The Mystery, Crime, and Thriller Group discussion

104 views
Book Hunting / Recommendations > Contemporary modern day Hard Boiled author you recommend

Comments (showing 1-30 of 30) (30 new)    post a comment »
dateDown arrow    newest »

message 1: by Tom (new)

Tom Vater (goodreadscomtom_vater) | 17 comments Hi Ken,
Try my new novel, The Cambodian Book of the Dead, published by Crime Wave Press.

About the Book: German Detective Maier travels to Cambodia, a country re-emerging from a half century of war, genocide, famine and cultural collapse, to find the heir to a Hamburg coffee empire.
As soon as the private eye and former war reporter arrives in Cambodia, his search for the young coffee magnate leads into the darkest corners of the country’s history and back in time, through the communist revolution to the White Spider, a Nazi war criminal who hides amongst the detritus of another nation’s collapse and reigns over an ancient Khmer temple deep in the jungles of Cambodia.
Maier, captured and imprisoned, is forced into the worst job of his life – he is to write the biography of the White Spider, a tale of mass murder that reaches from the Cambodian Killing Fields back to Europe’s concentration camps – or die.

You can purchase The Cambodian Book of the Dead from amazon or amazon UK as a Kindle e Book. Print edition will be out in October.

http://www.amazon.com/The-Cambodian-B...

or

http://www.amazon.co.uk/The-Cambodian...


message 2: by M.B. (new)

M.B. Brophy (mbbrophy) | 10 comments Hi Ken,

Who have you read already? I don't know of any "new" ones, but I stumble across authors who are new to me from time to time. I think Ian Rankin's John Rebus was my latest one. He's been around a while, but since I typically think of hard-boiled mysteries as American creations, it took me a while to pick up Rankin.


message 3: by Janebbooks (last edited Jul 13, 2012 11:53PM) (new)

Janebbooks | 25 comments There's a couple of hard-boiled Irish crme writers you may enjoy. Ken Bruen writes Hiburnian noir in his Jack Taylor series....and finds tinkers and Mary Magdalenes in modern Galway, Ireland. Start at the beginning with The Guards.

More soft-boiled and much like Ross McDonald is one Declan Hughes of Dublin. I've enjoyed all his Ed Loy P. I. series especially The Price of Blood: An Irish Novel of Suspense which is better Uk titled as THE DYING BREED. I've done reviews of all his Ed Loy's except THE CITY OF LOST GIRLS. My favorite is All the Dead Voices for its history and brief encounter with the violence of later day IRA Troubles.

Jane


message 4: by Brian (last edited Jul 14, 2012 11:41AM) (new)

Brian Thornton | 12 comments Jeeze, how long have you got, Ken? Just off the top of my head, first the Americans, then Brits, and one Frenchman who particularly impressed me lately:

Don Winslow (especially POWER OF THE DOG, THE DEATH AND LIFE OF FRANKIE MACHINE, THE DAWN PATROL, and of course, SAVAGES)

Sean Doolittle (especially DIRT and BURN)

Ace Atkins (especially THE RANGER)

Sean Chercover (BIG CITY, BAD BLOOD and TRIGGER CITY)

David Corbett (especially DO THEY KNOW I'M RUNNING?)

And the Brits:

Al Guthrie (especially KISS HER GOODBYE and HARD MAN)

Iain Rankin (ANYTHING!)

Bill James (ANYTHING!)

Ray Banks (ANYTHING!)

And the French guy:

Jean-Claude Izzo (Only one I've read is TOTAL CHAOS. Loved it!)

Hope these help, and happy reading!

Brian


message 5: by Contrarius (new)

Contrarius | 7 comments Charlie Huston. Nuff said.


message 6: by Brian (new)

Brian Thornton | 12 comments Oh, and of course, KEN BRUEN! How could I have forgotten him???


message 7: by Dorie (last edited Jul 14, 2012 08:12PM) (new)

Dorie (DorieAnn) | 464 comments I second Charlie Huston!


message 8: by M.B. (last edited Jul 14, 2012 08:43PM) (new)

M.B. Brophy (mbbrophy) | 10 comments Ken,

You'll either love them or hate them, but Robert B. Parker's Spenser novels might fit the bill. Some of them can be a bit dated, but Spenser and Hawk are definitely anti-heros. Personally, I enjoy them. Some of the '70s psychobabble have aged into some really funny scenes about the self-help movement.

