Inheritance (The Inheritance Cycle, #4) Inheritance discussion


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The showdown against Galbatorix.

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David This was one of the more disappoint aspects of this book. The fight between Eragon and Galbatorix was anti-climatic and boring.

Galbatorix, who is the most powerful magician and has had a one-hundred year more experience, get's taken out by Eragon making him feel bad? I was expecting much had been more.

He's also a pretty ineffective villain in this series. Why is Galbatorix content to sit in his throne room letting an opposing Rider run rampant even though he’s supposed to be the most powerful thing in the world and could’ve stomped his enemy flat basically any time he wanted?

What did you think of him and the confrontation?


Barely Breathing Banana of the confrontation: AWFUL! Eragon hardly even talked to him and he didnt fight him at all, infact, all that Eragon did do was show him a memory of a bird, i mean REALLY?!?

of him: a man (who is immortal, and king, and owns a dragon the size of the moon, and has an army backing him up, plus a whole race of man eaters, etc.) is defeated by a child farmer who had a few months of training in the least, both villain and hero were cowardly wimps.

of the book: couldve been better.

I dont want to ruin anyone elses idea of the book, but i didnt like it. it was not worth the 4 year wait, or the thousands of pages...


Badgerlord Here's my take on it. Eragon didn't defeat Gal, the really old Eldinora (or something) did. He was just using Eragon as an instrument. And I don't think Eragon just showed him the memory, I thought he channeled every thought, hurt and doubt from Gal's rule straight to Gal's mind. The sheer volume would destroy anyone's mind.

I didn't realy care about Galbatorix not doing much, on the contrary; he was an excellant villian. He was just so far above anyone else, that he didn't seem to do much. Think about it, he unravelled pretty much everything to find the name of the magic language, not even the elves, it's natural speakers, knew it. No one had since the Grey One's wiped themselves out binding it had. Mind, blown. He was a freaking genius.

Anyway quick summary, Eragon's a git. Galbatorix was awesome, but a little twisted. Sorry for ranting.


Stefan I thought that the confrontation was a little cheesy, especially when Galbatorix gets taken out by an easy gut-stab. All Eragon really had to do was get him off his throne and he was a goner. Also, we have to remember that Galbatorix is insane. He's always been so after the death of his dragon. His mind doesn't work like a normal person's, at least. The Murtagh/Eragon duel was the best part, but it kind of went sour and predictable after that. That's how I feel about that


Czczczcz I think there could've been a fight or something at least. The confrontation was too short and Eragon only did a small part in it.


message 6: by Fone (new) - rated it 1 star

Fone Bone the showdown was like some cheap movie's only climax. the villain, galbatorix, "come come, i think you want to defeat me" then the hero, eragon, moving slowly taking time to describe how beautiful galbatorx's throne room is. the villain easily overpowers the hero and says "you have to work for me, go fight your half-brother". finally, lots of attempts to escape the villain's grasp.
then the hero whips out a totally unexpected move and the villian turns to dust. then the freed people are like "yah yah"
christopher writes the book like a classic but it's never going to be one.


Badgerlord Fone wrote: "the showdown was like some cheap movie's only climax. the villain, galbatorix, "come come, i think you want to defeat me" then the hero, eragon, moving slowly taking time to describe how beautiful ..."

Now that you've compared to a movie climax, I realise that is so true! It's like he made it after spending an hour on TV Tropes!


Barely Breathing Banana Fone wrote: "Then the freed people are like 'yah yah' "

You take wisdom, and put it into teenager-talk...XD


Barely Breathing Banana everyone in the story was like a card-board cut-out of Star-Wars (or some other classic)...I'm sorry but it's true...even the 'unpredictable Murtaugh' was far too predictable.


Badgerlord Annabanana wrote: "everyone in the story was like a card-board cut-out of Star-Wars (or some other classic)...I'm sorry but it's true...even the 'unpredictable Murtaugh' was far too predictable."

He was undoubtable the most likable cutout of the lot though.


