Goodreads Authors/Readers discussion

112 views
Author Resource Round Table > And the most effective tactic for marketing your book...

Comments (showing 1-40 of 40) (40 new)    post a comment »
dateDown arrow    newest »

message 1: by Andrew (new)

Andrew Chamberlain (AndyChamberlain) | 48 comments ...is actually writing well!

I'm not trying to be facetious. I'd like to make a serious point here and I'd be intersted in what the rest of you think. We can try all kinds of strategies to get our work out there and noticed, and of course some of them are effective. But do we need to spend as much time on improving our skills and delviering a quality product as we do on marketing?

Any views on this?

Andy


message 2: by J.D. (last edited Jun 09, 2012 10:47PM) (new)

J.D. Hallowell | 62 comments Andrew wrote: "...is actually writing well!

I'm not trying to be facetious. I'd like to make a serious point here and I'd be intersted in what the rest of you think. We can try all kinds of strategies to get our..."


I would say that we need to spend far more time developing skills and polishing our work than we do on marketing it. Writing well draws on skills developed over a lifetime.

This doesn't mean that marketing isn't important, only that it is more important for what we are selling to be something worth reading in the first place.


message 3: by Andrew (new)

Andrew Chamberlain (AndyChamberlain) | 48 comments JD - agreed.

So what is the best way for authors to refine their craft? I think you've provided us with one answer - it's persistence and workover a long period of time, but what are the best resources to help? Is it books on writing? Courses (distance, residential, a degree?) What do we think would be most useufl to us as writers to help improve the quality of our work?


message 4: by Keith (new)

Keith Nixon | 3 comments For me it is constructive feedback from critical reviewers...


message 5: by Steph (new)

Steph Bennion (stephbennion) | 166 comments I found the HarperCollins Authonomy website very helpful. I had a few chapters of my novel Hollow Moon on there whilst I was editing, proofing, etc. and the feedback I got from other writers was really useful. I wouldn't really recommend Authonomy as a way of getting noticed by HarperCollins or anyone else, as it seems to be nigh impossible to get your book to the editor's desk unless you relentlessly plug it to other users. I will probably use the website to get feedback on future works-in-progress, though.


message 6: by Sharon (new)

Sharon (fiona64) | 580 comments At the end of the day, discoverability is actually more important than marketing. You can market the hell out of your product, but if no one can find it ... well, there it is.

(This is one of the key reasons I'm against KDP Select, BTW ... the exclusivity clause limits your discoverability to only those who have Kindles, and there are a whole lot of other eReaders out there.)


message 7: by Andrew (new)

Andrew Chamberlain (AndyChamberlain) | 48 comments Steph - thanks for the link, very useful!

Sharon - speaking as someone who is in the midst ofa KDP select contract, I have to agree with you. I'm struggling to see what the point of KDP select is vs KDP vanilla - other than you get 5 days out of 90 to promote your work for free, a small benefit frankly.

Andy


message 8: by Gail (new)

Gail Cleare (GCleare) | 2 comments I agree with Steph that the HC site Authonomy is a great place to find valuable feedback from other writers. The problem is that most of the people who comment on your book say something nice and vague, because they want you to like them and back their book. Many people who comment do not appear to have read your book at all, in fact, or only just the first chapter. However, the forums on Authonomy are where you can join a virtual writing group in your genre and get unbiased, frank, detailed critiques from other authors who want the same in return. Most of the writers in the Women's Fiction group I founded actually read the entire manuscript of whichever book we are working on, and many give line edits in addition to general comments. When you revise, you can ask for a second read. When I first joined there was no group for my genre so I started one and within a few days, had a dozen members.


message 9: by Terry (new)

Terry Tyler (TerryTyler) | 93 comments Gail wrote: "I agree with Steph that the HC site Authonomy is a great place to find valuable feedback from other writers. The problem is that most of the people who comment on your book say something nice and v..."

That's interesting - I joined Authonomy obviously before your decent group (it was a fair while back) and I thought it was awful - people were posting stuff on there that was SERIOUSLY first draft stuff and getting all these comments saying it was likely to be next in line for the Booker Prize - ludicrous, and in the next breath they'd be saying things like "I'll rate your book and put it on my shelves, now will you do the same for mine', and similar. I only used the site for about 2 months and I don't think I ever saw anyone say anything bad about anyone's work, it was ridiculous. Once I tried some constructive criticism, and got some serious flak for it. I think this sort of atmosphere of encouragement is completely unhelpful as it does not prepare writers for the real world, where they will be rejected by agents or, should they self-publish, be slammed by readers who don't want to read stuff that's full of grammatical and punctuational errors.

