Chaos Reading discussion

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Books & Reading In General > The perks of being a book lover

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message 1: by Frozenwaffle (last edited Jun 13, 2012 02:42PM) (new)

Frozenwaffle | 163 comments Today at work I had the not very pleasant task of telling a customer, who had an appointment (one we were already extremely LATE for), that she had about 30min of waiting to do still.

I was expecting to hear the usual complaints and menaces and what-not (eheh) when she completely surprises me and says: "Oh, no problem! I have a book."

Not only did my heart burst with gratitude, but that really got me thinking. That probably is the greatest diference between avid book readers and the rest of the human race -> we are never bored. We always carry a book ( or hundreds, if you own a kindle :P)

What other diferences would you point out as significant between these two so different races inside our species? :D


Valerie the bookworm | 41 comments We who read like this have a the capacity to self-regulate. What I mean is, I can always go to a book if my mood is bad and I immediately feel better. Even if I cannot read in that moment, I sure am thinking about whatever book(s) I am reading. We also have vivid imaginations and rich inner landscapes, due to all of the different worlds we inhabit!

I was in a long drive thru line and I was reading all the way through it. The girl at the window apologized for the wait and I told her I had a book. She expressed the same gratitude you felt. I am never without one and consequently have never been pissed off in a line! :) Even at the DMV!


message 3: by Whitney (new)

Whitney | 1212 comments Mod
True that, having a book on hand makes waiting much less frustrating. Whenever I am meeting someone and they are late, instead of thinking about how inconsiderate they are I think "oh, good, I can finish this chapter!".

An article in The Guardian about how reading fiction makes people more empathetic: Reading Fiction


message 4: by Riona (new)

Riona (rionafaith) | 457 comments The customer in the OP could totally have been me. There have been studies done that say we spend years of our lives waiting on line, etc, and I am USING that time, damnit!

Whitney wrote: "Whenever I am meeting someone and they are late, instead of thinking about how inconsiderate they are I think "oh, good, I can finish this chapter!"

I've totally had this happen! "Oh man, I had to stop in the middle of a sentence when I got off the subway, now that my friend is late I can sip my coffee and finish!"


message 5: by Marisca (new)

Marisca (MishM) Hmmm, a difference: We care about how to spell words.
Text-speak is the equivalent of baby babble.
Don't even get me started.

Another difference: We don't mind spending hours alone with a good book. And we don't regard that as being anti-social (because it is NOT...), we regard is as a good use of time.

Also, another difference: Some of us can be heard complaining that we don't have enough shelf space for all our favorite books that we have carefully hand-picked to bring with us. Though I suppose with the advance of the Kindle, that cry is being quieted. But still.

OH! We like the smell of books. REAL books.


message 6: by Ruby , Mistress of Chaos (new)

Ruby  Tombstone [With A Vengeance] (rubytombstone) | 3260 comments Mod
Mish wrote: "Hmmm, a difference: We care about how to spell words.
Text-speak is the equivalent of baby babble.
Don't even get me started."


I think GR proves otherwise quite convincingly! Not all book lovers are spelling nazis (though I am). Depending on what you think of as "text speak", I also don't necessarily think book lovers have a problem with that either.


message 7: by Fiona (new)

Fiona (bookcoop) People who complain they're bored are their own worst enemies. Especially the ones who go on to claim they have "no spare time to read!"

I've never minded waiting, unless I've forgotten my book.


message 8: by Meghan (new)

Meghan | 8 comments We can strike up a conversation with a complete stranger.. and already have a topic to discuss*. We can be automatic friends with people we've never met... just based on a mutual understanding of what 'Frankenstein' was really all about.


*may only apply to socially inept people who are otherwise stuck talking about the weather, and end all conversations feeling like they've made a social gaffe.


message 9: by Derek (new)

Derek (derek_broughton) | 780 comments I hate having to wait for appointments - I mostly figure they're spending my time, and my time is usually considered at least as valuable as theirs in the marketplace (except, of course, when I'm waiting for my doctor...). But I have to admit, that I always consider waiting time to be reading time - and if I'm not being "productive", well, it's not my fault!

