The Lion, the Witch, and the Wardrobe (Chronicles of Narnia, #1) The Lion, the Witch, and the Wardrobe discussion


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How did the White Witch give Edmund Turkish Delight if there is no Turkey in Narnia?

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Gabriel Did I just start a paradox?


ϮAʛʛⅇℛʊℵʛ {Supernatural Freak} Well, I think her magic works on desire. Because Edmund knew specifically what he wanted, I think it allowed her magic to be able to produce it. Plus, he couldn't stop desiring the enchanted Turkish Delight, so I think her magic represents desire. Just pondering this off the top of my head, I could be spouting nonsense.


Elisabeth Wheatley The witch had been to our world, if only briefly. But I think Taggerung is right that her magic worked on desires. :)

I wonder if Lewis even thought about that when he wrote it...?


message 4: by [deleted user] (new)

There's no turkey in Turkish Delight

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Turkish_...


message 5: by Dani (last edited Jul 08, 2012 09:44AM) (new) - rated it 4 stars

Dani @macgregor - the place of origin is Turkey (country).
I'm sure there are turkeys (bird) in Narnia :)


message 6: by Mia (new) - rated it 4 stars

Mia edmund wished for a treat. the witch simply conjured up and gave a physical form to his inner desires


Alana Lewis included a lot of things in Narnia that wouldn't be possible if they truly were separate places. Christmas, for example, is not possible without Jesus having had his birth there, but the understanding of Christmas exists in Narnia anyway. Lewis doesn't try to explain it away, he just assumes it as another part of the fantasy.


Will IV Well, the first king and queen were actually drawn into Narnia from Britain, so Christmas could have been introduced by them.


Steph Magic......... :)


message 10: by Jo (new) - rated it 3 stars

Jo Very clever.


Benjamin Wirtz Interesting you bring in Christmas, maybe Father Christmas has the ability to travels between the worlds.


Susan Because Turkish Delight is a soft candy.


Pedja Why would there be turkeys in Narnia?


message 14: by Paul (new) - rated it 3 stars

Paul Vincent She probably achieved it by the same amazing magic that I used to eat Turkish Delight in Wales, there's no Turkey in Wales either, but we still manage to have Turkish Delight in the shops.

I think post 6 effectively answers this one!

(And I can't believe that some people thought Turkish Delight had meat in it!!)


Ulmer Ian Anyone who doesn't know what Turkish delight is should go get some immediately. It really is delicious.


message 16: by Ally (new) - rated it 5 stars

Ally Ian wrote: "Anyone who doesn't know what Turkish delight is should go get some immediately. It really is delicious."

Haha really made me laugh!It is SO delicious. I think the witch simply conjured Edmunds desires, to play on his greed and take advantage of his jealous greedy nature. It serves (as many of the story lines in this book) to teach a lesson in morals. I think Lewis was trying to teach the reader many points during this story. I loved this book as a child, and I still enjoy it now, an amazing world of magic and friendship!

Paul wrote: "She probably achieved it by the same amazing magic that I used to eat Turkish Delight in Wales, there's no Turkey in Wales either, but we still manage to have Turkish Delight in the shops.

I think..."



ϮAʛʛⅇℛʊℵʛ {Supernatural Freak} Everyone should go listen to the song Turkish Delight on Music Inspired by the Chronicles of Narnia with all the Christian artists on it. It's hilarious that there's a song devoted to just that XD I really like tobyMac's Narnia And Rebecca St. James' Lion on there too.


Keely Because there is no turkey and Turkish Delight :)


Alana If we're going to pick on Turkish Delight, we have to ask the question of why they even speak English in Narnia. Why not Narnian? Why does the she-beaver have a sewing machine? etc....


ϮAʛʛⅇℛʊℵʛ {Supernatural Freak} Because the first humans in Narnia were English.


message 21: by Jo (new) - rated it 3 stars

Jo Good point. Although Mrs. Beaver's sewing machine is still a mystery.


Kaitlyn (2 B Read) lol yeah...no turkey in turkish delight...its like a jeli subtance. I've had it bfore....it's...interesting.


Sharell Fry's Turkish Delight has been made in England since 1914. I'm surprised no one took advantage of wikipediato look up this information...


message 24: by C.E. (new) - rated it 4 stars

C.E. Crowder re 22, I guess there's no delight in it either?

I'm not very troubled by Turkish Delight in Narnia given that a) it's kid lit, b) it's portal fantasy, c) it's magic.