In reply to earlier comments, I think there's sometimes too much emphasis on the marketing as opposed to making sure the product is marketable!

I think KDP Select is great, but I tend to promote mostly to UK readers, so maybe it's different. Best way to become successful is to write a really, really good book, I think....


message 10: by Sherri (new)

Sherri Moorer (SherritheWriter) | 121 comments I agree completely. We need to not only write, but write well. There are some that say don't worry about the quality of your work and to write every day, even if it's crap - but to me, that seems like a waste of time. It's better to spend your time studying the craft of writing, brushing up your skills, and planning and writing quality work that can be released for readers to enjoy. I'd rather take a year to educate myself, plan, and write a really well done book than fill up my hard drive with nonsense and junk that's not even publishable.


message 11: by Robert (new)

Robert Polevoi I don't understand much of the deabate about Kindle Select. You agree not to go .epub for 90 days in exchange for the ability to distribute free over Amazon. That's all there is to it. Some people get a lot of attention and reviews from the free distribution, so it's worth it. Other people get little or no attention or reviews from it, so it didn't work out. It would be a big gamble if it wasn't a mere 90 days and if B&N sales (and other .epub) sales were a big factor for new authors just starting out. But it's a small trade for maybe a little attention. And you have no idea how it will work out for you unless you try. Every case is different.

Marketing means being discovered. People don't buy your book because of what you say about it, but because of what other people say -- hence the numerous plugs and review quotes on book covers and jackets. People read what they think others are reading, and the biggest factor in the commercial success of a book is the perception that it's popular -- a chicken and egg situation if there ever was one. But it's obvious that publishers have always marketed books on sales, as "bestsellers." It seems that people want to feel part of some group or social phenomenon when choosing books to read. Not much different than with motion pictures, really.


message 12: by Andrew (new)

Andrew Chamberlain (AndyChamberlain) | 48 comments Hi Sherri

I'm with you part way on this, I think there is a stage where writers need to have the discipline of sitting down and simply writing, getting stuff down. The problem comes when this material is released as a final product when it's no where near ready. I tend to think - sure write stuff even if it's not brialliant, but just please dont' inflict it on others.

There's are a few other really difficult issues here, and I am not sure how to get around them.

First, some people just wont write very well and no matter how much they practice they'll never be miuch good at it, and they just need to accept that and get on with painting or acting or selling real estate or whatever they do.

Second, some people wont take straight criticism because they can't cope with it even when it is correct and perceptive. These people are too emotionally attached to their work and can't cope with any kind of critique. It is within our gift as writers NOT be one of these people, we must be brave and take the hit of honest criticism.

Third, as has been pointed out here, it's actually really hard to get good constructive cricitism, and that's mainly because not everyone can give it, and if they can it's still hard work and time consuming to properly review a book.

I'd join Gail's group if the genre was suited to my work!

A


message 13: by Kate (new)

Kate Loveday (kateloveday) | 24 comments Hi Andrew,
I have been following this discussion and I agree with you. I think it is of great interest to all writers who have not yet reached their desired level of sales as well as to those who dream of having a book of their own published. I believe that everyone who writes desperately desires to write a book that will be enjoyed by their readers, but to do so requires a lot of hard work, patience and gritting determination, as well as talent.
With self –publishing these days anyone can put up a book, and I know how tempting it is to do that as soon as you finish the story, but writing the story is the fun part, it’s when it’s finished that the hard work begins. It is in the re-writing (and every book needs a minimum of one re-write, no matter how much of a genius you are!) that the story gains the polish it deserves. If you really want to become the best you can, then it must be done. I posted a blog a couple of weeks ago, on “Writing is a craft”, and it had the largest number of hits of any blog I have done, which suggests we all want to improve our writing.
I have had three books published in paperback. I sent them all for professional reviews as each one was published, and was fortunate to receive four and five star reviews, but even with that, as an unknown author, my sales have been only in the hundreds. Not the dizzying heights we all aspire to! In my local area, where I could promote, my books have become fairly well-known, but that is far from the success I hoped for when I became a writer, and I see e-books as being able to reach a larger market. I hope I’m right, but marketing is not easy – to me it is harder than writing can ever be. But the first thing must always be to write the best book you can.


