Live Video Chat With Salman Rushdie

recorded Sep 19, 2012 09:00AM
(type q in front of your question to highlight that question in chat)
Patrick Brown:
Aug 28, 2012 08:15PM
Join us on Wednesday, September 19 at 12pm ET/9am PT for a live video chat with Salman Rushdie. We'll be discussing his new memoir Joseph Anton, which details the years he spent under the threat of a fatwa. This is your chance to have your questions answered by one of the true giants of contemporary literature.

If you have a question for Salman, please ask it below.
Sam B:
Sep 19, 2012 07:09AM
q Was it difficult to strip down the story of Midnights Children when adapting it into the screenplay of the new film and how many times have people tried to adapt your books to the screen in the past?
Edith Howard:
Sep 14, 2012 10:48PM
Do you think there will ever be "reform"in Islam or are we stuck with zealots forever?
Elisa Winter:
Sep 16, 2012 06:07PM
I am completely fascinated with science fiction because from the perspective of other worlds (and necessarily other cultures) we can see ourselves more clearly. Doctor Who is a recent fascination... in all of time and space The Doctor returns again and again to the worth and dignity of individuals, whatever their species/beliefs... but when he gets to fanatical killers (Daleks, Cybermen, etc.) then he is merciless in his drive to stop them from genocide. Andrew Wiggin (from the Ender's Game series) committed genocide and lived the rest of his days repenting in a truly remarkable series of novels. Mr. Rushdie, build a planet for us, with cultures that clash but do not kill because of clashes. Write that novel. Show us what it looks like when clashes are fodder for growth, when clashes are always seen as fodder for growth and renewal. I want to read the novel, not of gooey new agey "we all love each other" nonsense, not of automatons ruled by inflexible "we must not kill" morals (who don't understand why they must not), but the novel of a planet where profoundly technology immersed creatures remember when they killed for cultures' sake, but no longer do so because of the steps they took to grow out of that impulse. I want to see your name in print on this novel. Thank you. (PS: I loved Grimus and left if for a resort worker in Cozumel who told me he loved Sci-Fi. I will never forget that dance...)
Alan Lindsay:
Sep 18, 2012 05:57AM
From all your books, the image that has stayed with me most profoundly is that of Saleem deciding to prefer his own date for the death of Ghandi over the one given by history--because that's how he remembers it. Is this for you emblematic of the novel's relationship to official history--wilfully distorting the "facts" to get at the truth from another route? If so, how does the novel monitor history? Upon what hook does it hang its superior truth to make it generally and not just personally available? Taken to its extreme, how does Saleem/the novel avoid insanity?
Maddy:
Sep 18, 2012 07:22AM
q What is it like, being a published author? Does it make your approach to writing any different from if you wrote just because you felt like it? How does it feel when your first book gets published? And also, did the fatwa make you think twice before sending something you've written to the publishers?
Sasha:
Sep 18, 2012 08:44AM
q I remember reading an article of yours in India Today, which was basically your entire speech at the annual forum they hold in Mumbai. In your speech you mentioned, that great art pushes against boundaries and wishes to become and be. This to me has been a long source of inspiration, and I’ve always wondered if that applied to Satanic Verses, was it a need to question Islam and its beliefs or was it just a good story that you wanted to tell?
Sasha:
Sep 18, 2012 08:48AM
qMost of your books have had been upsetting to a lot of people, midnights children with Indira Gandhi, Shame on Zial-Ul-Haq, of course we all know about satanic verses. Do you feel, particularily after writing Satanic Verses that you yourself wish to curtail your writing, or do you still sort of lash out against the idea and write what you feel?
Karl O'Neill:
Sep 18, 2012 06:46PM
q How did you become friends with Christopher Hitchens?
Michael Middleton:
Sep 18, 2012 07:59PM
Do you see any correlation between modern Islam and 14th century Christianity and is there any way we can learn from the past to stop or at least slow Muslim extremism?
Michael Middleton:
Sep 18, 2012 08:00PM
qDo you see any correlation between modern Islam and 14th century Christianity and is there any way we can learn from the past to stop or at least slow Muslim extremism?