Barely Breathing Banana thats true...the edges were all straight and he stayed true to his character, except at the end where he suddenly had feelings, even then though, he was better than the rest


message 12: by Weston Glory (new)

Weston Glory David wrote: "This was one of the more disappoint aspects of this book. The fight between Eragon and Galbatorix was anti-climatic and boring.

Galbatorix, who is the most powerful magician and has had a one-hun..."


You remember Glaedr's eldunari when he got furious earlier in the book and it affected everyone around him, including the animals and humans on the other side of the field? That was just one dragon. Eragon didn't just make him feel bad. He dropped the Atlantic ocean of experienced pain, grief and rage from hundreds of dragons on Galbatorix's mind and said "here, hold this."

Galbatorix sat on his throne because he was busy looking for the true name of the ancient language while he sent his underlings like Durza and Murtagh and Thorn out to try and capture Eragon and Saphira. He also didn't want Eragon and Saphira dead, he wanted them alive so no stomping on his enemy. Durza got killed, the first time Murtagh confronted Eragon, Murtagh let him go and the second time, he failed. Galbatorix eventually realized that Eragon would come his way as the entire rebellion was going on the offensive.


Badgerlord Wg wrote: "David wrote: "This was one of the more disappoint aspects of this book. The fight between Eragon and Galbatorix was anti-climatic and boring.

Galbatorix, who is the most powerful magician and has..."


Well worded. Good job, my good sir!


message 14: by David (last edited May 23, 2012 08:21AM) (new) - rated it 1 star

David Wg: No reason is given as to why Galbatorix didn't just march towards the enemy himself and defeat them single handily. As for for finding the True Name of Ancient Language taking up all his time isn't a good reason for why he didn't do that.

He couldn't have taken a break from searching and just taken care a thorn in his side? It would have saved so much time in the long run. He didn't even need to leave his castle. He could have just possessed Murtagh like he did in Brisingr and annihilate them. Why he didn't do it? Probably because of plot convenience. Like I said, there's no good reason given.

Edit: As for how he was defeated was epically lame.Worse, Eragon and his Eldunarai just pulled it out of his ass at the last minute. I'd have appreciate it if there would have been a showdown of magic, sword fighting, and fighting on dragons. None of this happened. Instead Eragon went with no pier planning. He just hoped for the best. I fail to see why Galbatorix couldn't' stop it seeing had the ability to rewrite magic itself.

Common sense would dictate that Galbatorix would spend the energy to capture Eragon and Saphira now by holding them in place for Murtagh, (Or any other forms of magic) then you return to the big project. Eragon's going to need to be dealt with at some point, may as well deal with him now, remove your enemies' only hope, and then pursue the big project without needing to think or have any concern about the war.

Also consider the fact that he took down a entire Order of Dragon Riders with just thirteen. He wasn't even as powerful as he was then as in the now. It just makes sense that he would personally take care of capturing Eragon and Saphira himself seeing as they aren't as powerful or experienced as he is.


Adrian Well, from the previous 3 books Paolini trapped himself by how much "hype" he gave Galbatorix' power. He (accidently or purposely, I dont know) made it that it was impossible to beat Galbatorix conventionally. If he made it so that his power was reeeeeeeally heavily exaggerated when they met, it would've been a s*** revelation. I mean, 4000 pages of reading through the series to find out his power is fabricated? not my style. I'd give the confrontation an average score.

But I think he makes up for it by having Eragon give up everything he loved at the end. Personally, I find that sort of ending refreshing!


message 16: by David (last edited May 22, 2012 03:41PM) (new) - rated it 1 star

David The thing is he has his characters talk about if Galbatorix confronted them then and there they'd be defeated. This says that his power wasn't fabricated. It's probably as you said. The author didn't know how to write it out smartly. He made his villain as as smart or dumb as plot demanded.


message 17: by Weston Glory (last edited May 23, 2012 09:46AM) (new)

Weston Glory In Eldest, it was discussed why Galbatorix didn't just march towards the Varden himself and destroy them and it was a constant concern amongst everyone. Finding the True Name of Ancient Language besides capturing Eragon and Saphira was all Galbatorix truly cared about.

