Ian Somerhalder Foundation Book Club discussion

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Story Ideas - What inspires you?

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Mel (KindHobbit) | 1 comments I've always been fascinated with the genre world of Fantasy. I just love the idea of being able to make a movie in your mind creating magical creatures and characters. Which is why the genre is so inspiring. I believe a couple years ago I started writing a story on fallen angels and warriors. But I never finished it...it was on Quizilla haha. But I'm thinking of starting from scratch since I am officially out of high school and have more time on my hands. I just have to figure when to input time for reading since I have sooo many to read! :)


Kristen | 7 comments As an up and coming writer myself, I would have to say it's easy enough to write a story. The problem comes when you try to finish it. Listening to music, drawing from real life, and other things like that are a good inspiration, at least for me. Fantasy, romance, and science fiction are my preferred genres, but I can mix in other genres from time to time.


Jenny | 4 comments I write amateuristic stories as a hobby and I usually find inspiration in my daily life. I see something on tv or just on the streets and I'm like: Oh! I can use that.. Sometimes it's easy to produce a text. You just start writing and it just happens. It can be hard too though.. Inspiration can be hard to find when you don't have much spare time :)


Teresa | 8 comments When I had my rock band I sang a song called, "HELL IS FOR CHILDREN", which was about child abuse. The song was my dummer's idea. I had such a hard time singing that song, it just tore me up every time I had to sing it. The rest of the band said that's why it was good because I really felt it and I made the audience feel it too. Singing that song was one of the hardest things I ever had to do and I had to do it all the time. But no matter how many times I sang it the ache in my heart never diminished nor was I ever able to immunize myself agaist it.


Alexis | 1 comments I write as well, mostly short stories, though I am trying to piece together something longer. I've spent the semester trying a lot of different genres: sci fi, fantasy, romance, real fiction...ext. I definilty find inspiration in my past, in music, photographs, daily life. I use a cup of tea and a good play list to get started. I have written two short stories and a play (i'm currently on a second one) dealing with domestic abuse. It is amazing how many different point of views, tones, settings, and themes you can use within abuse stories to make the same topic seem different from story to story. And to see how you can change the mood to impact different readers differently. Its amazing how art can make the world a better place.


Barnyard ISF (BarnyardISF) | 120 comments I thought I wanted to write fantasy, then I realized I hadn't read much fantasy, more just animal stories that had to do with animal communication ie; body language. I traveled & lived in beautiful places, Alaska, Australia, Japan, New England, all around the U.S. Ending back at my home in the coastal Redwoods. Ah well, I have written journals at least & now I read fantasy. =)

I can read anything that has to do with King Arthur or old ancient lands like the Mabinogion. I prefer pre-motorized vehicles. Horse or on foot transportation I find adds to the natural description of the scenery.


Shawn (ShawnWilder) | 6 comments Inspiration is such a great thing to experience. When I don't think about it and stuff just starts volunteering out of my mouth, or an image suddenly appears in my head, these days I pounce on it!!!!


E.S. Lehman (ErikAuthor) | 1 comments It's an interesting question; inspiration? Well, I put a character in a setting, with a very vague idea of story, and see what happens. Stories grow from there, new characters walk in, settings expand, plots evolve. It is a first draft after all, and as Nora says, "You can't fix a blank page." So fill it, then fix it. I'm never in need of inspiration, the characters' supply it for me. I believe so many struggle with looking for inspiration, they get stuck staring at a blank page and filling journals. Not all stories pan out, about 4 out of ten are pursued. And there's always one gem in there. The key is to just write. Let the mind free and the story will come. But that's just my method. Works for me.


Kim Falconer (KimFalconer) | 284 comments Meditation, walks in nature, time alone. Definitely time alone! Everything comes alive when you're by yourself. Characters just start waking up around you.

That's when the Muse appears and you know you're life won't be your own again until the book is done. (and well done, hopefully!)