Georgia Roybal:
Sep 18, 2012 08:06PM
What in your childhood led you to writing? How did you keep your spirits up during the fatwa?

By the way, I took the day off from work to watch this interview. I think your interviews are very funny as well as insightful. The Moors Last Sigh is the funniest book I have ever read, but highly nuanced in language and ideas as well.
Georgia
windcuttree:
Sep 18, 2012 08:32PM
Looking back today at all the books you have written in the past, which of them do you consider to be your best work and why?
Maddy:
Sep 18, 2012 08:45PM
Q which part of the writing process do you hate the most? or do you love everything about it?
Dhanya Gopal:
Sep 18, 2012 09:07PM
In Luka and the fire of Life, your writing seemed to be driven by a lot of video-game play. Was it a deliberate attempt to insinuate a video-game feel to the book?
Kabita Sonowal:
Sep 18, 2012 09:56PM
Q Thank you for introducing books like Shalimar the Clown to us. I truly loved it. My question is: how long did you take to complete writing Joseph Anton? What challenges did you face while writing the book? Thanks.
SilverRaindrops:
Sep 19, 2012 12:09AM
q What do you think about your books being classified as "Magical Realism"? Do you agree with it, or does it bother you that people feel the need to sort books that way?
إسراء هاشم:
Sep 19, 2012 12:44AM
q Did you believe in your 'satanic verses', ever?
Amit Shetty:
Sep 19, 2012 12:54AM
Regarding the Satanic Verses, was one man's freedom of expression worth the price of the mayhem and death it caused throughout the world?
(deleted user):
Sep 19, 2012 02:26AM
do you fear the death ?
Sam B:
Sep 19, 2012 07:10AM
q I have a question relating to the memoir. How do you approach writing about a real person who is still alive, how do you make them live as a 'character' within the book when the real person may object to the ways in which you have written about them? Is this a conflict for you?

Thanks,
Sam.
Maddy:
Sep 19, 2012 03:27AM
Are you unhappy with the fact that the satanic verses gets more publicity than your other books simply because it angered someone? When you wrote the book did you anticipate that it would trigger something so huge and different from your other books? When did you come up with the concept, and how did you see it as it was being written?
Maddy:
Sep 19, 2012 03:28AM
q Are you unhappy with the fact that the satanic verses gets more publicity than your other books simply because it angered someone? When you wrote the book did you anticipate that it would trigger something so huge and different from your other books? When did you come up with the concept, and how did you see it as it was being written?
Maddy:
Sep 19, 2012 03:39AM
q Are you unhappy with the fact that the satanic verses gets more publicity than your other books simply because it angered someone? When you wrote the book did you anticipate that it would trigger something so huge and different from your other books? When did you come up with the concept, and how did you see it as it was being written?
Maddy:
Sep 19, 2012 03:40AM
sorry!!
Shane Finan:
Sep 19, 2012 05:08AM
Do you think you have written your masterpiece yet, or is it still to come?
Hesham Elkhatib:
Sep 19, 2012 05:14AM
I like to know your point of view about people when they do show reasonable respect to religious matters as a writer / as a person ?
Bayandur Pogosyan:
Sep 19, 2012 05:16AM
q I understand that the topic of Islam is going to be highlighted in today's conversation, but I'd like to ask another question, more concerning your literature. I'm a writer too, and recently decided to go English. I've been a long-time fan of your "Satanic Verses", and one thing I loved about it was the "immigrant" air of the narrative, the book didn't pretend to be written by an English writer; it felt like the book itself was an immigrant. So in my latest short story, "The Nightingale", I avoided imitating the usual styles used by English-language and tried to be as honest with the style as I could. So, though fame and commercial success aren't the aim, but are a good result, what could you possibly advice a fellow "immigrant writer" to be successful on the English-language scene and to get published?
Maddy:
Sep 19, 2012 05:33AM
i like your question, Mr. Pogosyan..
Avital Gad-Cykman:
Sep 19, 2012 06:24AM
How has your writing style developed and changed over the years? Are you writing differently these days?