Galbatorix could have taken a break from searching and just taken care of the problem himself, but Galbatorix had grown lax and arrogant. Galbatorix thought by sending Murtagh and Thorn to capture Eragon and Saphira, while he was looking for the True Name of Ancient Language was like killing two birds with one stone. Galbatorix wasn't concerned about the war. He never truly saw Eragon and Saphira as a threat that needed to be dealt with. He knew about almost everything they and the entire resistance were doing. He thought he had the advantage no matter what, he was wrong. Because of his arrogance and being lax, Murtagh was able to undermine his efforts with Nasuada right under his nose. That's how it was possible for Murtagh to let Eragon go the first time. If Murtagh didn't show mercy in that moment, the Varden and the entire resistance still would have been dead already. But he didn't think he had to show himself to take Eragon and Saphira, just send Murtagh and Thorn. He thought once he had the True Name of Ancient Language, it wouldn't matter and it almost didn't. Galbatorix is powerful but he was never above making mistakes or underestimating others.

A showdown of magic, sword fighting, and fighting on dragons would have been impractical. Galbatorix was far too powerful for that. Eragon hoped to catch Galbatorix off guard, that was the best he could do and ultimately he didn't fail. Galbatorix couldn't stop the spell Eragon performed because it wasn't an attack. He couldn't have used the True Name of Ancient Language to stop it either because Eragon didn't form the spell with words. The True Name of Ancient Language is useless against wordless magic. The True Name of Ancient Language cannot re-write magic itself, just spells performed in the ancient language. Eragon beat Galbatorix the same way Galbatorix overthrew the riders, he used his head. It was easily seen that Eragon has the same talent for it as Brom did.


message 18: by David (last edited May 23, 2012 11:04AM) (new) - rated it 1 star

David All you really do is just repeated your previous point and haven’t refuted anything. I hope you don’t keep doing thisad nauseum.

That’s a weak defense for bad story telling. There’s nothing to suggest Galbatorix was lax or arrogant enough to make these mistakes as we never get to see what Galbatorix as character is like. How could this Galbatorix who had taken down an entire order of Dragon Riders? I remind were much more experienced and powerful than Eragon. Characters have described him as a cunning genius. Again I’ll repeat “Common sense would dictate that Galbatorix would spend the energy to capture Eragon and Saphira now by holding them in place for Murtagh, (Or any magic through Murtagh) then you return to the big project. Eragon's going to need to be dealt with at some point, may as well deal with him now, remove your enemies' only hope, and then pursue the big project without needing to think or have any concern about the war.”

You have no evidence that he wasn’t concerned with the war. Otherwise he wouldn’t have bothered sending Murtagh and Thorn to defend Dras Lenona. He wouldn’t have bothered taking Nassuada as a captive. He wouldn’t have bothered organizing any kind of army like he did in Eldest. He wouldn't have bothered with spies infiltrating the Varden. He wouldn't have bothered with assassinations. As for being laxed, I’ll repeat, “He didn't even need to leave his castle. He could have just possessed Murtagh like he did in Brisingr and annihilate them.” It doesn’t sound what he did was all that complicated or involved. Hell, he went to the trouble of possessing Murtagh to talk to Oromis who shouldn't be important in his plans before finishing him off. If he was that laxed as you claim he wouldn't do that.

Murtagh says that he even can’t take off his boots without permission yet Galbatorix doesn’t know that he’s not paying visits with guards posted not two feet outside the door? They don’t give regular reports to their higher officials? Galbatorix who has experience making slaves by use of their true names and being aware of how they could potentially become free would leave anything to chance with how valuable Murtagh and Thorn are?

In the books the characters even talk about how if Galbatorix ever showed up they’d be all goners. You can’t have that and then pull off what Paolini did. This is why Galbatorix fails as an antagonist.