I've only read a few Lawrence Block novels, but I've enjoyed his Matthew Scudder as well.


message 9: by Brian (new)

Brian January (brianjanuary) | 40 comments Richard Stark (Donald Westlake)'s Parker series.


message 10: by Eve (new)

Eve Collier | 16 comments Thanks for this thread, Ken.

Crime writers I enjoy and my favourite books of theirs are

Ruth Rendell : A Sleeping Life
Minette Walters : The Scold's Bridle
Joanna Stephen-Ward : The Doll Collection
Patricia Cornwell : Cruel and Unusual
Val McDermid : A Place Of Execution
PD James : An Unsuitable Job For A Woman
Robert Goddard : Beyond Recall

That's enough for now.


message 11: by Scout (new)

Scout (goodreadscomscout) | 1093 comments I don't know if you'd describe Walter Mosley's novels as hard-boiled, but they're not tame. Maybe try the Travis McGee series by John D. MacDonald.


message 12: by Vince (new)

Vince Panone (VincePan1) | 23 comments Loren D Estleman, and the Amos Walker series. Detroit based P.I. and a throwback to the Chandler, Hammett traditions.
Though he is a cop, Michael Connelly's Harry Bosch is very much outside the rules in most of his novels. I think Connelly is the finest mystery writer of the last couple of decades, and the Bosch books are outstanding. Read them in order, if possible.


message 13: by Janebbooks (last edited Aug 02, 2012 02:08AM) (new)

Janebbooks | 25 comments NYKen wrote: "Hi M.B.,
I suppose I'm looking for an anti-hero character that is not in law enforcement as a protagonist.

The protagonist of Irish crime writer John Connolly's series is not in law enforcement...CHARLIE PARKER P. I.... I particularly like The Killing Kind when Charlie investigates the death of a student writing her dissertation on the disappearance of the Aroostook Baptists in the northern woods of Maine....and THE WHITE ROAD when Connolly quotes T. S. Eliot and sends Charlie to South Carolina.
Not your usual private eye....always entertaining

Jane



message 14: by Tay (new)

Tay | 249 comments Vince wrote: "Loren D Estleman, and the Amos Walker series. Detroit based P.I. and a throwback to the Chandler, Hammett traditions.
Though he is a cop, Michael Connelly's Harry Bosch is very much outside the rul..."


I second Michael Connelly. Outstanding writer.


message 15: by Brian (new)

Brian January (brianjanuary) | 40 comments Loren D. Estleman is an excellent writer--a must read!


message 16: by Cathy (new)

Cathy DuPont (CathyDuPont) | 132 comments Scout wrote: "I don't know if you'd describe Walter Mosley's novels as hard-boiled, but they're not tame. Maybe try the Travis McGee series by John D. MacDonald."

Scout: You scored BIG in my book with those names. Love them both and believe Moseley is considered hard-boiled because that was one of the reasons I read him. Great writers both.


message 17: by Scout (new)

Scout (goodreadscomscout) | 1093 comments Glad to know there's a kindred spirit out there, Cathy.


message 18: by Cathy (last edited Aug 09, 2012 06:22PM) (new)

Cathy DuPont (CathyDuPont) | 132 comments Scout wrote: "Glad to know there's a kindred spirit out there, Cathy."

Scout, yes, a big time kindred spirit. Finishing up on the last Mickey Spillane book (I think) and looking forward to another Raymond Chandler. Hope NYKen, who asked the question, takes your great suggestions.

Think Moseley is terrific, wish he could have written more before he passed away. Great talent.


message 19: by Jan C (new)

Jan C (woeisme) | 20402 comments Cathy wrote: "Scout wrote: "Glad to know there's a kindred spirit out there, Cathy."

Scout, yes, a big time kindred spirit. Finishing up on the last Mickey Spillane book (I think) and looking forward to anothe..."