Ah, the smell of books! Not just the smell of books. The different smells of books: new books; old acidified paperbacks; the deep dark stacks of a really old library; leather bindings; ... A book is not just a book!

I do think book-reading is anti-social. That's OK, I'm not a very social person, and neither is my wife. My sister-in-law got divorced because her husband thought her reading was anti-social.

I agree that readers care about spelling - sure there are people here who don't, but I think it's true for the most part. & u cnt convnce ppl ur srios in txt spk. Thankfully, advanced text entry systems on smart phones should kill that soon.

My observation: non-readers are proud of their ignorance. I had the guys from work over for the Superbowl one year: I should have been reading, but I think it was a thank-you party, since they'd all helped out on my renovations! I guess the discussion came up because of all the bookshelves, but all these university-educated guys bragged about how little they read. One swore that he hadn't read a book since he graduated (probably 10 years).


message 10: by Frozenwaffle (last edited Jun 14, 2012 08:08AM) (new)

Frozenwaffle | 163 comments "self-regulate", yes! Without a doubt books are powerful mood changers, and so comforting sometimes! Chicken soup for the soul, I think someone said.

I care alot how to spell words, even worse now that we had a new "ortographic agreement" for Portuguese imposed on us... its like someone validated text speak and made it into a rule! :'(

Hmm, the diferent smell of books - that was what made me resistant of kindle at first. I need my daily book-smell fix! And the smells on those of antique and second-hand bookshops? Heaven.

I don't know about the anti-socialness of reading - I have to admit I hate it when I bump into someone I know when commuting to work or college, I don't open my book for fear of being rude but I secretly resent the poor person for interfering with my reading-time! On the other hand I have in more than one ocasion strike up a conversation with someone on the train or bus about the books we are holding - that has to balance it out, right? :D

One obsession I have is reading while I'm eating. I used to have my meals alone when I was a kid and I got used to use a book to keep me company - and I've never been able to kick that habit. I swear, the food doesnt taste so good if I cant sneak a read! Fortunately my boyfriend is totally okay with it and we determine meal time as my reading time and his documentary watching time. eheh.

People that brag about never reading... I dont get it. I feel really sad for them, 'cause they really have no idea what they're missing. I never know how to reply!


message 11: by Emy (new)

Emy | 34 comments I don't understand how people survive without reading, I really don't. Books have got me through some bad times and some lonely years, and I love being able to curl up and forget about the world. :)

Frozenwaffle said: "Hmm, the diferent smell of books - that was what made me resistant of kindle at first. I need my daily book-smell fix! And the smells on those of antique and second-hand bookshops? Heaven."

I was resistent to the kindle at first because I didn't think it could live up to the feel of holding a real, weight tome in your hands... but I have to admit, it's great for convenience's sake. I still prefer real books, but I love my kindle.


message 12: by Julissa (new)

Julissa (ta2kitty) I agree that there is nothing like the feel and smell of a real book but I do have the Kindle app on my iPhone so I'm never without reading material.

I also can't understand people who don't like to read (like my fiance.) I love reading and sharing the love :-) I started a lending library at the medical office where I work. The patients love it so much they bring me huge bags of books when they're done with them.

I can't imagine my life without books...


message 13: by Marisca (new)

Marisca (MishM) Ruby wrote:I think GR proves otherwise quite convincingly! "

GR=Goodreads, right?
Also, text speak: How r u? Ive g2g, c u @ 8. Also stuff like 'smh', 'hmu', or 'c u l8er' which is a favorite of my younger brother. Also, 'fav' instead of favorite bugs the living daylights out of me.
'lol' is O.K., since it can also stand for 'Lots of Love' and that is what I originally thought it was anyway.

Must just be me then, but it's a deterioration of the English language. And at the same time, fewer people are reading...or at least, reading fewer print books, which generally spell everything correctly. As opposed to what I've been hearing about the 'indie' e-books being published....

I guess it's just getting annoying that people aren't paying the proper respect to the English language that they ought to.