Agnes Zilinszki:
Sep 19, 2012 06:29AM
Why or how you chose the genre of magic realism? Or can we talk about "choice"? Would you recommend some authors who are not well-known (yet) but worth paying attention to them? Thank you for answering my questions in advance, Sir. :)
Agnes Zilinszki:
Sep 19, 2012 06:32AM
q Why or how you chose the genre of magic realism? Or can we talk about "choice"? Would you recommend some authors who are not well-known (yet) but worth paying attention to them? Thank you for answering my questions in advance, Sir. :)
Carolina Echevarría:
Sep 19, 2012 07:17AM
q Storytelling is one of the most important elements in your books, why? Another element is the contrast between East and West. What is the relationship between both?
Ben Hundley:
Sep 19, 2012 07:50AM
q: Please describe your Beckettian moods (i.e. Didi + Gogo in Waiting for Godot, NYT Book Review).
Maelynn Seymour-Major:
Sep 19, 2012 08:11AM
q Do you plan on writing any more children's books?
Atmika:
Sep 19, 2012 08:11AM
qDid you even want to give up writing because of all the protests and fatwas?
Ilana DW:
Sep 19, 2012 08:26AM
qDo you see any chance for open societies in this part of the world?
Shane Finan:
Sep 19, 2012 08:29AM
q (rephrasng) Obviously Satanic Verses has been your most commercially successful novel, probably helped by the controvercial publicity that it received. But you have received critical acclaim for several novels, such as Shalamar the Clown. Do you believe that you have written your masterpiece yet, and if so, which story?
Aswini Sivaraman:
Sep 19, 2012 08:32AM
q Sir, I have read and watched as many interviews as I can about your new book. I am amused to see how everybody's usual first question is about why you wrote this book now or something else that could be termed predictable. Is there something else about this book that you'd like to tell us? Is there a challenging question about the book along with an answer you'd like us to know? (Talk about interviewing becoming lazy!)
Ravisankar Vinnakota:
Sep 19, 2012 08:45AM
Do you ever plan to write a memoir about your childhood and growing up in India?
Charles Saini:
Sep 19, 2012 08:52AM
qNow that you've adapted the script for the Midnight's Children film, have you thought about others? (Satanic Verses, Enchantress of Florence, etc). How do you negotiate the complexities of language, narrative, and metatextual histories into film adaptations?
Pujashree Das:
Sep 19, 2012 08:53AM
q Any predictions on the influence of the "immigrant identity" on the future of literature and story-telling?
Charles Saini:
Sep 19, 2012 08:53AM
qDid the playscript you wrote of Midnight's Children years ago help with the current project?
Michael Meder:
Sep 19, 2012 08:54AM
This is a true Honor, to enjoy your company, Sir. Thank you for this opportunity.
Pam Bustin:
Sep 19, 2012 08:58AM
Hear hear, Michael - I too am honoured to be here.
Bharath Manjesh:
Sep 19, 2012 08:59AM
How have the women in your life affected your writing?
Riku Sayuj:
Sep 19, 2012 08:59AM
q After my reading of Satanic Verses, I pondered a lot on the parallels with Othello. How closely were you influenced by Othello? How much has Shakespeare influenced your writings? I postulated in my review that Satanic Verses was written originally as a literary exercise of providing motive to Othello and the religiosity was only a byproduct -would you agree to this? If so, isn't it sweetly ironic that it unleashed such evil in its aftermath? (for my review - http://www.goodreads.com/review/show/...)
Riku Sayuj:
Sep 19, 2012 09:00AM
q After my reading of Satanic Verses, I pondered a lot on the parallels with Othello. How closely were you influenced by Othello? How much has Shakespeare influenced your writings? I postulated in my review that Satanic Verses was written originally as a literary exercise of providing motive to Othello and the religiosity was only a byproduct -would you agree to this? If so, isn't it sweetly ironic that it unleashed such evil in its aftermath? (for my review - http://www.goodreads.com/review/show/...)
Riku Sayuj:
Sep 19, 2012 09:02AM
q what was the impetus that turned you towards your chosen genre of writing? Who is your 'literary mentor' whose works inspired you to move in this direction? or was it because India was just so inherently mystical in the telling that you could not avoid the genre?