Barnyard ISF (BarnyardISF) | 120 comments That is how I feel about my experience out in the deep woods with the Free State. I have so much written, but there is so many more months to tell. You guys are so inspiring, I hope I can get back to it this summer & maybe at least get the first draft typed out. The same forest is actually in danger again this yr. Things are very touchy here politically so it is hard to imagine sharing, but I feel I can with this type of community around! The Ian Somerhalder Foundation inspires me! When I first joined, it felt like I was coming out of the closet: "Hi, I love the forest & I want it protected." I work with so many ranchers they don't know who I am. I am an Environmentalist.

Always thought I'd be a Scientist like my dad, until I realized that scientists are not paid to speak the truth anymore. I went to Alaska & the Wolf guys said they were sterilizing the packs to increase Caribou tag sales. There was a protester guy who'd fly around & scatter the wolves when DFG would try to tranquilize them. A cabby who would pick us up hitch-hiking told us about him & I thought, wow, that is Proactive! Doesn't pay, but it's like Julia Butterfly (who was in her Redwood Tree at the time) or the pepper-spray victims. That was an Inspirational turning point in my life. I feel like I have been ReActivated by ISF. I thank you all! Maybe I'll get the Mattole Free State story down & be able to move on...
=)
Legacy of Luna  The Story of a Tree, a Woman and the Struggle to Save the Redwoods


Akanksha (Annalissa-T) | 1 comments Inspiration it comes to me in the way of my dreams and my dreams they are controlled by some power? I don't know my conscious maybe, maybe not but what I do know is they are controlled. they start with an idea, continue like a novel and the ending is what I write.

So in short my inspiration for any of my stories are my dreams but I cant say the same for the poems I write. Poems they depend on my surroundings and moods and of course the much needed quiet and I say quiet not peace because sometimes I also write when I'm angry.


Vikki (silverstarz) | 2 comments I get my inspiration from different sources. Sometimes it's a song I hear, or a mixture of lyrics from different songs that come together to make a story. I wrote one based on Good Charlotte's "My Bloody Valentine" - remember the first time I heard it and I just wanted to put pen to paper and scribble down an outline for a story.

Sometimes I inspiration from stuff that's happened in my life, or things I hear about other peoples lives. Or something on the news.

Occasionally I've had a dream that's ended up as a story. And sometimes it's just something completely random that crops into my head.


Eliza | 3 comments @Natasha It is admirable that you want to help abused children, the sad thing, though, is that even though you say that you don't know people that have been abused, that is not true. You do, they just have not had the strength and courage to come forward. Trust me, it took me years and years of trying to numb the shame and pain of it with all sorts of craptastic behavior. One of the most helpful things that you can do is be as outspoken as you can against the stigma of abuse. Even the most rational and intelligent of us will spend years (or maybe even a lifetime) thinking they are to blame for being abused. Again, I commend your intentions


Kristen | 7 comments It's not always so easy to put all of that behind you, though. Sometimes, even years later, when you think you've left it all, it still creeps up on you, in things you see or hear. Or in your dreams and nightmares.


Eliza | 3 comments Of course it's not easy. And it's not as much putting it behind you, as it is making peace with it. Something that has already happened can not be changed. What can be changed is what we do afterwards. I have recently learned that and it has made a major change in my life. And when it creeps up on you, look at yourself and see what a beautiful person you are in spite of everything!


message 16: by Natasha (last edited May 16, 2012 09:56AM) (new)

Natasha | 4 comments Eliza wrote: "@Natasha It is admirable that you want to help abused children, the sad thing, though, is that even though you say that you don't know people that have been abused, that is not true. You do, they j..."

I was thinking that myself. It makes me sad I didn't realize. There probably were kids in elementary school I knew who may have been. And in High School. People can hide it, and seeing the signs of abuse isn't always easy which is why it's so important. I actually do know someone briefly in college who was emotionally abused by her father, though he didn't stay long in her life. I only knew her briefly. It makes me sad this happens and it can be so hard to notice but I agree, we must be outspoken against the stigma of abuse. It's awful you had to go through that. I want to get loud about this so we can help as many people as possible know it's not their fault. Thank you, I appreciate your comment.