And no, neither of my parents are English professors. (They're both mathematicians, if anybody was curious.)


message 14: by Frozenwaffle (new)

Frozenwaffle | 163 comments Things like g2g, omw, brb, are abreviations with a purpose: when your playing an online game for example, you usually can't spend the amount of time it would take to write a proper sentence - you need to focus your attention elsewhere; When texting someone, out of lazyness or savings - I don't know about you, but not so long ago, here, you had to pay extra if you exceeded 150 letters in a text message. :P

The rest I mostly agree with you, I especially despise "liek", and others of the sort x.x


message 15: by Marisca (new)

Marisca (MishM) But when you're text-ing, you don't have a time limit. I guess saving money would be an O.K. reason. But at the same time...
Also, if you're typing 'g2g' as in, I'm leaving, just say I'm leaving. If you are. Brb is eh. I am guilty of using that one a lot, but I'm really desperately trying to break that habit.

My only real issue with the whole thing is that it IS leaking into academic papers at a severely alarming rate.
Also, if they're used for a purpose, use them for that purpose only. Otherwise you wear out the purpose unnecessarily and annoy a lot of people....

And what the heck is 'omw' supposed to stand for anyway?


message 16: by Frozenwaffle (new)

Frozenwaffle | 163 comments Mish wrote: "
My only real issue with the whole thing is that it IS leaking into academic papers at a severely alarming rate.
Also, if they're used for a purpose, use them for that purpose only."


Leaking into academic papers? That IS scary. Well, what I mean is - as long as you know how to write the word when it is needed, if sometimes you take a shortcut its alright with me. Omw means on my way. ^^


message 17: by Emy (new)

Emy | 34 comments Mish wrote: "My only real issue with the whole thing is that it IS leaking into academic papers at a severely alarming rate."

I'm giggling imagining this.

"It could be argued that William Blake's 'The Blossom' is about sex. LOL!"


message 18: by Marisca (new)

Marisca (MishM) Emy wrote: "It could be argued that William Blake's 'The Blossom' is about sex. LOL!"

From examples I've seen, it's worse than that. Thankfully (or hopefully) it doesn't get past the first draft, but still.

Frozenwaffle wrote: Omw means on my way.

Well...I guess it's good to know.


message 19: by Derek (new)

Derek (derek_broughton) | 780 comments Frozenwaffle wrote: "Things like g2g, omw, brb, are abreviations with a purpose: when your playing an online game for example, you usually can't spend the amount of time it would take to write a proper sentence - you n..."

I don't even believe that. The only online game I play is bridge, but I play a lot of it. I can type whole, grammatically correct, sentences, with proper spelling, in the time it takes most of the people I play with to construct 8 characters of text-speak. If you're going to spend hours of your day typing, it's a good idea to learn how to type. ( I had some spare time in my last year of high-school, so I took introductory typing - the most relevant course of my entire pre-university years)


message 20: by Ruby , Mistress of Chaos (new)

Ruby  Tombstone [With A Vengeance] (rubytombstone) | 3260 comments Mod
"Text-speak" is nowhere near as prevalent today as when there were character limits on everything though. There are some abbreviations that have stuck, but as long as they're abbreviations (or teh memes) as opposed to crap spelling, I don't have too many issues with it.

I'm not a super big fan of "imho" or "iirc" etc. - They seem more lazy than anything else to me, but I don't think it's responsible for the downfall of the English language. If you're wondering what is, it's the Americans. :)


message 21: by Whitney (new)

Whitney | 1212 comments Mod
Ruby wrote: "I don't think it's responsible for the downfall of the English language. If you're wondering what is, it's the Americans. ..."

U jus a hatar!


message 22: by Marisca (new)

Marisca (MishM) Well, Americans use text speak. And to be honest? I still get texts that are abbreviated in the extreme. It's kind of sad.

I also don't understand it at all--when it was 150 characters per text, I figured out better ways to phrase things or sent another one. Or called.


message 23: by Frozenwaffle (new)

Frozenwaffle | 163 comments Derek wrote: "I don't even believe that. The only online game I play is bridge, but I play a lot of it. I can type whole, grammatically correct, sentences. If you're going to spend hours of your day typing, it's a good idea to learn how to type."

