Oh Canada discussion

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Who's your favorite Canadian author?

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Richard At the top of the list for me is Alice Munro. I also like: Rudy Wiebe, Anne Hébert, Gabrielle Roy and Roch Carrier. I liked some but not all of: Margaret Laurence and Robertson Davies. I really enjoy the poetry of Bernadette Rule.


uh8myzen | 2 comments Richard wrote: "At the top of the list for me is Alice Munro. I also like: Rudy Wiebe, Anne Hébert, Gabrielle Roy and Roch Carrier. I liked some but not all of: Margaret Laurence and Robertson Davies. I really ..."

I have always enjoyed Roch Carrier... my favourite though is definitely LA Guerre, Yes Sir!.

LA Guerre, Yes Sir! (Anansi Fiction Ser 10)


Terry Frances Itani
Rohinton Mistry
Ami McKay
Miriam Toews
Lawrence Hill
Sheree Fitch


Purcheria | 1 comments My favorite is Kelley Armstrong


Cathy Buchanan (CathyMBuchanan) | 6 comments If I'm only allowed one, it's Margaret Atwood.


Shannon (sianin) | 25 comments Mod
Terry wrote: "Frances Itani
Rohinton Mistry
Ami McKay
Miriam Toews
Lawrence Hill
Sheree Fitch"


Terry, I love that you included Sheree Fitch. She wrote one about monkeys in a kitchen that I loved to read out loud to my son.


Terry Ah! I will track that down for my Grandkiddies Shannon. The Sheree Fitch book that I recently enjoyed was "The Graver Savers" written for youth or adult readership.


Craig Hugh MacLennan. Friends always groan when I foist another MacLennan book on them. They complain of how dry he is but there is so much wisdom in his books I'm always blown away. Honourable mention to Gordon Korman as his books really started my love of reading as a kid.


Laima | 2 comments Alan Bradley - I'm a fan of his Flavia de Luce series


Jean Leblanc | 1 comments So far Atwood and Martel, but those are the only Canadian authors I've read. I spent about 10 years of my youth in the US (still there, will hopefully be back soon) so I only started reading CanLit a few months ago. Reading Atwood now, plan on starting Robertson Davies soon, unless I find Mordecai Richler somewhere. US bookstores almost never have anything more than Barney's Version.


Notty I am so apolitical and will not voice my opinions as to which party to vote for, however, one of the members of our book club suggested 'best laid plans' by Terry Fallis, so thought I'd better read it, I'm the newest member of our book club, but Intotally enjoyed it! so much so aI read his second book! Okay so I know that you are going ton poo-poonmy selection, because it's not having depth, soul, whatever you talk about, but these are some funbooks! So my thoughts!


Lbaker | 3 comments I commented earlier, but realized I missed Ivan Coyote - she writes short stories almost in an essay style as well as one novel. Her books invariably make me laugh out loud and cry at least once - she is incredibly talented.


Shannon (sianin) | 25 comments Mod
Hey Notty, don;t let anyone poo poo your selections and if you enjoy them that is fantastic. If you can explain why you enjoy them even better. I haven;t read any Fallis so have no comment whatsoever.


Craig Notty wrote: "I am so apolitical and will not voice my opinions as to which party to vote for, however, one of the members of our book club suggested 'best laid plans' by Terry Fallis, so thought I'd better read..."

I just read "Best Laid Plans" last week and I thought it was really good. It was predicable but also a very funny look at Canadian politics on both local and federal levels. Looking forward to reading the sequel.


Laima | 2 comments Shannon wrote: "Hey Notty, don;t let anyone poo poo your selections and if you enjoy them that is fantastic. If you can explain why you enjoy them even better. I haven;t read any Fallis so have no comment whatsoever."


Thanks Shannon - I agree with you! I haven't read the book but do remember Terry when he was at McMaster University. I'll put it on my to read list.


Kane Faucher (DocX) | 7 comments Dare I say it? Ernest Buckler. With respect to Findley, I only very much enjoyed Headhunter. I've never thought much of Atwood when compared to more engaging literary concepts as I find in European or a small number of American authors (such as Pynchon, Gass, Barth et al). Folks like Niedzviecki and Coupland can be a bit of fun. Bok et al seem stuck in the Yale deconstruction time-warp, but I think new talent on the rise is worthy of mention here: Alessandro Porco and Jacob Scheier. Nathan Whitlock, too.


Lulu (LuluEllis) | 2 comments Kane wrote: "Dare I say it? Ernest Buckler..."

Kane, I love The Mountain and the Valley by Ernest Buckler.
And The Weekend Man, by Richard B.Wright. For the writing style, not the plot.
Timothy Findley is my favourite because he wrote the way I think.
And I like Hugh MacLennan, Austin Clark, Adele Wiseman, Morley Callaghan, W.O.Mitchell...