Syed Zeeshan Yunus:
Sep 19, 2012 09:02AM
qYou sir are of the finest minds produced by the sub-continent. It is unfortunate how things took a turn after 'Satanic Verses' the subcontinent lost a gem. What is your stand on organised religion? do you think religion today is the biggest discriminator?
Becca:
Sep 19, 2012 09:03AM
q Do you believe you would be as well know as you are without the controversy surrounding your writing and do you agree that the attacks on you actually aided your career in the long term?
Riku Sayuj:
Sep 19, 2012 09:05AM
q do you feel that the drama related to fatwa has since then overshadowed your literary greatness? I feel that the talk has become more political than literary since then and that is very sad.
Ananthu:
Sep 19, 2012 09:06AM
qSir Rushdie, I am a teenager and you're my idol. I loved both Midnight's Children and The Satanic Verses. My questions are: At what age did you start reading? What events in your early life led you to writing? Can you share some memories associated with some of your favorite books?
Sasan Rezai:
Sep 19, 2012 09:06AM
تو یک احمقی که از بی منطقی رو به توهین آوردی
Sasan Rezai:
Sep 19, 2012 09:06AM
لعنت به تو
Sasan Rezai:
Sep 19, 2012 09:06AM
انت ولدالزنا
Gabriel Astilla:
Sep 19, 2012 09:08AM
q how did you managed to live underground and knowing that people are reacting violently to your Novel The Satanic Verses? and also thank you for making the novel I very much love it
Joni Baboci:
Sep 19, 2012 09:08AM
q Mr. Rushdie is there any way to defuse the growing east-west religious tension?
Sasan Rezai:
Sep 19, 2012 09:11AM
are you bitch?
Riku Sayuj:
Sep 19, 2012 09:11AM
q is there another anthology of short stories planned like the one you had edited and compiled to mark india's 50th anniversary? It is the best anthology of short stories I have read yet...
Becca:
Sep 19, 2012 09:12AM
Q the head immam in Syria has condemned the attacks on the controversial video; do you believe that this is a step in the right direction or a blip that will have little or no effect?
Riku Sayuj:
Sep 19, 2012 09:12AM
q the fact that this interview is turning out to be more a political discussion than a literary discussion... that illustrates the point of my earlier question. how do we save 'Salman Rushdie' as a literary figure departed from the political figure?
Janna Hill:
Sep 19, 2012 09:14AM
q what do you enjoy reading in your spare time?
Hend:
Sep 19, 2012 09:16AM
what do u think of this quote(east is east, and west is west, and never the twain shall meet) by by Rudyard Kipling
Riku Sayuj:
Sep 19, 2012 09:17AM
q which are the myths you have drawn on most heavily in your work? How much inter-cultural mixing was part of what gives the 'fun' element to your work?
Riku Sayuj:
Sep 19, 2012 09:19AM
Why is there an obsession with physical ugliness that runs through much of your work? Much of Midnight's Children and Satanic Verses repeatedly adresses tis but provides no resolution or solution to addressing this...
Dyuti Coomar:
Sep 19, 2012 09:19AM
q What is the most important lack in your life? Do you regret any decision that you've made in your literary life?
Gabi Flores:
Sep 19, 2012 09:19AM
q I love Haroun and the Sea of Stories, what were your thoughts on writing this book?
Courtney Milleson:
Sep 19, 2012 09:20AM
q What are you reading now and what's on your 'must read' list?
Aswini Sivaraman:
Sep 19, 2012 09:20AM
q Did you anticipate the reaction to Satanic Verses? (Before and after its release) Was it something that just threw you off? Talk about rude shocks!
Liza Novikova:
Sep 19, 2012 09:21AM
Liza: q 1. Your pseudonym is made from Chekhov's name. What is your favourite Anton Chekhov's short story? 2. You mention Brodsky in "Joseph Anton". Probably there are some other Russian writers you remembered as an examples of persecuted authors?
Sgossard:
Sep 19, 2012 09:22AM
I just want to say we should feel honored and in the presence of greatness. Love your books Mr. Rushdie. Some of my fondest literary memories belong to your books. Thank you.
Riku Sayuj:
Sep 19, 2012 09:22AM
q why did you choose to fictionalize this memoir? What purpose does that serve? Does it help your own writing process by giving freedom?