I'm more troubled by examples like in "The Magic of Recluse" when the narrator compares something to a Chinese vase. That world has no intersection with Earth whatsoever, and nobody's casting a magic spell on him that would cause him to make that impossible metaphor.


message 25: by Michaela (last edited Jul 11, 2012 09:29AM) (new) - rated it 4 stars

Michaela Seriously?
You might just as well ask why there are several different kinds of mythology in Narnia, when there is no Greece or Rome.
I really don't think that it matters. These are wonderful books, and if you read it looking for everything to make sense, it's not going to because a lot of it is left to magic. I mean, how many wardrobes open to magical lands? :D And I've never seen Turkish Delight appear out of thin air either.


message 26: by [deleted user] (new)

The title of this thread made me laugh so much for some reason.
Love how many people are up there listing the ingredients in Turkish Delight and saying "There, look, there's no turkey in Turkish Delight."


Montana Phan I think Turkish Delight is a kind of dessert from the country of Turkey.
Then how did the Witch know about Turkish Delight at all being from Narnia? I think you brought up a good point that she did go to England and that Edmund was familiar with our world's culture and that his desire was for Turkish Delight, so the magic produced it.


message 28: by Jen (new) - rated it 5 stars

Jen Gentry I agree with the magic of desire. I believe C.S. Lewis would have given the witch the power to see into the hearts of men (and animals) to see their desires. I want to point out that when she ousted Edmond to his siblings she told them all that Edmond had betrayed them for "SWEETIES" not turkish delight specifically. So she knew his fondness or desire for sweets. Just my rambling thoughts.


message 29: by Kim (last edited Jul 12, 2012 12:14AM) (new) - rated it 5 stars

Kim HAHAHAHA!!! That question makes me laugh. Turkish Delight is a candy. With powdered sugar on it. I personally don't care for it...

Anyway. It doesn't matter. Whatever she used was magical, which would produce whatever food Edmund desired. In my case, it would be pizza or something...


Hannah There is no turkeys in Turkish delight is it even from turkey??


Adrienne Turkish delight is incredibly delicious. Its no wonder Edmund desired it. I'm desiring it right now. I'd like a rose flavored piece, please. =)


message 32: by Will (new) - rated it 4 stars

Will IV Hannah wrote: "There is no turkeys in Turkish delight is it even from turkey??"

The etymology of the word "Turskish" has nothing to do with the bird, but the country. Turkish delight was in fact invented by a man from Turkey.


єɱɱą aaaaaaahhhhhh. this is a good question!!!!!! hahahaahahahaha


message 34: by Hazel (last edited Jul 13, 2012 05:15PM) (new) - rated it 3 stars

Hazel this needs discussion?! A wizard (or in this case, a witch) did it.


message 35: by Marie (new) - added it

Marie Theron Turkish delight originated in the Minoan society and was not from Turkey, as far as I can remember, the flavor was Turkish. I must go back to my books again to find the correct facts!


message 36: by Will (new) - rated it 4 stars

Will IV Marie wrote: "Turkish delight originated in the Minoan society and was not from Turkey, as far as I can remember, the flavor was Turkish. I must go back to my books again to find the correct facts!"

According to Food Culture in the Mediterranean, it WAS from Turkey, as it was invented by a man living there, who later moved to Istanbul.


message 37: by Marie (new) - added it

Marie Theron Just to make sure Will, Did he live in Crete, and then later move to Istanbul in Turkey? I am now searching my old books on Crete to find the Turkish Delight story.


Emilyn  Kracher magic duh


message 39: by Will (new) - rated it 4 stars

Will IV Marie wrote: "Just to make sure Will, Did he live in Crete, and then later move to Istanbul in Turkey?"

When I said "living there" I meant to elaborate he was from from Kastamonu in Turkey, but started selling it in Istanbul, Turkey after he moved there.


message 40: by Paul (new) - rated it 5 stars

Paul ϮAʛʛⅇℛʊℵʛ {J-Hutch's GF} wrote: "Well, I think her magic works on desire. Because Edmund knew specifically what he wanted, I think it allowed her magic to be able to produce it. Plus, he couldn't stop desiring the enchanted Turkis..."

I agree with this! :)


message 41: by Marie (new) - added it

Marie Theron Will wrote: "Marie wrote: "Just to make sure Will, Did he live in Crete, and then later move to Istanbul in Turkey?"