I can type quickly enough, thats not what I meant. Bridge online can hardly be compared with a world of warcraft battleground, I'm guessing. So, scratch my previous comment and where it says online game write: online player versus player RPG where-you-can't-pause-to-type-for-too-long-if-you-wish-to-stay-alive :P

I maintain that if you use ocasional abreviations out of need to be quick or sheer ocasional lazyness, its all good as long as you do know how to write the words properly and know when its appropriate to write one way or the other.

Ruby wrote: "I'm not a super big fan of "imho" or "iirc" etc. - They seem more lazy than anything else to me, but I don't think it's responsible for the downfall of the English language. If you're wondering what is, it's the Americans. :)"

Run for cover! Pahaha! Ruby, I've seen you imho-ing mwauhaua - I imo myself alot. I'm not proud :D


message 24: by Ruby , Mistress of Chaos (new)

Ruby  Tombstone [With A Vengeance] (rubytombstone) | 3260 comments Mod
Whitney wrote: "Ruby wrote: "I don't think it's responsible for the downfall of the English language. If you're wondering what is, it's the Americans. ..."

U jus a hatar!"


We can discuss that when you learn to say "aluminium" :P

Frozenwaffle: I know. I hate myself every time I do it, but sometimes life is haaaaaaaarrrrrrrrrd! :(


message 25: by Kass (new)

Kass | 3 comments Ruby wrote: "Whitney wrote: "Ruby wrote: "I don't think it's responsible for the downfall of the English language. If you're wondering what is, it's the Americans. ..."

U jus a hatar!"

We can discuss that wh..."

I knoow. Same with me.


message 26: by Whitney (new)

Whitney | 1212 comments Mod
Ruby wrote: "We can discuss that when you learn to say "aluminium"..."

Whenever I'm in Canada I make sure to pick some up, the extra 'iu' makes me feel like I'm getting a real bargain.


message 27: by Marisca (new)

Marisca (MishM) Ruby wrote: "We can discuss that when you learn to say "aluminium"...


Al-u-min-i-um, right?
(I had a British Biology professor.)


message 28: by Whitney (new)

Whitney | 1212 comments Mod
On, wait. It's just an extra 'i". Not such a bargain as I was thinking. (We don't spell so good either.)


message 29: by Frozenwaffle (new)

Frozenwaffle | 163 comments I don't get it, whats this thing about aluminium?


message 30: by Whitney (last edited Jun 15, 2012 12:05PM) (new)

Whitney | 1212 comments Mod
Frozenwaffle wrote: "I don't get it, whats this thing about aluminium?"

U.S.: Aluminum (4 syllables)
Rest of English speaking (et. al.) world: Aluminium (5 syllables).

Making us 20% more efficient!


message 31: by Frozenwaffle (new)

Frozenwaffle | 163 comments Oh, I didn't know that. Heheh, indeed, your letter saving is superb!


message 32: by Tammy (new)

Tammy | 9 comments Derek wrote: "all these university-educated guys bragged about how little they read. One swore that he hadn't read a book since he graduated (probably 10 years). "

I've had that happen so many times and I can't stand it. We live in a university town, which I thought would lead to more intellectual conversations with people I meet, but no. Although, and not to cast stones, some of that may be due to hanging around the business college folks -- they seem to take pride in disdaining the liberal arts studies and never reading anything other than the Wall Street Journal.

Oh, and I've got a difference between reading v. non-reading types: a non-reader will never need an extra suitcase to lug home the books bought on vacation (like I did when I visited a friend in the District of Columbia; AND I went over the per-suitcase weight limit).


message 33: by Ruby , Mistress of Chaos (new)

Ruby  Tombstone [With A Vengeance] (rubytombstone) | 3260 comments Mod
I have to admit, I'm about to up & move 2,000km away and the one thing making me smile right now is the thought of hand-picking a selection of books to get me through the first few weeks of no-tv and solitude. The job involves spending 5 days a fortnight living in a remote gulf community too, so I'm expecting a LOT of solitary reading time. Wow, do I hope there's a decent internet connection though....