Lorena Lo Brutto:
Sep 19, 2012 09:22AM
Cicero said: “Times are bad. Children no longer obey their parents, and everyone is writing a book.” Since I believe this to be true, what do you think can help a writer to stand out from the mass of "wanna-be-a-writer-because-it's-trendy"?
Lorena Lo Brutto:
Sep 19, 2012 09:23AM
q Cicero said: “Times are bad. Children no longer obey their parents, and everyone is writing a book.” Since I believe this to be true, what do you think can help a writer to stand out from the mass of "wanna-be-a-writer-because-it's-trendy"?
Riku Sayuj:
Sep 19, 2012 09:24AM
Thanks Sir! I hope you do compile another anthology - from pakistan maybe...
Dr.Mohamed Nasrullah:
Sep 19, 2012 09:24AM
Sir Salman Roushdy, let me ask you the direct shocking question that emits in brains of muslim youth, does History of islam need to be revised and purified ??
Carolina Echevarría:
Sep 19, 2012 09:25AM
What are your five favorite books ever and why? Of your books, what has been your favorite so far?
Sharon Thekkekara:
Sep 19, 2012 09:26AM
What do you think is required for India's literary culture to become powerful; something like how the culture of the emigre writers of Russia developed?
Charles Saini:
Sep 19, 2012 09:26AM
would you ever work towards adapting the satanic verses?
Pujashree Das:
Sep 19, 2012 09:27AM
q Any other of your novels you;d like to see made into a movie? I'd love a miniseries on the Enchantress of Florence
Becca:
Sep 19, 2012 09:27AM
q Do you have any plans for after the promotion of Joseph Anton is finished and your term at Emory University is over?
Charles Saini:
Sep 19, 2012 09:28AM
qdo you think that the linearity of midnight's children compromises some of your original artistic intentions
Massimo Marino:
Sep 19, 2012 09:28AM
qas on non native-english writer, what were the greatest obstacles when you started writing and how did you overcome them?
Ananthu:
Sep 19, 2012 09:28AM
qSir Rushdie, I am a teenager and you're my idol. I loved both Midnight's Children and The Satanic Verses. My questions are: At what age did you start reading? What events in your early life led you to writing? Can you share some memories associated with some of your favorite books?
Clare Coffey:
Sep 19, 2012 09:28AM
q Should you allow the Satanic Verses to be adapted in light of what is currently happening across the globe
Hend:
Sep 19, 2012 09:29AM
q 11 minutes ago what do u think of this quote(east is east, and west is west, and never the twain shall meet) by by Rudyard Kipling
Dr.Mohamed Nasrullah:
Sep 19, 2012 09:29AM
Sir Salman Roushdy, let me ask you the direct shocking question that emits in brains of muslim youth, does History of islam need to be revised and purified , does what we believe in needs to get reviewed ?
Philip:
Sep 19, 2012 09:29AM
Mr. Rushdie, I have loved many of your books. I love Haroun and the Sea of Stories and Luka and the Fire of Life. Can you talk about the process of writing stories that are more geared towards children compared to most of your other writing, and how was the process of writing the two so far apart from each other? And how much did you have your own children in mind as you wrote them?
Becca:
Sep 19, 2012 09:30AM
anathu you got your answewr, now please stop spamming the chat and re posting the same q
Becca:
Sep 19, 2012 09:30AM
*answer
Aswini Sivaraman:
Sep 19, 2012 09:30AM
q If you had to do it all over again, how would you do it?
Dr.Mohamed Nasrullah:
Sep 19, 2012 09:32AM
Sir Salman Roushdy, let me ask you the direct shocking question that emits in brains of muslim youth, does History of islam need to be revised and purified , does what we believe in needs to get reviewed ?
Dr.Mohamed Nasrullah:
Sep 19, 2012 09:32AM
q 1 minute ago Sir Salman Roushdy, let me ask you the direct shocking question that emits in brains of muslim youth, does History of islam need to be revised and purified , does what we believe in needs to get reviewed ?
Pujashree Das:
Sep 19, 2012 09:32AM
q Any predictions on the influence of the "immigrant identity" on the future of storytelling and literature?