Mosley dead? Not per anything I saw on Google (or is it Bing?). He had a Leonid McGill book out this year. But I don't read that series - I don't read any series when the lead character has my last name. It freaks me out too much.


message 20: by Cathy (last edited Aug 10, 2012 05:05AM) (new)

Cathy DuPont (CathyDuPont) | 132 comments Jan C wrote: "Cathy wrote: "Scout wrote: "Glad to know there's a kindred spirit out there, Cathy."

Scout, yes, a big time kindred spirit. Finishing up on the last Mickey Spillane book (I think) and looking for..."


Jan: My apology to you and to Scout. I've read one Walter Mosely but I was thinking of Charles Williford, creator or the Holk Mosely series, (considered noir) when I said he had passed.

Jan, no Mosely's not gone and again my apology to your and Scout for confusing the issue. Thanks for the correction.


message 21: by Scout (new)

Scout (goodreadscomscout) | 1093 comments My jaw did drop, Cathy:) Good to know Mosley's still kicking. You might want to try another of his novels, and I'll try another of Willeford's.


message 22: by Cathy (new)

Cathy DuPont (CathyDuPont) | 132 comments Scout: This week me and friend happened by used book store going out of business and I found two Mosley's along with 55 other books. Broke the bank at $9.50! Looking forward to reading the two Mosley's and the rest of them. What a bargain, mostly mysteries.


message 23: by Scout (new)

Scout (goodreadscomscout) | 1093 comments What a bargain! Enjoy.


message 24: by Ben (new)

Ben Guilfoy | 8 comments Contrarius wrote: "Charlie Huston. Nuff said."

For serious. I've only read 'No Dominion', but it was excellent.


message 25: by Cathy (new)

Cathy DuPont (CathyDuPont) | 132 comments Scout wrote: "My jaw did drop, Cathy:) Good to know Mosley's still kicking. You might want to try another of his novels, and I'll try another of Willeford's."

Scout: Started Mosely and like him a lot. Did not realize he's black. Great read and read somewhere that he was President Clinton's favorite writer.


message 26: by Scout (new)

Scout (goodreadscomscout) | 1093 comments I didn't know that, but I can see why.


message 27: by D.R. (new)

D.R. (drmar120) | 27 comments Many fine ideas here that I can't disagree with. But among the continuing series that I'm familiar with, I think the best, purest hard-boiled tales come from the Aussie writer Peter Corris. His Cliff Hardy series I believe is now at 39 novels and a few short story collections. Give one a try.


message 28: by Cathy (last edited Aug 29, 2012 01:39PM) (new)

Cathy DuPont (CathyDuPont) | 132 comments D. R., what is your definition of hard-boiled?

With that said, I'm trying to put an Aussie writer with any definition of hard-boiled because hard-boiled seems so very, very American. Help me out here, please. To me it's like talking about cowboys, chaps and all, in France or something.


message 29: by D.R. (new)

D.R. (drmar120) | 27 comments Cathy wrote: "D. R., what is your definition of hard-boiled?

With that said, I'm trying to put an Aussie writer with any definition of hard-boiled because hard-boiled seems so very, very American. Help me out ..."


Read a Peter Corris book and tell me what you think, Cathy. I think you'll be surprised.

Corris has all the perks of hard-boiled. And with greater fidelity to the classics than most American practitioners. The cynical, down-at-heels gumshoe. The femme fatales. The crusty cops. The corrupt wealthy. Sex. Murder. Frame-ups. Violence. Only it's set in Melbourne.


message 30: by Cathy (new)

Cathy DuPont (CathyDuPont) | 132 comments Thanks, I'll take a look. Sounds interesting anyway. And thanks for your definition. It coincides with mine.

Cathy


back to top

19126

The Mystery, Crime, and Thriller Group

unread topics | mark unread


Books mentioned in this topic

The Guards (other topics)
The Price of Blood (other topics)
All the Dead Voices (other topics)
A Sleeping Life (other topics)
The Scold's Bridle (other topics)
More...

Authors mentioned in this topic

Charlie Huston (other topics)