When I said "living there" I meant to elaborate he was from from Kastamonu in Turkey, but st..."


Like all things, it is always a bit controversial to find out who was first. Here is the story I remembered and then found again in "The Secret of Crete" by Hans Georg Wunderlich: The antique name of Heraklion on the island of Crete was CANDIA. Candia was well-known for its honey from which they made their famous sweets. When the sweets from Candia was exported to Europe it became known as "candy". In 1669 Candia fell to the Turks, the sweets were still manufactured and exported but was now called "Turkish Delight"

The Secret of Crete by Hans-Georg Wunderlich


message 42: by Will (last edited Jul 15, 2012 09:12AM) (new) - rated it 4 stars

Will IV Marie wrote: "Like all things, it is always a bit controversial to find out who was first."

Definitely! Especially colloquialisms.

I'm currently reading Isaac Asimov' Beginnings: The Story of Origins and he talks about this very thing:
"Another point we might make is that beginnings can be a little fuzzy because changes almost invariably come through a process of evolution--that is, an accumulation of small changes, sometimes so small that you can't specify the point at which you can say, 'Here is the beginning.'"


message 43: by Marie (new) - added it

Marie Theron Definitely! Especially colloquialisms.

I'm currently reading Isaac Asimov' Beginnings: The Story of Ori..."
So true, Will! I would love to read that book! One I have here about the origins of words is "Made in America" by Bill Bryson. I think you probably know that one! An easy read and very enjoyable. I like it that they have about 13 different claims for first use of the word "OK"!


Vanessa Stone This is a hilarious thread. In response to a question about Christmas being in Narnia, it is clear that Aslan is a God/Christ metaphor. He is a sacrifice for the sins of Edmund. I think that it is safe to assume that as this is a children's novel that they could believe that Christmas is everywhere and is magical- and it fits within the allusions made. In the magician's nephew, the children witness the creation of Narnia by Aslan and the white witch is awakened from a world that she has already spoiled and enters Narnia through their mistake. Narnia would always be ruled by sons of Adam and daughters of Eve. I think with such strong Christian overtones (and Lewis' Christian apologetics) that Christmas seemed like a natural miracle after always having winter and never having Christmas- because if you are a child who celebrates Christmas it is the most magical time of the year and it signified that Aslan was returning (Christ was coming).


message 45: by [deleted user] (new)

The whole point of the Turkish Delight episode is that Edmund thought he could get something for nothing. The Turkish Delight was perfect, and impossible, illustrating the unnatural power of the White Witch.


message 46: by Joel (new) - rated it 4 stars

Joel Adams Hmm never thought of that... obviously meant to be a silly question, but of course the Turkish Delight was basically pulled from Edmund's own imagination/recollection of it.

A. Wayne
Author of Hell and Eternity: It's all Greek to me
http://anthonywayne.net


message 47: by CJ (last edited Aug 18, 2012 12:04AM) (new) - added it

CJ I like your question, Gabriel. Good point. I did not think of that before. . .

I guess this writer just wanted to incorporate a culture of something desired at the time as a good picture of a person desiring sin.

Now I wonder if many other famed writers make a flawed idea like that. . . but I do like many other peoples' opinions on here fascinating too. I do not want to say anyone on here is wrong.


Farheen Will wrote: "Well, the first king and queen were actually drawn into Narnia from Britain, so Christmas could have been introduced by them."

exactly.........


message 49: by Jo (new) - rated it 3 stars

Jo Or why would they be called Bacchus and Silenus and all the Roman names if they didn't ever have contact with ancient Rome? (Or did they?)


message 50: by John (new) - rated it 5 stars

John Falch How did Winnie the Pooh, a cotton bear, eat honey? These are children's books. We should not ask such questions. My 4th grade teacher, Miss Hall, read us the Lion, the Witch and the Wardrobe in class. We were enthralled, hanging on to every word. That's when I first heard of Turkish Delight. We all wanted some because it was supposed to be the best taste in the world, so good, that you could eat until you died from it. A more important question: Is Turkish Delight a candy or a gooey cookie?


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Books mentioned in this topic

The Lion, the Witch, and the Wardrobe (other topics)
Food Culture in the Mediterranean (other topics)
The Secret of Crete (other topics)
Beginnings: The Story of Origins (other topics)
Hell and Eternity: It's all Greek to me (other topics)

Authors mentioned in this topic

Isaac Asimov (other topics)
A. Wayne (other topics)