The True Name of the Ancient Language has the ability to define magic as the user sees fit. Wordless Magic is still magic and still functions as magic does. I don’t see any reason why it wouldn’t’ be included. Couldn't Galbatorix just have blocked it with his mass of Eldunary? Then again these books the magic system is confusing, contradicts itself, and makes no sense.

Yeah, because the series that’s all about action suddenly decides that it doesn’t need action for the final showdown. There are countless ways that this fight could have been handled. I can think that a few off the top. Eragon could have tried to remove Galbatorix's Elduanrya but only succeeds in partial. Thus making all those fighting practical and showing us why Galbatorix is a threat. Paolini doesn’t do that. He just has Eragon goes in with no plan on how to defeat Galbatorix. He pulled it out of his ass at the last minute and risked everything on a gamble that he didn’t even know it would work. That's not using your head.

This just shows how much Paolini fails at writing an effective antagonist. He only knew how to treat his villain as the plot depended it.


message 19: by Weston Glory (last edited May 23, 2012 12:07PM) (new)

Weston Glory I don't refute opinions David. I feel everyone is allowed to have their own whether I agree with it or not. And if you don't want me to repeat my points, then say something different. You don't like Paolini, I get it. Don't need another post about what you think of him. Don't care. For me there is plenty to suggest that Galbatorix was arrogant and lax enough to make the mistakes he did. The mistakes he made with Murtagh and Thorn alone are prime examples. I don't give a damn if Galbatorix took down the riders. That doesn't suggest to me that he can't grow arrogant or lax. If anything, it suggests to me that he easily could. You accomplish something like that, it wouldn't be surprising to me, if he thought no one could ever stop him and his own words prove that. Galbatorix underestimated Eragon because he was so much more experienced and powerful than Eragon was. He thought there was no way Eragon could find a way past his defenses, he was wrong. Power and experience can count for nothing if you underestimate your opponent badly enough. Like he said, "You do not seem to understand; you have already lost. Outside, the battle fares badly for your friends. Soon my men will force them to surrender, and this war will arrive at its destined conclusion. Fight if you wish. Deny what is before you if it comforts you. But nothing you do can change your fate, or that of Alagaesia." And before that, "The finest warriors of the Riders could not defeat me, and you are far from their equal. You never had any hope of overthrowing me. None of you did." All that to me suggest his being lax and arrogant, that he wasn't really concerned with the war because he never thought he was going to lose. Even the victories Eragon personally had, Galbatorix considered them nothing. "False victories" as he put it. Again, he was wrong.

Murtagh and Thorn defending Dras Leona? "Take Dras-Leona if you want. It means nothing to
Galbatorix." That's what Murtagh said. He wouldn’t have bothered taking Nasuada as a captive? "... the destruction of the Varden is not the reason I had you abducted." He wouldn’t have bothered organizing any kind of army like he did in Eldest? He wouldn't have bothered with spies infiltrating the Varden? He wouldn't have bothered with assassinations? That's not being concerned to me, that's just being prudent. Why? Because he was never shown to be concerned about Nasuada not being killed or the army losing. He was pissed about not getting Eragon and Saphira. He was pissed about them killing the Ra'zac. But never concerned. There's a difference.


message 20: by David (last edited May 23, 2012 12:23PM) (new) - rated it 1 star

David Opinions are fine. It’s just that you fail to even remotely support yours. Those that are use flimsy logic. Also, please space your walls of text. I’d appreciate it.

You avoid tackling my points head on than actually do any arguing to defeat the point. It’s just bad all arguing. The fact that I have to point this out to you is pathetic. I gave you plenty of examples to contradict your idea of why Galbatorix isn’t lax and is actually concerned with the war. Your problem is that you really don’t’ go far enough. What’s most likely is that it’s just bad writing on Christopher Paolini’s part. He just doesn’t know how to write efficiently.

His arrogance is earned. Everything he says is true. He has more Razac being waiting to be hatched. He can just make a new Shade anytime. Eragon isn’t that powerful as a rider. The victories that Eragon has earned are as he says when they can be undone with time. Just because your arrogance doesn’t suggest he is lazy. The quote you provide doesn’t do a good job of illustrating your points.