Deborah (LovesRagdollCats) | 1 comments Kelley Armstrong would be my favourite Canadian author.


Melanie | 2 comments Lawrence Hill and Elzabeth Hay with a posthumous mention for Carol Shields.


Wendy Bertsch (philosophe) I'm surprised that more people haven't mentioned Pierre Berton, who wrote history like it was the most exciting fiction...as well as being a superlative humorist. You can't do better, to learn about Canada, than read Pierre Berton.


message 71: by Lulu (last edited Jun 19, 2012 04:36AM) (new)

Lulu (LuluEllis) | 2 comments Wendy wrote: "I'm surprised that more people haven't mentioned Pierre Berton, who wrote history like it was the most exciting fiction...as well as being a superlative humorist. You can't do better, to learn abou..."
Wendy, my husband isn't a big reader, but he devours books on history (how many people read big thick history textbooks in bed?), and Pierre Berton is one of his favourites. To his dismay, he has read them all.


Melanie | 2 comments Lulu wrote: "Wendy wrote: "I'm surprised that more people haven't mentioned Pierre Berton, who wrote history like it was the most exciting fiction...as well as being a superlative humorist. You can't do better,..."

The Secret World of Og was one of my favourite books as a child. A good friend of mine had a playhouse in her backyard that her father had built for her (from scratch) and I always worried that we would be captured by the Ogs!! His "grown up" books didn't really do it for me, but I did enjoy his book on the Dionne quints.


writer... (goodreadscomwriter) | 5 comments Just in case this has slipped past anyone,
The ongoing Canadian Reading Challenge {#6} has just begun it's new year [july 1 2012 - july 2013]
all who read Canadian authors or Cdn locations are welcome to join anytime during the year ~ intro & more details HERE thought you'd all likely qualify :)


Marc Leroux | 1 comments For fiction I'm currently going through all the Louise Penny

For non-fiction, Desmond Morton and Tim Cook


Rachelle (Awaken80) | 3 comments Never heard of this before, writer... Thanks, I'll check it out!


Kgoffin | 1 comments My favorites are:
Timothy Findley
Margaret Atwood
Rohinton Mistry
Douglas Coupland
Guy Vanderhaeghe


Betty | 1 comments After all these years, it's still Lucy Maud Montgomery. I read all her books once every decade.


James (jbgusa) | 1 comments Mine is Farley Mowat, dating from my childhood reading of Lost in the Barrens. Since then I have also read Never Cry Wolf by the same author.


Lost in the Barrens

Never Cry Wolf


Carole (C-WHY) | 1 comments Simple question:
Alice Munro
Mordecai Richler
"Life of Pi" was my favourite novel ever, but haven't read any more Yann Martel (except for his suggested reading list to Harper -- great!)
Runners up: Douglas Coupland, Joseph Boyden, Rohinton Mistry, Mavis Gallant, Anne Michaels, David Adams Richards

None of the rest I've scanned in the above postings quite make it "over the top of the wall" into real greatness for me. Or else, despite great powers as a writer (eg. Atwood) something about them irritates me. Miriam Teows certainly seems to be in fashion. I LOVED her biography of her father - and bought many copies for friends. But her fiction increasingly falls into the "irritating" bin.

I do read mostly non-fiction but it's really difficult to list authors in that category -- oh yes: the author of The Golden Spruce & of The Tiger -- he's fantastic -- John Vaillant.


message 80: by C. (new)

C. (Riedel) Hello from central Canada! I'm Carolyn and my absolute favourite is Lyn Hamilton, may she rest in peace. Her covers and archaeological theme attracted me numerous times but picky Amazon reviews deterred me. Never have I been more glad I ignored them and never have they been more wrong. The novel beat up the most was "The Celtic Riddle" and I found it best of all.

Along with educational culture, I love her style which doesn't stop to describe the obvious. If she's checking something out at a university, we don't need the car ride there - we move along. She does weave lovely descriptions; colour where it counts and information where it counts.


Shannon (sianin) | 25 comments Mod
Carolyn, I really enjoyed Lyn Hamilton's books as well. Great easy to read mysteries where often I would learn something.


David Danson (DavidDanson) | 1 comments Sheila Watson's "The Double Hook" is quintessential Canadian modernist lit.


Bernie Charbonneau (Skigolf) | 1 comments I would like to throw my 2 cents in on a great historical fiction writer who's last three novels deal with the war of 1812. I have read numerous books about our little skirmish with, at the time was a relative new country called the United States of America, and found most to be a bit dry. Mr. Tom Taylor changed all that for me. With his Jonathan Westlake character front and center in all three novels, I could not help but be engrossed in our history all over again. Strongly recommend!

Brock's Traitor
Brock's Railroad
Brock's Agent


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