message 34: by Derek (last edited Jun 17, 2012 05:38PM) (new)

Derek (derek_broughton) | 780 comments Ruby wrote: "I'm not a super big fan of "imho" or "iirc" etc. "

Well, sure, they're lazy - but a huge amount of progress in language comes about by virtue of laziness (all those contractions, f'rinstance). I'm only not a fan of "imho", because I've never seen anybody use it "humbly" (way to go, frozenwaffle - I saw, and admired, your replacement "imo").

frozenwaffle wrote: "I can type quickly enough, thats not what I meant. Bridge online can hardly be compared with a world of warcraft battleground, I'm guessing. So, scratch my previous comment and where it says online game write: online player versus player RPG where-you-can't-pause-to-type-for-too-long-if-you-wish-to-stay-alive :P"

Fine - I used to play Adventure when it was new! When they first started making text-based multiplayer games, we already had the ability to write our own macros for all the most common usages . If you're playing a game that doesn't let you generate a full sentence from two keystrokes, complain! I don't think people need to be able to write, themselves - but I do think the people that have to read their writing shouldn't have to be dragged down into illiteracy.

[hmmm. The preceding two paragraphs appear a little contradictory. My problem with text-speak is not the use of abbreviations - even if a casual reader can't understand them, they're typically "jargon": i.e., they're understood by the community that uses them. The problem though, is that a huge amount of text-speak is not abbreviation but a complete failure to understand the actual English. It may be an urban myth, but I've heard from two sources recently that the average Facebook user thinks "colon" is a type of perfume.


message 35: by Derek (new)

Derek (derek_broughton) | 780 comments Whitney wrote: "Ruby wrote: "We can discuss that when you learn to say "aluminium"..."

Whenever I'm in Canada I make sure to pick some up, the extra 'iu' makes me feel like I'm getting a real bargain."


Nice try. We say "aluminum".


message 36: by Marisca (new)

Marisca (MishM) Tammy wrote: "Oh, and I've got a difference between reading v. non-reading types: a non-reader will never need an extra suitcase to lug home the books bought on vacation (like I did when I visited a friend in the District of Columbia; AND I went over the per-suitcase weight limit). "

I love you. I wish I could afford to bring an extra, over-weight suitcase full of BOOKS. X.x AS it is I can barely get all my crap to college, because it all has to fit in two carry-ons. :(
The downsides of being a participant in a gear-heavy sport...*sigh*


message 37: by Whitney (new)

Whitney | 1212 comments Mod
Derek wrote: "Nice try. We say "aluminum"..."

Check you country, dude. I had a box of aluminium foil I bought in Canada in my drawer for ages. Maybe it's regional, or maybe it's changed, but I wouldn't make up something so pointless.

link: Neuman Aluminium Canada SEC;
link: this Canadian company uses both spellings in one paragraph
link: Alcon Aluminium


message 38: by Danielzinho (new)

Danielzinho | 5 comments Frozenwaffle wrote: "Today at work I had the not very pleasant task of telling a customer, who had an appointment (one we were already extremely LATE for), that she had about 30min of waiting to do still.

I was expec..."
I completely agree! A book is my all-time companion! Public transport, waiting room... Time definitely not wasted!


message 39: by Danielzinho (new)

Danielzinho | 5 comments Mish wrote: "Hmmm, a difference: We care about how to spell words.
Text-speak is the equivalent of baby babble.
Don't even get me started.

Another difference: We don't mind spending hours alone with a good boo..."
The smell of a book can never ever be replaced by all the Kindles in the world!


message 40: by Danielzinho (new)

Danielzinho | 5 comments Derek wrote: "I hate having to wait for appointments - I mostly figure they're spending my time, and my time is usually considered at least as valuable as theirs in the marketplace (except, of course, when I'm w..."

and it's this that really gets to me: people actually BRAGGING about not reading books, or having read one in years! It's like when students (I'm a high school English teacher) brag about how many F's they've got! Unbelievable!


message 41: by Frozenwaffle (new)