Astrid Cooper (goodreadsastridcooper) | 48 comments I've been writing stories (usually fantasy/s.f./romance combos) since I was 5 years old. I professionally pubbed in the early 1990s after maybe 20 years of writing and publishing fanzines (s.f./fantasy and Star Trek). My problem is finding the time to write all the stories in my head. I keep a file of 'ideas', but it's growing daily. In my Starlight book (sexy futuristic/human and shifter romance)I took a risk and had a strong undercurrent of what it meant to be "human' and environmentsal issues. Nothing as deep as Kim's wonderful series (of course!), but had some tarot/meditative stuff, as well as interactions with whales, etc. It never did that well because I was told "too much story"... but I had to write it as I did. Inspiration for me? Comes from dreams, from walking in the countryside each day with the dogs, or just simply a name triggers a story, or that magical "what if...?" question. What I do every day is write -- I try for 5,000 words, (sometimes I manage a lot more, other days around 3,000), but the best advice is to write every day (even one page - 250 words) - to get into the habit of writing. I go for morning time to write -- before I get caught up in emails, or other work, because there's always the temptation to say "I'll write when ...." and that "when" time never comes. I hope this is useful? Best wishes, Astrid. (Astrid Cooper).


Eliza | 3 comments Moonlit nights, dreams and people around me inspire me


Natasha | 4 comments Just wanted to thank you all on your amazing posts everyone! I love to read about what inspires all of you to write! :) :) It inspires me even more!


Cassandra | 3 comments What inspires my muse? Certain songs that come on the radio that make me think of a scene, a chat with my grandma about anything and everything and also a step out of reality and just a nice break with a book or hot cup of Englisgh Grey. I typically write at night because I am night-owl, its a family trait.. Lol My problem however is I just right when something inspires me and all of my ideas/stories hardly ever get completed. So that sucks :(


Wendy | 10 comments Innitially my inspiration came from a desperate need to express my emotions and I did so through poetry. Gradually the venting of angst gave way to more whimsical creativity. Only in the last several years have I experimented with short stories and fanfic. I do most of my writing in my head [safe from ever being read!], but a few have made it on to paper. The inspiration is sparked by a dream, personal experience [especially with nature], or that story arc a TV series ignored. I can get quite analytical about the TV relationships and it drives me crazy when I see fantastic potential go unexplored! I know I'm not alone there!
Peace, Hope and Nature


Julia  | 1 comments I am inspired by the book I'm currently reading - A Writer's Notebook by Somerset Maugham. It is a collection the notes he made during his life about the places he visited and people he met, also some random thought. Most interesting for me are the descriptions of people and places. He did pay attention and noticed lots of interesting stuff. This book shows how exciting and interesting our life is, and how much there is for us to discover. Some notes were used in his greatest novels, and it's a real fun to discover those. This book inspires you to travel, meet new people, gain experience and still keep to yourself, not changing your personality, but enriching it. It also inspires to write things down, if not for a book, well, maybe just for the sake of writing. Being excited about something, and then taking a pen and writing it down in your notebook is pure pleasure.


Loya Sinha | 5 comments Inspirations comes to me in so many different ways. Of late everything seems to be inspiring me. ISF inspired me. It pushed me out of my comfort zone in planing the street dog shelter that i have been dreaming of opening. Its turning out to be a reality now. Now I know that "Bark Park" will be operational by the end of this year.


Alyce | 7 comments I loved the vampire series Moonlight but always wished they'd delve more deeply into the "other world" of the modern vamp. I thought there were some promising stories in there. When that series ended, I grudgingly started watching The Vampire Diaries. Early in the first season they killed off a fabulous female character, who had just been introduced (Lexi). I was literally yelling at the TV screen, the way my Dad used to yell at the TV during basketball games, when things weren't going well, for his team. LOL My husband looks over at me in alarm. (Not being a sports fan, I'd never behaved this way, before.)