The combined forces of the Varden taking the city is a stupid plain that all hinges on Eragon defeating Murtagh, Thorn, Galbatorix, and Shurikan. Who doesn’t even have a game plan on how to tackle the big baddy. Eragon still cannot stand up to Galbatorix even with his deus ex machinma powers. The Varden are placing their bets on the the unlikely side winning with a hero who doesn’t have a plan. So when they hold the city what then? They still have to deal with Galbatorix and Murtagh who have a very good chance of capturing Eragon and Saphira. So if they fail they have to deal with a very powerful rider, a gigantic dragon, and to top it all off another pair. A victory that becomes that much more impossible. Just because Galbatorix thinks they are nothing when they are makes him lax how?

I’ll entertain you on that arrogance makes villains weak idea. You’d think with as arrogance and lax villain as you put, failure would a be great motivation for him to improve and make him determined to stop Eragon. Time and time again we see a failure that Galbatorix doesn’t learn from his big failures. Are you staying he’s that stupid? When all the characters to this point have established that he’s a crazy genius. Which is just dumb from as story perspective.

We do see basic ideas of learning from his failures such as buffing up Murtagh and Thorn. If he does those why doesn’t he learn from the greater failures and how those went wrong? Like taking a personal hand in it by say possessing Murthagh? If he's as laxed as you claimed he wouldn't have possessed Murtagh just to talk with Oromis. We have to assume that’s he’s just that fucking lazy and stupid not to do anything. That isn’t the case as we’ve seen.

Edit: You should care that Galbatorix lead victory against the entire of Dragon Riders. Riders who had more experience, more wisdom, more powerful than Eragon and Saphria couldn't think of a way to defeat Galbatorix when he wasn't as strong as he is in the present. Bad story telling. It implies that he is a major threat.

Edit 2: Your post most recent post is a good example of what I'm trying to get across. You fail to address anything I brought up and continue to post your idea that Galbatorix is arrogation and lax.


message 21: by Weston Glory (last edited May 23, 2012 05:01PM) (new)

Weston Glory The combined forces of the Varden taking the city was a desperate plan that worked. Eragon defeated Murtagh and Galbatorix even when he had the true name of the ancient language because both underestimated him. Arya killed Shurikan. Galbatorix thinking they are nothing only made him negligent in my opinion. It made him think they were incapable of being able to do anything to hurt him. But Eragon found a way past his defenses and the True Name of the Ancient Language. That to me isn't nothing. If Galbatorix had taken them as a threat more seriously, he probably would still be alive.

Am I saying that Galbatorix was stupid? No, I'm saying he was lax and arrogant. He thought there was no way the rebellion could defeat him. He had the eldunarya, he had the true name of the ancient language, he had countless protections around himself. What could they possibly do? That was his thinking and it was flawed. Galbatorix didn't underestimate the order of Dragon Riders. They underestimated him. He underestimated Eragon and Saphira and that was his worst mistake. Like I said, power and experience can count for nothing if you underestimate your opponent badly enough. And finally David, I'll say it again. I don't refute opinions. Everyone is entitled to their opinion. This is a discussion about a fictional series to me, not a personal argument. I exchange my ideas but I don't change them unless I see fit to.


message 22: by Adam (new) - rated it 5 stars

Adam The way I remember reading the confrontation, Galbatorix very clearly had Eragon beat. It was in that moment that by a fluke, Eragon wanted Galbatorix to feel the pain he had caused everyone, just to understand. It was through that fluke of a spell that Galbatorix was set off guard and Eragon and company could beat him. I liked the confrontation for that reason. There was no easy answer for how Eragon could win.


Aaron Honestly the showdown with Galbatorix was pretty disappointing (pretty much any ending that involves the villain talking to the hero for 10 minutes instead of just squashing him like a bug has that effect on me) and I wish Elva had killed him somehow, but it's not that important.

