nov 09, 2012 11:10AM
q: cont: er and the plot?
Karen Budnick:
Nov 09, 2012 11:11AM
q Have you or would you consider writing a book for young readers?
Janet Givens:
Nov 09, 2012 11:15AM
Hello. What a thrill to be in contact with you, virtual or no. I"m wondering your thoughts on this new paradigm in publishing: social media, the use of FB, Twitter, webpages, BLOGs, etc. Do you see it as a push towards a more democratic/popular playing field, with the demise of the more traditional gatekeepers (agents and editors).
Mary Volmer:
Nov 09, 2012 11:17AM
A mentor once told me that writers must lead "useful" lives. I took this to mean of use to other people. How do you think writers (particularly fiction writers) might lead
Bahar Anooshahr:
Nov 09, 2012 11:17AM
Thank you for that beautiful description of fiction, Barbara. This is indeed an art. Not telling the reader what to think, not spoon-feeding them, but letting them come to the conclusion on their own.
Mary Volmer:
Nov 09, 2012 11:17AM
lives that are of use to others?
Gaëlle Bouëtté:
Nov 09, 2012 11:18AM
All the way from France I just wanted to thank you so much for your amazing work and gift. You have open my mind so much. I'm pretty definitive that you are my favorite writer and can't begin to tell you how grateful I am. All my best.!
Janet Givens:
Nov 09, 2012 11:18AM
q what were the books/authors you read as a child?
Angela Larsen:
Nov 09, 2012 11:19AM
What kind of a collaborative relationship do you have with your editor/s? How much or how little does your editor contribute to content/ideas?
Angela Larsen:
Nov 09, 2012 11:23AM
q What kind of a collaborative relationship do you have with your editor/s? How much or how little does your editor contribute to content/ideas?
Michele:
Nov 09, 2012 11:24AM
q Prodigal Summer changed the way I read books. Small Wonder introduced me to the great Doris Lessing and The Golden Notebook. I am a 2nd year college student struggling to sustain the once oppressive desire I had to change the world. You overcame a lot of self-defeating thoughts in college, that you wrote about in Small Wonder. How did you overcome the college dumps? Should I just forget about the bigger picture and only strive to better my small Northern California college community?
Ruba:
Nov 09, 2012 11:24AM
q The Poisonwood Bible is one of my all time favourite novels. I re-read it for inspiration with my own writing. I'm curious to know whether you intended the writing to have the rhythm that it did? And where did you get the idea of writing about a missionary family in Africa?
Tom Bentley:
Nov 09, 2012 11:25AM
q Are your characters real-life composites or models, and do you make extensive character background notes before committing them to paper (well, the screen)?
Lorrie Kovell:
Nov 09, 2012 11:27AM
qLorrie Kovell: Thank you for writing The Lacuna, I felt you captured the pain of being gay in a rural community and I want to thank you for giving voice to the pain and the danger of intolerance. Was there a friend or fellow artist who gave you insight into the reality of having to live a closeted life? Again thanks for giving voice to the pain of many in such a beautiful way.
Sara:
Nov 09, 2012 11:29AM
q I notice that all the questions I wanted to pose have been asked. I just wanted to thank you for reading your audiobooks. I feel that my experience with Prodigal Summer, Animal, Vegetable, Miracle and Flight Behavior was that much more intense because of that. As a crazy busy working mom I so cherish listening to such outlook changing books.
Russ Cork:
Nov 09, 2012 11:31AM
Barbara - I first read you, The Bean Trees, as it was chosen as the final exam topic for my university freshman composition class. You even came and spoke to our class to help us collectively prepare for the final. You've been a favorite author of mine ever since and I just wanted to thank you for the beautiful work you have produced over the years, especially La Lacuna!
Connie Crosby:
Nov 09, 2012 11:31AM
Thank you for this talk, and all the great books!
Joyce Platfoot:
Nov 09, 2012 11:30AM
lThank you Barbara
Annet:
Nov 09, 2012 11:31AM
Thanks. This was wonderful.
Becky DeWaters:
Nov 09, 2012 11:31AM
Yay! This was lovely.
Steph Donoghue:
Nov 09, 2012 11:31AM
Loved the interview!!
Cathy Buchanan:
Nov 09, 2012 11:32AM
Thank you. I particularly loved the commentary on fiction fostering empathy.
Judy McDonald:
Nov 09, 2012 11:32AM
Thank you for everything! Looking forward to reading Flight Behavior.
Amy Felt:
Nov 09, 2012 11:32AM
Thank you - an excellent interview! We appreciate your time, Ms. Kingsolver!
Rose Costello:
Nov 09, 2012 11:34AM
I tuned in late....Will you have this recorde for later watching as video? Would be great to have an author-chat tab on the website!
Patrick Brown:
Nov 09, 2012 11:35AM
Thank you all so much for watching. If you missed any of it, you can watch the recoding above.
Lyn:
Nov 09, 2012 11:49AM
Thank you. Wonderful!
Lyn:
Nov 09, 2012 11:49AM
Thank you. Wonderful!
Meryl Dunton-Rose:
Nov 09, 2012 12:20PM
Really enjoyed the interview, can you make sure that Barbara's reading recommendations are posted on goodreads?
Paula Schrader:
Nov 09, 2012 01:05PM
The first book I read of yours was The Prodigal Summer. Next I read The Poison Wood Bible. Both were wonderful!
Rhonda Lawrence:
Nov 09, 2012 01:47PM
I love all your writing. I think my favorite novel was Prodigal Summer, and Small World and High Tide in Tucson are wonderful to me!! But thank you for expressing all of the important insights that you do!
Sage Brush:
Nov 09, 2012 02:27PM
WONDERFUL!!!! Thank you for this interview!!!!
Claudine Grange:
Nov 10, 2012 03:45PM
I am so looking forward to reading Flight Behavior. It sounds like it captures the real problem of denial in our world. It is so important I think to understand where people are coming from so we don't give up. Barbara always makes me feel hopeful about the human condition no matter what. Glad she is in the world with me during these trying times when hope is needed.
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About Barbara Kingsolver

Barbara Kingsolver is an American novelist, essayist, and poet. She was raised in rural Kentucky and lived briefly in Africa in her early childhood. Kingsolver earned degrees in Biology at DePauw University and the University of Arizona and worked as a freelance writer before she began writing novels. Her most famous works include The Poisonwood Bible, the tale of a missionary family in the Congo, and Animal, Vegetable, Miracle, a non-fiction account of her family's attempts to eat locally.
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