After listening to me vent for awhile about the stupidity of the writers/directors etc (for wasting a character with so much potential) he thinks for a moment & says "I think you'd better start writing this stuff yourself!"

So...I did. I get frustrated, sometimes, at myself, too, even when I'm the one scripting the story. But mostly that's only when I can't get my ideas to come through in print the way I'd like them to.

Writing fiction is by far the hardest thing I've ever done! (I was an experienced non-fiction editor & sometime writer, already.) It's every bit as hard as I expected it to be, and maybe a little bit harder.

Letting people read what I'd written was really terrifying, at first. It feels like being naked in front of a critical crowd. Not an easy thing! Super intimate, to let others read what you write, because this stuff is coming straight from between your own ears. Not much is more intimate than that!

But it's a lot of fun, too. My characters take on lives of their own, and I fall in love with them. It's interesting to invent characters, and then watch what they do, as you put them into different situations.

Sometimes I never know what one of them is going to say, until I find myself typing the next line in a conversation. (The character has to stay true to his or herself, so the conversations write themselves, in a way. Only certain responses would be something that person would think to say.)

So in that way, it's a bit like having an entire cast of imaginary friends, who you can spend time with anytime you'd like. Usually, that's late at night, when my flock of parrots (I do parrot rescue) has gone to bed for the night. But I often create scenes in my head, first, and try out variations before I actually sit down to write them out.

I'm really enjoying this whole experience! I've written non-fiction all my life, but it's take me until nearly age 50 to try writing a piece of fiction. It's fun! I'm loving it! :)


Astrid Cooper (goodreadsastridcooper) | 48 comments Alyce,I never know what my characters are going to say (or do), either. I might type in something and wonder what it all means, but by the end of the book I understand! When I wrote my first vampire romance in the mid nineties, readers wrote to me to say how much they liked the way my vampires weren't 'displaced humans' - my vamps saw the world through their own eyes, from their own perceptions, and behaved according to their own rules and nature. Of course, my hero was a good guy vamp, but I also have a villain who has no time for any creature because vamps are supreme. It's the moments when scenes, dialogue and/or characters 'take over' that mean so much to me as a writer. And yes, writing fiction isn't easy...I agree that at times it is harder than non-fiction (and much harder to 'edit', too, especially another writer's work). Best wishes, Astrid.


Natasha | 4 comments All of you are so inspiring! Thank you for posting! Writing is amazing!


Heather McCorkle (HeatherMcCorkle) | 68 comments What a wonderful thread. I'm enjoying reading about all of your inspirations. Some of your stories are heartbreaking, others uplifting. I love it!

Everything about life inspires me. From my interactions with people and animals, to movies, books, and music, all of it makes an impression upon me.

Heather McCorkle


Kristen | 7 comments Eliza wrote: "Of course it's not easy. And it's not as much putting it behind you, as it is making peace with it. Something that has already happened can not be changed. What can be changed is what we do afterwa..."

How do you make peace with something like that? And it's not easy seeing beauty in oneself when you can't look past the scars, either physical, mental, or emotional.


Kim Falconer (KimFalconer) | 284 comments Kristen wrote: "Eliza wrote: "Of course it's not easy. And it's not as much putting it behind you, as it is making peace with it. Something that has already happened can not be changed. What can be changed is what..."

Kirsten, that's the question, isn't it? How to make peace. For me it's releasing judgment and seeing everything as energy, neither good nor bad, just as it is. When we take the charge off, its much easier to love.

This isn't the approach we are raised to reach for, but through meditation, immersing in nature, serving others and growing our capacity to love, beginning with Self-love, the world transforms. We transform. No matter what has come before, love shifts us to a new vibration. I know that sounds cliche, but love just does that .. .