Dr.Mohamed Nasrullah:
Sep 19, 2012 09:32AM
q Sir Salman Roushdy, let me ask you the direct shocking question that emits in brains of muslim youth, does History of islam need to be revised and purified , does what we believe in needs to get reviewed ?
Riku Sayuj:
Sep 19, 2012 09:33AM
q what was the process in finding your way during that period? Reading a lot or continuous writing?
Riku Sayuj:
Sep 19, 2012 09:34AM
I wish the question on shakespeare could have been adressed... :(
Becca:
Sep 19, 2012 09:34AM
q Do you have any plans for after the promotion of Joseph Anton is finished and your term at Emory University is over?
Ananthu:
Sep 19, 2012 09:34AM
RIku Sayuj: Same here. I loved your review. Brilliant!
Becca:
Sep 19, 2012 09:35AM
Riku Sayuj: Me too!
Maaz Abdelrahman:
Sep 19, 2012 09:35AM
qwhat kind of change could be possible in the middle east to respect the freedom of expression?
Riku Sayuj:
Sep 19, 2012 09:36AM
Thanks Ananthu and Becky! Maybe one day :)
MountainShelby:
Sep 19, 2012 09:37AM
Thanks, this was great.
Becca:
Sep 19, 2012 09:37AM
Don't worry Riku i seems difficult q's are being deliberately avoided, take it as a compliment :)
Dr.Mohamed Nasrullah:
Sep 19, 2012 09:37AM
Q Sir Salman Roushdy, let me ask you the direct shocking question that emits in brains of muslim youth, does History of islam need to be revised and purified , does what we believe in needs to get reviewed ?
Aswini Sivaraman:
Sep 19, 2012 09:38AM
Thank you, goodreads and Sir Rushdie!
Kyle Tingley:
Sep 19, 2012 09:38AM
This was great. Thanks!
Riku Sayuj:
Sep 19, 2012 09:38AM
:) it was a privilege just watching it! Thanks goodreads!
Andrew:
Sep 19, 2012 09:38AM
What was the book reccomendation?
Mike Duron:
Sep 19, 2012 09:38AM
Great job! Thanks for having this! :)
Agnes Zilinszki:
Sep 19, 2012 09:38AM
Thank you! :)
Mike Duron:
Sep 19, 2012 09:39AM
Right -- I caught the last name Mitchell, but that was it. What was that book suggestion again?
Dyuti Coomar:
Sep 19, 2012 09:39AM
Thanks. Enjoyed it.
Riku Sayuj:
Sep 19, 2012 09:39AM
becky, maybe goodreads can just mail Sir rushdie the chat transcript so that he can see what ppl want to know? Might be a good idea
Becca:
Sep 19, 2012 09:39AM
Thanks for the opportunity to see this, maybe more time for questions next time?
Riku Sayuj:
Sep 19, 2012 09:39AM
Cloud Atlas
Riku Sayuj:
Sep 19, 2012 09:39AM
Mike... it was Cloud Atlas
Andrew:
Sep 19, 2012 09:40AM
Thanks Riku!
Maaz Abdelrahman:
Sep 19, 2012 09:40AM
q What was the recomended books?
Becca:
Sep 19, 2012 09:40AM
Riku: or he could just log on and look at it himself and aswer in the chat? (we wish!)
Mike Duron:
Sep 19, 2012 09:40AM
Thank you, Riku! :)
Joni Baboci:
Sep 19, 2012 09:40AM
Cloud Atlas - David Mitchell
Becca:
Sep 19, 2012 09:42AM
was i the only one getting an echo from SirR and the host sounding really loud?
Maddy:
Sep 19, 2012 09:42AM
does anyone know when you get to watch it again?
Maaz Abdelrahman:
Sep 19, 2012 09:42AM
me too
Ananthu:
Sep 19, 2012 09:42AM
Goodreads, I can't thank you enough! This was awesome!
Maddy:
Sep 19, 2012 09:43AM
yeah becky, the quality was really cracky
Ananthu:
Sep 19, 2012 09:43AM
Maddy:Here - http://www.livestream.com/goodreads/v...