Inheritance


message 14: by Rebecca (new)

Rebecca Douglass (RDouglass) | 198 comments I guess my problem with the question asked in the initial post is that I don't think there should be any question of marketing until the writing has been polished and the product is professional. And everyone needs an editor/outside reader. I have a couple of friends who have the skills, as well as a number of readers who are more likely just to tell me they love it (not helpful in one sense, but very helpful in another!).

One thing I'll be doing with the sequel to "The Ninja Librarian" that I didn't do the first time is getting feedback from kids (I didn't the first time because I thought I was mostly writing for adults. Since the kids have proven me wrong, I'll work harder on making it for them).

I've been reading and talking to grade school classes, and my theme is largely the number of revisions it takes me to get from "great idea" to "book ready to publish." Usually at least 5, plus a couple more readings to polish and remove the last of the typos (there's still one typo in my book; I need to re-load it to CreateSpace and get rid of it--and that's maybe the best thing with POD publishing!). Revision/editing is part of what the kids learn in Language Arts starting as early as 2nd grade, but it's a hard sell, as we all know!

So what do I think a writer can do to improve? For one thing, read, and read the good stuff, by writers who use language well and craft good stories. Of course, it helps if you started that when you were 5 but it's never too late to steep yourself in good writing.

Then practice like hell. I have "finished" drafts of at least 3 novels in my drawer, what you might call practice runs. I'm a firm follower of Anne Lamott's advice about writing crappy first drafts, but that does sometimes leave you with years of work to make it into a good tenth draft. Still, just as with music, painting, or any other art, I don't know of any shortcuts. You have to practice, and most of what you practice isn't meant for the concert hall.


message 15: by Zee (new)

Zee Monodee (Zee_Monodee) | 117 comments I agree with this line - write the best book you can, then get it out there.

But for me, I've found 'hard' marketing doesn't work. I also have to find ways to get my books out there without too much stress and/or intense daily involvement (health issues & the need to take it easy after cancer. Anyhow...).

What did work (and I've noticed this for my past 2 releases) is that people who consider you a nice person are more inclined to recommend your book without any need to ask them to, and when they know you, they do wish to check out your work.

I always say this - no one wants to help a cow. So don't be a cow, be nice and genuine, and make real friends. These people are the ones who will carry you and your books forward. :)


message 16: by Michael Cargill (new)

Michael Cargill Cargill (MichaelCargill) | 217 comments One thing I would recommend, is to upload your books to a torrent site and post about it on the forums. Include a picture of one of the covers.

I did this a while ago, and my blog got lots of hits from people Googling for more information about me.

For those not in the know, torrent sites are where people get pirated films, games, music, etc.


message 17: by Sharon (new)

Sharon (fiona64) | 580 comments Andrew wrote: "Steph - thanks for the link, very useful!

Sharon - speaking as someone who is in the midst ofa KDP select contract, I have to agree with you. I'm struggling to see what the point of KDP select is ..."


Exactly -- especially when you can create coupons any time at Smashwords, LOL.

To Robert above: I have talked with many eReader users over the course of time. Many of them use readers with ePub technology (vs. .mobi). All of them (and as my reader uses ePub technology, I should include myself here, really, and say "all of us") find the KDP Select program to be a slap in the face, because the message received from authors who go this route is "We don't want you in our audience." And then there is the discoverability issue *again.*

If someone who uses an ePub reader cannot find your book in the format they use, it doesn't matter how much marketing you do; there is no discoverability. Are you willing to trade that for a bunch of freebie downloaders who may never read your book? I know people who got Kindles for the winter holidays who tell me they have downloaded hundreds and hundreds of books without paying a dime ... and that they don't think they'll read most of them.


message 18: by Sharon (last edited Jun 11, 2012 05:59AM) (new)

Sharon (fiona64) | 580 comments Sherri wrote: "I agree completely. We need to not only write, but write well. There are some that say don't worry about the quality of your work and to write every day, even if it's crap - but to me, that seems l..."

Andrew wrote: "Steph - thanks for the link, very useful!

Well, there is a certain something to "put it on the paper, even if it's crap" ... because you shouldn't be editing as you write. That does not mean that you publish unedited crap, though.
Sharon - speaking as someone who is in the midst ofa KDP select contract, I have to agree with you. I'm struggling to see what the point of KDP select is ..."

To Andrew above, re freebies on KDP-S: Exactly -- especially when you can create coupons any time at Smashwords, LOL.