Kristen | 7 comments Kim wrote: "Kristen wrote: "Eliza wrote: "Of course it's not easy. And it's not as much putting it behind you, as it is making peace with it. Something that has already happened can not be changed. What can be..."

You'll have to forgive me if I don't believe in the power of love. As for the rest, I have tried it, and it brings some relief, but at the end of the day, I am still left with the memories and the pain.


message 31: by Kim (last edited Jun 14, 2012 04:22PM) (new)

Kim Falconer (KimFalconer) | 284 comments Kristen wrote: "Kim wrote: "Kristen wrote: "Eliza wrote: "Of course it's not easy. And it's not as much putting it behind you, as it is making peace with it. Something that has already happened can not be changed...."

There is an old psyche saying, the only way out is through . . . I think it came from an ancient Sumerian mythology (about Ereshkagal) referring to a 'trip to the underworld'.

At times reaching for a better feeling place, or allowing for love or peace or renewal, just doesn't cut it. At those times the 'better feeling' can be anger, or outrage. Those energy signatures put us in motion and can propel us out of despair or grief. Sometimes a thing is not ready to be let go of until we have experienced every possible aspect of it. The full range of emotions, uncomfortable ones included.

In this I think getting to a place of non-judgment is our greatest ally. But first, sometimes, battle.

These intense experiences can fuel the creative process. In novels, the most lingering memories can appear and somehow the art 'carries' the experience, redeems it in some way, which can be a huge relief.

I find the same with ink, body art, where the image represents so many layers of being. It becomes a totem, a sacred guide that also 'carries' experiences that can not otherwise be expressed.


Kristen | 7 comments You've confused me here, Kim. Would you explain this a little more?


Kim Falconer (KimFalconer) | 284 comments Kristen wrote: "You've confused me here, Kim. Would you explain this a little more?"

Okay, you mean about the 'art' carrying the energy of a memory or idea? Here's an example. When I was in high school, my classmate, a girl my age, came home to find her entire family murdered (Santa Cruz in the 70's). You can imagine this experience haunted me, a lot. I repressed the feelings around that event (nightmare) and that was that, another gremlin in the dungeons of my unconscious. Until . . .

I wrote my first novel. Actually, my first 'published' novel. I wrote several prior but the point is, I start with this idea, what if a girl came home to find her family murdered? It was just a writing exercise, a 500 word piece, but it grew! A year later I realized I had a book, and it was still only the beginning. It's called The Spell of Rosette (Quantum Enchantment, #1) and from it has come five other books and a novella.

More than that, writing the story, and writing it different, (with the outcome I wanted), expiated the tragedy I was repressing. It allowed me to process it, transform it, get over it. Let it go.

Art can do that for the artist. Body art can do that as well. It moves things, allows them to live out and that means they are conscious, no longer buried.

I know you're a writer so I thought the idea of storytelling as release and transformation might be something you would relate to.

Does that make more sense.


Kristen | 7 comments I understand the idea of writing to release the memories. This is what confused me a little.

"There is an old psyche saying, the only way out is through . . . I think it came from an ancient Sumerian mythology (about Ereshkagal) referring to a 'trip to the underworld'.

At times reaching for a better feeling place, or allowing for love or peace or renewal, just doesn't cut it. At those times the 'better feeling' can be anger, or outrage. Those energy signatures put us in motion and can propel us out of despair or grief. Sometimes a thing is not ready to be let go of until we have experienced every possible aspect of it. The full range of emotions, uncomfortable ones included."


Heather McCorkle (HeatherMcCorkle) | 68 comments Kristen wrote: "I understand the idea of writing to release the memories. This is what confused me a little.

"There is an old psyche saying, the only way out is through . . . I think it came from an ancient Sume..."