Frozenwaffle | 163 comments Derek wrote: "My problem with text-speak is not the use of abbreviations - even if a casual reader can't understand them, they're typically "jargon": i.e., they're understood by the community that uses them. The problem though, is that a huge amount of text-speak is not abbreviation but a complete failure to understand the actual English. It may be an urban myth, but I've heard from two sources recently that the average Facebook user thinks "colon" is a type of perfume. "

O.O You're kidding, right? :D
With that I can agree 100%, and all joking aside, my point was only: if you know how to write properly in whatever language, then its ok if you use abreviations for convenience. that's all I defend, everything else is wrong, wrong, WRONG - in my never humble opinion! ehehe ^^


message 42: by Derek (last edited Jun 18, 2012 07:11AM) (new)

Derek (derek_broughton) | 780 comments Whitney wrote: "Derek wrote: "Nice try. We say "aluminum"..."

Check you country, dude. I had a box of aluminium foil I bought in Canada in my drawer for ages. Maybe it's regional, or maybe it's changed, but I wou..."


No, really, we (English Canada) don't ever (in the 40+ years I've lived here) user "aluminium". I just checked the kitchen, though, and noticed that the French side of the box says "papier d'aluminium".

It may exist in corporate names - after all, the internationally accepted chemical name of the element is "aluminium" - but we don't _use_ those. You referenced a Canadian subsidiary of a foreign (Austrian) company, a Quebec company (with a rather poorly translated English website), and a very old Canadian company always called simply "Alcan"


message 43: by Whitney (new)

Whitney | 1212 comments Mod
Derek wrote: "I just checked the kitchen, though, and noticed that the French side of the box says "papier d'aluminium"..."

Now that you mention it, I think it was the French side that marked my box of aluminum foil as Canadian. But even if it was the French, my original post stands, I DID get the extra "i" on my box of foil. Nyah nyah. Plus the added bonus of cultural imperialism that led English speaking Canadians to use the American pronunciation. I count it as payback for "Loverboy".


message 44: by Ruby , Mistress of Chaos (new)

Ruby  Tombstone [With A Vengeance] (rubytombstone) | 3260 comments Mod
Whitney wrote: "I count it as payback for "Loverboy". ..."

Well, you know Derek. He's gotta do it his way. Or no way at aaaaaalllllll...


message 45: by Whitney (new)

Whitney | 1212 comments Mod
Ruby wrote: "Well, you know Derek. He's gotta do it his way. Or no way at aaaaaalllllll..."

True, that crazy boy was born to run and born to dream!


message 46: by Tammy (new)

Tammy | 9 comments Ruby wrote: "Whitney wrote: "I count it as payback for "Loverboy". ..."

Well, you know Derek. He's gotta do it his way. Or no way at aaaaaalllllll..."


Thank you so much for getting THAT song stuck in my head all day :)


ᴀʀɪ [ hands up if you're feeling the vibe now ] Oh, the pleasures of reading!

I can name quite a few, but I would say that the big one is that I never really paid any attention in my classes. Always reading under the desk. :)


message 48: by Ruby , Mistress of Chaos (new)

Ruby  Tombstone [With A Vengeance] (rubytombstone) | 3260 comments Mod
Whitney wrote: "Ruby wrote: "Well, you know Derek. He's gotta do it his way. Or no way at aaaaaalllllll..."

True, that crazy boy was born to run and born to dream!"


I just hope he's not makin' love to whoever he pleases....


message 49: by Mike (new)

Mike Pomery (mikepomery) | 8 comments I can think of few things more equalising to mood and mind than sitting by a warm fire, sheltered from the pouring rain that's whispering persistently upon the tin roof above, a musty tome in one hand and a warm pipe in the other. The aroma of old paper, charred firewood and good tobacco is one of the highlights of my winter days.

When I open a book, even in the middle of summer, echoes of that comforting retreat are felt; the book anchoring feelings of contentment. A good story helps too... :D


message 50: by Whitney (new)

Whitney | 1212 comments Mod
Jim wrote: "Here, this will fix it. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TmjdZK..."

Yep. Another weapons grade ear worm.


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