To Robert above: I have talked with many eReader users over the course of time. Many of them use readers with ePub technology (vs. .mobi). All of them (and as my reader uses ePub technology, I should include myself here, really, and say "all of us") find the KDP Select program to be a slap in the face, because the message received from authors who go this route is "We don't want you in our audience." And then there is the discoverability issue *again.*

If someone who uses an ePub reader cannot find your book in the format they use, it doesn't matter how much marketing you do; there is no discoverability. Are you willing to trade that for a bunch of freebie downloaders who may never read your book? I know people who got Kindles for the winter holidays who tell me they have downloaded hundreds and hundreds of books without paying a dime ... and that they don't think they'll read most of them.


message 19: by Josh (new)

Josh Stallings | 1 comments Great subject. For years I felt legacy publishing houses where too driven by sales and next bock-buster mentality. As apposed to building careers of good writers. And the after I started publishing books that I had spent years to perfect - was gripped by the desire to put out as much product as possible, get my numbers up, check my stats every hour. What I have discover for myself is, that what ever my goal might be, I can only write edit, edit again, edit one more time, get notes from several editors and edit again, so quickly. Sad fact is it takes me over a year to get a novel correct.

I have had to take the long view to marketing my work. What I have decided is that it may take the next ten years before I, if lucky, get close to selling in numbers large enough to help pay the bills. But what I am doing is building a brand. I can't put anything out with my name on it until I am sure it is the best I know how to write it.

It seems that book sales are ultimately driven by readers talking to readers. The only way to get that is to write the best book we can and hope it connects with readers. Long way around to say, yep I agree.


message 20: by Steph (last edited Jun 11, 2012 03:41PM) (new)

Steph Bennion (stephbennion) | 166 comments Gail wrote: "I agree with Steph that the HC site Authonomy is a great place to find valuable feedback from other writers..."

Yes, I forgot to mention that you need to join one of the writers' groups to get proper, serious feedback. I write sci-fi, but there's a discussion forum for most genres.


message 21: by Andrew (new)

Andrew Chamberlain (AndyChamberlain) | 48 comments Steph

I'd be interested in finding a writers group for sci-fi - where is this group that you belong to?

Thanks

Andy


message 22: by Steph (new)

Steph Bennion (stephbennion) | 166 comments Andrew wrote: "I'd be interested in finding a writers group for sci-fi - where is this group that you belong to?"

Hi Andy - It's the 'SF42' group on the Authonomy website forums (http://www.authonomy.com/forums/) - you can find it at: Forum -> Book Genre Message Boards -> Science Fiction -> Sci Fi Critique Group 2.0 SF42 . Moderator Ross is also a Goodreads author.


message 23: by Barbara (new)

Barbara Tarn (Barb65) | 61 comments Andrew wrote: "Steph

I'd be interested in finding a writers group for sci-fi - where is this group that you belong to?

Thanks

Andy"


Or you can join David Farland's Writers forum, they're mostly sci-fi and fantasy writers...
http://farlandswritersgroups.com/
I had some good feedback for the first novel I put out there, but couldn't find a group who could go through a whole novel in a decent time (if you have a 30 chapters novel and can't give more than 2 a month to be critiqued, how long will it take to have the whole thing critiqued? Too long, at least for me! ;-) I move on! :-D).
It looks kinda dead now, but maybe there are still active groups there...


message 24: by Darlene (new)

Darlene Jones (Darlene_Jones) | 152 comments Micheal, where and how do we find these "torrent" sites?


message 25: by Michael Cargill (new)

Michael Cargill Cargill (MichaelCargill) | 217 comments There is http://isohunt.com/ and thepiratebay.se torrent sites, but others exist.

Creating a torrent isn't as simple as just uploading the files to the websites, it involves downloading a torrent client like utorrent - http://www.utorrent.com/

You create the torrent file, and then upload that torrent file to the torrent site.

Info here - http://www.utorrent.com/help/guides


message 26: by *Dr (new)

*Dr  DLN (DrDLN) | 145 comments I am member of authonomy. But have no clue what to do with it. I don't know how to invite friends. I invite you all to be my friends.
http://www.authonomy.com/writing-comm...


message 27: by Kevin (new)

Kevin Kierstead (Splendad) | 30 comments @ Robert; I mostly disagree.

I would only advise self-published authors to use KDP if they are brand new on the scene or as a last-ditch effort.