I love Kim's outlook and inspiration but I understand yours as well. I think it's important to acknowledge all emotions, the bad with the good and work through them. That's the beauty of having an artistic outlet.


message 36: by Kim (last edited Jun 15, 2012 04:04PM) (new)

Kim Falconer (KimFalconer) | 284 comments Kristen wrote: "I understand the idea of writing to release the memories. This is what confused me a little.

"There is an old psyche saying, the only way out is through . . . I think it came from an ancient Sume..."


Oh, I see. What I was thinking was, 'The only way out (of emotional content that is crippling us) is through (it) . . . I think that's a James Hillman quote.

I understand it to mean that we have a range, a whole scale of emotions and feelings, and that when we are at the 'bottom' of the scale there is no getting to 'bliss' save up through the layers of feelings. They have to be felt. This is portrayed metaphorically in various myths and stories where the hero must journey to the underworld, the realm where all these feelings are stored.

Abraham Hicks has a model of this emotional scale with something like despair at the bottom and joy/bliss at the top. Sometimes it's too big a leap to get from where we are with a feeling to where we want to be, so the idea is to take steps. We wouldn't think that rage and anger is a 'step up' towards empowerment, but it beats Fear/Grief/Depression/Despair/Powerlessness because we are moving the energy. Let me find a link to the Abe emotional scale so you can see the model they use.

The Abraham-Hicks Emotional Guidance Scale

I also believe that deep feelings and memories can be released through meditation. It's a wonderful self-healing tool. Do others here meditate daily? I find it brings amazing inspiration, and relief when I'm in the underworld.


Kristen | 7 comments Now I understand it. Thanks, Kim.


Astrid Cooper (goodreadsastridcooper) | 48 comments Emotion fuels the creator. Many authors have deep pain and it emerges in their writing, through their characters and makes for the most intense prose. I'm not belittling anyone's pain or life experiences, I've had so many myself, but I realise they've made me the person I am today and I couldn't write about the things I do without the 'dark times'. For example, I was presenting a workshop about "writing with the 5 senses" and one person came up to me during the break talking about the scene in her book where "the smell of death hung in the air"... was this enough? she asked. I thought about my answer: Does this convey anything to the resader? (Isn't it bland?). I asked her if she had ever smelt death. She looked at me horrified. "No," she replied. Well, I know what it stinks like - alas. In order for her scene to be evocative, to allow the reader to participate in the scene, rather than observe, the 'snell' has to be somehow described, using something 'familiar' (e.g. sharp, musty scent that catches in the back of the throat - this is what death smells like for me) - here, is a scent that triggers a physical response (breath catching in the throat) Life experience provides the answer. Or, you can ask someone with experience to describe the smell, or whatever... It's this emotional connection between reader snd writer - the "emotional impact' that publishers sre looking for. Of course, I don't have death stinking the place up in my books, I prefer the scent of lavender, patchouili or sandalwood, or herbs from the garden, or ... these colour my scenes.

Best wishes,

Astrid.


Allison (allisonbri) | 11 comments I am endlessly inspired by the natural world around me, especially the skyscapes of the desert. I was reminded of a quote from American Beauty: "Sometimes there's so much beauty in world, I feel like I can't take it". I feel that way often and my favorite way to capture a moment in time is to describe it on paper. I may never find a place in a story of all of my descriptions, but at least I have them for myself.
I am also inspired by randomness! I try to write down any and all random things I see as I go through life, it makes for some pretty interesting character ideas.