The real problem I had with the ending of Inheritance was that the book ended with 200 pages remaining. I mean, do we really need 200 pages of details about how Alagaesia will be run in the coming years? Can you imagine how something like that would have ruined the ending of the Lord of the Rings? By page 800 I was forcing myself to open the book so I could finally be done with the series I started in 5th grade.


message 24: by David (new) - rated it 1 star

David Wg wrote: "The combined forces of the Varden taking the city was a desperate plan that worked. Eragon defeated Murtagh and Galbatorix even when he had the true name of the ancient language because both undere..."

“And finally David, I'll say it again. I don't refute opinions.”

This is a stupid statement right here. There are things as Basically anything that is argued from politics to sex education is opinions derisive from evidence. Those are argued to death and refuted. This is still the same thing. You can refute opinion if the logic is faulty among many other reasons. Points can be refuted that support an opinion thus undermining the actual opinion in the process. As you fail to engage at any level and continue to repeat your position ad nauseum.

Your “arguing” still doesn’t at the change that the Galbatorix fails as an antagonist despite everything show to us. No good reason was given period. The final confrontation was horrible as it was anti-climactic and not well thought out.


message 25: by Weston Glory (last edited May 24, 2012 10:02AM) (new)

Weston Glory I'm not trying to change how to you see Galbatorix David. I'm not looking to refute how you see him as an antagonist, or Paolini or anything else. I'm just stating my point of view. You're looking for a debate (or maybe something more personal) and I'm not going to give it to you. To me, Galbatorix doesn't fail as an antagonist. I thought he was a very good one because he made readers question whether he was one at all. In my opinion, you had see beneath the surface to see how he was a bad guy. That to me is always an example of great writing.


message 26: by Adam (last edited May 24, 2012 11:21AM) (new) - rated it 5 stars

Adam Wg wrote: "I'm not trying to change how to you see Galbatorix David. I'm not looking to refute how you see him as an antagonist, or Paolini or anything else. I'm just stating my point of view. You're looking ..."

I have to agree, Galbatorix was one of the better antagonists I've read in a long time. Paolini did a great job making me question if maybe the Varden were just a bunch of selfish terrorists. It was a great read.

@Aaron -- that's exactly what I wrote in my review of the book. The final explanations where an utter drag. To be honest, I found my self skimming the last 20 pages because they were just so dull.


message 27: by B.C. (new) - rated it 2 stars

B.C. I am kind of in the boat that believes Paolini is not very original. It seemed like everything that happened, i had an immediate refrence to something else (granted, that might just be me). The final battle reminded me to much of the movie "The Crow." The good guy was being beaten by the bad guy, then he makes the bad guy feel all his pain at once which defeats him (there is a supernatural element to the movie). I was not very happy it.


message 28: by Weston Glory (new)

Weston Glory It wasn't an original way to defeat the bad guy but it fit with the story in my opinion. Brandon, I wasn't thinking the Crow (though that's a great example), I was thinking the Twilight Zone. The episode was called "Deaths-Head Revisited" where this Nazi war criminal returned to the Dachau concentration camp to relive memories of the times he tortured and killed the inmates there. The ghosts of the people he killed forced him to experience all the agonies they suffered at his hands all at the same time driving him insane. Quite similar to the Crow. After Brisingr when Brom was telling Eragon through Saphira's memory that he didn't beat his opponents because he was the strongest but because he used his head. He studied how his enemies fought and used it against him. So it was fitting that Eragon do the same here. Use his head and use the eldunarya against Galbatorix. In a way, this convinced me why he needed to be the leader of the riders.


message 29: by David (new) - rated it 1 star

David WG: I'm not sure if your using the logical fallacy of Appeal to Motive. Why I want to discuss it has no bearing on anything. I'm here to discuss why I think Galbtorix fails as villain and why his showdown was boring, anticlimatic, and not well thought out. That includes discussing why some points just don't work. I'm going to discuss why it's not great writing.