By using the program, you get a few bucks from people who essentially "borrow" your book, and you get some free promotion days (you make nothing, you HOPE that of all the free downloads that result that you'll get some reviews and popularity).

If you are already published and you've been out there for a while, and you're making meager to good sales, it would not be wise to decide to enroll in KDP select. First, take your books down off of every single other e-book sales/distribution site. The problem with that, other than the obvious shunning of half of the audience on the planet, is that you lose your followers from the other sites, and potentially, your ratings/standing.

I've used it, I made a few bucks, and I'm out and I'll never go back. It's wrong, frankly, to have all of your work exclusive to one site. It's the most blatant form of back-biting trickery I've ever seen developed in the world of writing.

Let nothing limit the size of your stage, ever. My 2.


message 28: by Darlene (new)

Darlene Jones (Darlene_Jones) | 152 comments Kevin, thank you for posting this. I've been against KDP from the beginning, didn't join and never intend to.


message 29: by Andrew (new)

Andrew Chamberlain (AndyChamberlain) | 48 comments Jaq

I'm with you, although specifically it's KDP Select that is a bit rubbish (rather than just KDP). With KDP you can still publish on Smashwords, but KDP select is like a three month jail term for your work.


message 30: by Cheryl (new)

Cheryl Landmark (clandmark) | 197 comments I haven't joined KDP Select, either, and don't intend to. I want my books to be available to as wide an audience as possible, not limit them to one exclusive site, even if that site is the mighty Amazon. Somehow, I just can't see this as a smart tactical move on my part, especially since I've heard negative things about the program.


message 31: by Steph (new)

Steph Bennion (stephbennion) | 166 comments Cheryl wrote: "I haven't joined KDP Select, either, and don't intend to..."

I get the impression that KDP Select only really helps if you have a back catalogue, in that offering a book for free encourages sales of your other works.


message 32: by Michael Cargill (new)

Michael Cargill Cargill (MichaelCargill) | 217 comments Did anyone else get an email from Facebook, which was a £25 free advertising voucher?

It said that I had tried to make an advert, which I vaguely remember doing about a month or so ago.

So, if anyone fancies getting £25 worth of Facebook advertising for free, click on the 'create advert' bit but don't do anything more!

I did use the voucher (you only get two days to use it) but it doesn't seem to have done anything.


message 33: by Ross (new)

Ross Harrison (RossHarrison) | 10 comments I'm in KDP Select, and it has been a complete waste of time for me. In a month and a half, I've had 3 borrows. That's it. The free days I've done got some interest, but I didn't see any noticable increase in sales after, and haven't had any reviews posted from it. Come August I certainly won't be renewing it - I could have been getting sales through Smashwords all this time! :(


message 34: by Katie Roberta (new)

Katie Roberta Stevens (njgrantwriter1) | 2 comments Thank you for sharing excellent ideas for book promotion. When books by Justin Beiber and Snookie get published and those by writer's don't, it's very frustrating. Also, if you watch a few hours of television, it seems that every celebrity on news and talk shows just published a book. Even if our books are well-edited and well reviewed, how can we get them noticed within a system that continuoulsy promotes celebrity?


message 35: by *Dr (new)

*Dr  DLN (DrDLN) | 145 comments Andrew wrote: "...is actually writing well!
I'm not trying to be facetious. I'd like to make a serious point here and I'd be intersted in what the rest of you think. We can try all kinds of strategies to get our..."


Marketing may play some role to initially let your work be known. But in the long run, it is the quality and value in your work that will sell.
______________
"We come to love not by finding a perfect person, but by learning to see an imperfect person perfectly" http://amzn.to/dMBLWW


message 36: by Arshad (last edited Jun 16, 2012 05:54PM) (new)

Arshad (pactarcanum) Steph wrote: "I get the impression that KDP Select only really helps if you have a back catalogue, in that offering a book for free en..."

I've found this to be true, when free days of the first book in my series drove sales of the rest of the books. Amazon continuously tweaks its search algorithms, however, so a strategy that works at one time may not be workable later. KDP Select started out as an impressive way to get wide exposure, but then they altered their search algorithms for visible placement on bestseller lists so that free downloads were much less of a factor. Immediately, Select became a much less attractive tool, one which has outlived its usefulness.

Rebecca wrote: "So what do I think a writer can do to improve? For one thing, read, and read the good stuff, by writers who use language well and craft good stories."