Astrid Cooper (goodreadsastridcooper) | 48 comments random ideas ... oh, yes! I collect these, too - for characters and story arcs... my file is overflowing! I also realise when it comes time to write, that "random" ideas are a gift and come to me at the right time for that perfect story and character. (or, should I say "purrrrfect" since I am doing a series on cat shifters)...
Best wishes
Astrid.


message 41: by Barnyard (last edited Jun 16, 2012 12:08AM) (new)

Barnyard ISF (BarnyardISF) | 120 comments When I was in Alaska, I decided, I could describe this emotion better in pasted images; while I was in the midst of the beauty. My travel journal turned into a journal of collages. I would have myself make at least one collage, a spread page of the book, per day; dedicating one book per year. I can look back at it and remember when & what was happening. Somebody else can go through them & look at the hundreds of pages & collect whatever information they can gather from it. I thought it might be more user friendly than reading memoirs. It encompassed the global aspects I felt, rather than the isolation of reality. I still wrote some, & was able to fill in the holes after I was distanced from that time, but the combined images allowed a similar release through a more vague technique while I was discovering the world of fantasy.


Kim Falconer (KimFalconer) | 284 comments Barnyard wrote: "When I was in Alaska, I decided, I could describe this emotion better in pasted images; while I was in the midst of the beauty. My travel journal turned into a journal of collages. I would have mys..."

That sounds amazing. What a beautiful way to journal your experiences.


Kim Falconer (KimFalconer) | 284 comments Astrid wrote: "Emotion fuels the creator..."

I agree. It would be an interesting exercise to look at the Abe-Hicks emotional scale and create a character and dynamic for each level. That would definitely shift some feelings!


Mila | 36 comments I am usually inspired by water, for example, when I'm going home and it's raining, or when I'm standing next to the river or lake. I always liked water, just watching it flow makes me calm. Also, music inspires me, doesn't matter if it's slow and sad or fast and energic. And ideas just come to me, I usually write fantasy stories because I've always been reading fantasy, and that genre is close to me. I just let my imagination fly.


Kim Falconer (KimFalconer) | 284 comments Mila wrote: "I am usually inspired by water, for example, when I'm going home and it's raining, or when I'm standing next to the river or lake. I always liked water, just watching it flow makes me calm. Also, m..."

That sounds beautiful, Mila. Thank you for sharing!


Astrid Cooper (goodreadsastridcooper) | 48 comments Kim wrote: "Astrid wrote: "Emotion fuels the creator..."

I agree. It would be an interesting exercise to look at the Abe-Hicks emotional scale and create a character and dynamic for each level. That would def..."


Kim,
Can you elaborate on this, or provide me with links? I am always looking to create angst for my poor heroes and heroines...

Best wuishes
Astrid.


message 47: by Kim (last edited Jun 18, 2012 08:56PM) (new)

Kim Falconer (KimFalconer) | 284 comments Astrid wrote: "Kim wrote: "Astrid wrote: "Emotion fuels the creator..."

I agree. It would be an interesting exercise to look at the Abe-Hicks emotional scale and create a character and dynamic for each level. Th..."


I think I put the link in up there but hang on . . . Okay here is an example of the Abraham-Hicks Emotional Scale. Yes, it's a good resource for character study. There are some others I have in the back of my head. I'll see if I can find them and link as well.


message 48: by Barnyard (last edited Jun 18, 2012 09:15PM) (new)

Barnyard ISF (BarnyardISF) | 120 comments I have set up a web page so I can continue writing with my flashbacks of The Mattole Free State story. It is still a work in progress, of course, but here is the site so far... MattoleFreeState.webs.com

Thank you all!!! You inspired me to start putting this story in Type Print. Thank you thank you thank you. (As Ian would say;) I Love You so Much!!!


Kim Falconer (KimFalconer) | 284 comments Barnyard wrote: "(As Ian would say;) I Love You so Much!!! ."

We love you too! Well done! MWAHS


Mila | 36 comments Kim wrote: "Mila wrote: "I am usually inspired by water, for example, when I'm going home and it's raining, or when I'm standing next to the river or lake. I always liked water, just watching it flow makes me ..."
Thank you so much, Kim! I'm glad to be here :)


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Books mentioned in this topic

Legacy of Luna: The Story of a Tree, a Woman and the Struggle to Save the Redwoods (other topics)
The Spell of Rosette (other topics)

Authors mentioned in this topic

Heather McCorkle (other topics)