The levels of arrogance that your suggesting that Galbatorix is an admittance that he's not that great of a villian at all. You're saying he's that he's your stereotypical dumb cliche villain. It destroys the creditability of any suspense, drama, or any challenge that the hero must overcome because of the antagonist.

If your villain has the power and there's nothing stopping him. I'm going to call bullshit on it. Especially, if the villain doesn't have to leave his Castle to get what he wants.

He didn't use his head Wg. He went into there with no plan on how to defeat Galbatorix. He risked everything on a gamble that he didn't know would work or not. Eragon never had time to study how Galbatorix as he never showed up. He pulled it out of his ass at the last moment. Besides, Eragon making Galby feel bad didn't come from any study as you suggest.


message 30: by B.C. (new) - rated it 2 stars

B.C. I think Paolini was attempting to keep a shroud of myster around Galbatorix, much like LOTR, where you never see the bad guy, just hear rumors of how powerful he is. That is one of the main things i did not loke about the story. I thought Galbatorix was interesting enough bad guy with an interesting enough motive, but he wasn't developed properly because he didn't show up until the 4th book.

I don't know if anyone watches Avatar: legend of Korra, but the bad guy has similar motives to Galbortix, except he is being developed early and it makes it a lot more interesting.


Barely Breathing Banana Umm...im gonna have to disagree with most of you (mainly cuz i want to see your retorts) but Galbatorix was not, as you all claim him to be, a chiche villain. He was very original because unlike other villains, i enjoyed how he lets people make their own choices just for the satisfaction. For example, with Nasuada, he didn't care if it took years for her to willingly join him, as long as he joined him. Meanwhile, most villains would force others into making them join. This shows that Galbatorix didn't really care how strong Eragon was, so he let him train, because he knew, in the end (had it not been for the Eldunari) Galbatorix would have succeded in capturing Eragon, Saphira, Nasuada and all of the Varden+Surda+the Elves. That make Galbatorix a pretty Brilliant villain cuz hes not crazy like the rest, he sees things differently. (and honestly, if the showdown was unsatisfactory , then blame the hero...Eragon was the uninteresting, chiche character of the story)


message 32: by Weston Glory (new)

Weston Glory Annabanana wrote: "Umm...im gonna have to disagree with most of you (mainly cuz i want to see your retorts) but Galbatorix was not, as you all claim him to be, a chiche villain. He was very original because unlike ot..."

Galbatorix was definitely a smooth talker. Just from how some of the readers responded to Galbatorix let alone the series, I can easily see how he seduced the forsworn into going against the order of the Riders. But I never trust a person who thinks he or she stands above everyone. And hubris is never something you want to be practicing in front of your enemy. I agree, Galbatorix didn't care. To him, Eragon, Nasuada, all of them whether annoyances but not threats. If he felt they were true threats, I think he would have gone out one way or the other and done it himself. Oromis for instance, he saw as a threat. Eragon however, not in the least and he didn't want to kill him and Saphira anyway.


message 33: by David (last edited Jun 12, 2012 09:06AM) (new) - rated it 1 star

David Annabanana wrote: "Umm...im gonna have to disagree with most of you (mainly cuz i want to see your retorts) but Galbatorix was not, as you all claim him to be, a chiche villain. He was very original because unlike ot..."

You do realize that he goes straight to torturing her to try break her after she refuses. It contradicts why you think Galbatorix was an original villain. It would have been more interesting if he convinced her through words alone.

Edit: Besides I'm not arguing if he's cliche. I'm arguing that he wasn't a threatening effective villain.

If he didn't care how strong Eragon got, why didn't he just march on the Varden with Shruikan and deal with the problem straight away? Why didn't he just possess Murtagh and Thorn in Dras-Lenona to capture Eragon and Saphira? This doesn't show a brilliant villain. Just a completely competent or incompetent villain as the plot demands.