The comment that reading great authors to improve your language skills is valid, but requires a certain level of sophistication that allows you to read critically and tease out the specific elements of the text that are exceptional. Otherwise you're just getting a piecemeal impression of the elements that are most obvious, and might miss the overall architecture of the story and how it hangs together.

I think writers at the start of their careers need to educate themselves about language and story structure before they can really apprehend the lessons to be learned from more accomplished authors. It's like any career: training is required until you have the basics to be able to learn on your own. Only then can you develop your skills through practice and criticism.

Side note: Another SciFi/Fantasy writer's group can be found at: http://sff.onlinewritingworkshop.com/. The critiques can be kind of hit or miss though.


message 37: by Jackie (new)

Jackie Krasuski (SpintronixGuard) | 12 comments I am a full-time teacher and closet writer. I only put my book out there on Kindle at first because I wrote it, had it edited, was told it was good, and didn't want it wasting its life in my hard drive. So I put it out there on Kindle and then, when KDP Select came up I heard a lot of good things about it so I enrolled. My sales - even though it was only on Kindle anyway - actually went down at that point.

I had no interest in doing serious marketing or having writing be my full-time career so I didn't worry too much about it; I left it enrolled there for the entire school year. Now that it is summer and I am doing some more serious research and marketing (in between summer camps and lesson planning) I can't wait for my book to get free of KDP Select.

Hopefully once that is through I can use a lot of these marketing strategies that you have all been talking about to go out there and make a bit more of an impression. Since I am a teacher, it isn't about making money to me, it is about touching students. So many of the kids I teach need better role models, need books that touch on specific interests, and that's what I hope to give them.

A lot of the things you are saying about writing I have no problem with; many of the elements of good writing are taught in high school senior English. I was such a nerd in high school that I kept everything from that class, used it in my college English classes, and so on. I also have an endless array of people who are willing to proofread, edit, and discuss anything I throw at them. It is the marketing side I have a lot to learn about.

I think it needs to be a balance of good writing and good marketing. If you write an amazing book, that doesn't just mean that everyone will automatically pick it up and read it. And vice versa, if you market like crazy but your book is worthless, people are going to realize it is worthless and say as such. Good discussion. I'm taking it to heart.

Learning to Breathe (Spinsation #1) by J.M. Hope




message 38: by Trudy (new)

Trudy  Hodkinson | 5 comments Jackie i agree with your point that it is all about balance. Marketing your book can take over your life and you run the risk of spamming people. I suppose you must have an honest interest in books and authors. As a wife of an author ( and his now publicist,marketeer etc!) i think it is really important when you read a book write a review as a courtesy to the author. Join forums and discussions that interest you. As my old boss used to say 'people buy into people, then buy the product'.connecting with people who have similar interests to you is the most important and probably most rewarding side of marketing your book. Its tough out there but every good review makes it all the more satisfying:)good luck!


message 39: by Andrew (new)

Andrew Lawston (AndrewLawston) | 223 comments For marketing, I'm quite active in various forums, only mentioning the book in the approved promotion threads and otherwise just joining in discussions. I only join forums and discussions where I have something to say, and gradually people tend to take a look at my book.

I've probably spread myself too thin over too many forums, but this approach has meant that people feel they've discovered my book, rather than just being browbeaten into buying it. The reviews so far have been good, and with a base of nine 5 star reviews on Amazon, and a few more reviews in the pipeline, I'm hoping that word of mouth will gradually pick up.

And I also put $35 down on Goodreads self-serve advertising. So far without much impact, but it's all good.

The only direct and aggressive marketing I do is via my Facebook page - I post a link to a recent review once a week. I'm happy doing that as it's addressing an audience which have consciously opted in by 'liking' my page.

But yes, in general, all the marketing in the world won't save a truly dreadful book, so I put the bulk of my effort into writing something worth promoting in the first place.


message 40: by Margaret (new)

Margaret Sharp (MargaretLynetteSharp) | 237 comments Jackie wrote: "I am a full-time teacher and closet writer. I only put my book out there on Kindle at first because I wrote it, had it edited, was told it was good, and didn't want it wasting its life in my hard d..."

Hi Jackie,

I sympathize with the difficulties of marketing.
I have six books out there, with two reviews on Goodreads (both 5 star) but it's uphill getting the word out. I've been blogging for a year, with few sales to show. They say it takes time, so I live in hope!


back to top

unread topics | mark unread


Books mentioned in this topic

Inheritance (other topics)
Learning to Breathe (other topics)