Maaz Abdelrahman:
Sep 19, 2012 09:43AM
I didn't hear most of the answers..
Becca:
Sep 19, 2012 09:43AM
ta, maddy just press the play button and it restarts
Maddy:
Sep 19, 2012 09:43AM
thanks!!
Kevin Brown:
Sep 19, 2012 09:44AM
Thanks goodreads this was great!
Maddy:
Sep 19, 2012 09:44AM
I couldnt even hear the answer to my question.. :(
Georgia Roybal:
Sep 19, 2012 09:44AM
Great! I took the day off from work to see this and it was worth it.
Maaz Abdelrahman:
Sep 19, 2012 09:44AM
thank you all
Liza Novikova:
Sep 19, 2012 09:46AM
thank you!
Patrick Brown:
Sep 19, 2012 09:49AM
Thank you all so much for watching. I apologize for not getting to more of your great questions. The recording is now posted if you'd like to watch it.
Becca:
Sep 19, 2012 09:49AM
maddy:he said there wasnt much he could do about SV's publicity and he was neutral on the subject and people wrote telling him they found it funny and couldn't see the problem with it. Then he had a pop at "constructed rage". you can find the answer at 03:00 ish on the video
Gabriel Astilla:
Sep 19, 2012 09:51AM
thank you goodreads for having this. My question was lucky enough to be answered. thank you so much. thanks Riku and thank you so much Goodreads!
Riku Sayuj:
Sep 19, 2012 09:53AM
We were all privileged today. Patrick, you conducted the interview so well, you managed to keep him entertained throughout! He almost didnt want to go? :)
Joni Baboci:
Sep 19, 2012 09:53AM
Patrick this was awesome. I hope you can keep having this kind of quality unique live-chats. To next time.
Riku Sayuj:
Sep 19, 2012 09:53AM
loved the crack on your name gabriel :)
Lexana Angel:
Sep 19, 2012 09:57AM
any future obsession of what you want to write down after this novel?
Ananthu:
Sep 19, 2012 09:57AM
The audio quality was a tad underwhelming. That's my only complaint.
Tina Kloter Glidden:
Sep 19, 2012 10:03AM
Thank you for hosting this wonderful interview with one of my favorite authors. It was extremely well done.
Gabriel Astilla:
Sep 19, 2012 10:04AM
Patrick: that was really great! even though the audio quality did not do a good job but who cares, for me since the video was uploaded we can watch it anytime we want just to know the answers so it's great to have a rare time like this.
Riku: yeah I know, and I like the way that I was somewhat similar to what Gibreel Farishta acted in the story, but thanks again
Sam B:
Sep 19, 2012 10:05AM
Nice to have a question answered, thanks for putting this on.
Maddy:
Sep 19, 2012 10:05AM
Thanks goodreads! lol.. that was an awesome interview you gave us!
Maddy:
Sep 19, 2012 10:07AM
And thanks a ton becky too!
Riku Sayuj:
Sep 19, 2012 10:07AM
Just ordered the book! cheers all!
Maddy:
Sep 19, 2012 10:09AM
I'll be waiting for your review riku ;)
Riku Sayuj:
Sep 19, 2012 10:11AM
you bet maddy :)
Jolie Rolie Polie :D:
Sep 19, 2012 11:12AM
Q are you still there?
Sydney Young:
Sep 19, 2012 11:48AM
This was great, thanks so much!
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About Salman Rushdie

Sir Ahmed Salman Rushdie is a novelist and essayist. Much of his early fiction is set at least partly on the Indian subcontinent. His style is often classified as magical realism, while a dominant theme of his work is the story of the many connections, disruptions and migrations between the Eastern and Western world.

His fourth novel, The Satanic Verses, led to protests from Muslims in several countries, some of which were violent. Faced with death threats and a fatwa (religious edict) issued by Ayatollah Ruhollah Khomeini, then Supreme Leader of Iran, which called for him to be killed, he spent nearly a decade largely underground, appearing in public only sporadically. In June 2007, he was appointed a Knight Bachelor for "services to literature", which "thrilled and humbled" him. In 2007, he began a five-year term as Distinguished Writer in Residence at Emory University.
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