Here I'll give an example of how he's written incompetent as he allows Murtagh to change his True Name by loving Nassuada through his visits to her jail cell. Galby has been enslaving people by knowing their True Name for a long time. He knows how True Namescan change such as a person falling in love. Why would he allow Murtagh to visit her and risk the chance of him changing his True Name with how valuable he and Thorn are? I could have let it slid by once or twice as he might not have none it was happening. Though there are guards posted at the front door. Those guards don’t give regular reports to their higher officials of what happens? Then those higher officials wouldn't report that to Galby? There's no believable reason that Galbatorix wouldn't be aware of Murtagh's visits.

Murtagh says that he even can’t take off his boots without Galby's permission yet he allows him to visit Nasussada. I call bullshit! Total incompetency of villain who is described as a genius.

The arrogance that Wg is trying to establish goes into the realm of idiocy. I don't see how not seeing them as threats would lead him to not dealing with them. At level of arrogance, he wouldn't have dealt with Oromis and Glaedr. Besides, I don't see how your coming up with how he saw Oromis as a threat. Oromis couldn't even do magic, is prone to seizes, and has a crippled dragon. He thought he was dead. Galbatorix perceives him as a threat how?

By your own admission Galby would automatically look down upon Oromis, with all the mentioned weaknesses, as something insignificant. He wouldn't have bothered to posses Murtagh and Thorn as he's extremely arrogant and lax villain who couldn't bother to do that with something that actual wants to obtain. Like capturing Saphira. >.>


Danica Galbatorix is a huge presese is all of the books. From the prologe he has been the villan. Honestly. I love the books. ( just look at my username) but Galby wasnt all that i wanted him to be. I expected him to be more curel and demanding. I also expected him to restrian the Eldunari when they first got in the throne room. He was a pretty good villain. But not the best he couldve been. Paolinis writing couldve given him more justice.


message 35: by David (last edited Jun 11, 2012 07:51AM) (new) - rated it 1 star

David I'm going back to a point made that fighting Galbatorix head on would have been impraticial. There is no reason why fighting Galbatorix and Shruikan head on would be impractical. As we have two deus ex machina in this book that even out the playing field. Eragon has the Eldunarya from the Vault of Souls and the Dauthdaert weapon that can cut through wards. The Eldunarya give Eragon the neccessity to fight him. As they say "But now Galbatorix cannot force you to your knees the moment he sees you. We may not be able to best them, but we will be able to hold off his Eldunarí long enough for you and Saphira to do what you must."

As for dragon-back fighting, Shruikan being that size would make him slow. Eragon and Thorn could probably easily out outmaneuver him in aerial combat. The Daurthdaert is a lance which gives Eragon and Saphira range. Which is an advantage over the short reach of swords.

Again for Eragon's plan, he just assumes that Galbatroix doesn't know that magic can be used without words. Why does he assume this? Galbatorix had the same training as he did. Eragon should have concluded that Galbatorix would have covered that base with the Name of the Ancient Language.

Besides, using wordless magic is an extremely dangerous. Eragon has had no experience and is more likely to fail. See what I mean when Eragon risked everything on gamble rather than any planning on his part.


Alana Honestly, I just think Galbatorix was bored. He had amassed all this power and no one could defeat him (mostly because everyone had built up such a grand idea of him that they were afraid to try) and other than seeking out the true name of the ancient language, he had nothing else to give me amusement. I mean, once you've conquered the world, what else is there to engage your mind? He allows Eragon's training to play out and the Varden to fight because he has nothing better to do and he plays with them like a cat would a mouse that has no escape, but sadistically he enjoys tormenting it, watching it try. As far as whether the showdown should have been more involved, I haven't really decided. I think his mind was so depraved that virtually nothing should have effected it, but maybe that's just it; his mind was so depraved that feeling the purity of thought, of anguish, was more emotional intensity than he'd had to face in many years and his mind truly could not function with the weight. Had he been more prepared for this type of "attack" it probably would not have effected him at all, but it never occurred to him and became that one weak moment. Like a fugitive, the detectives chasing him can try again if they make a mistake but if he makes one while they are chasing him down, he loses and they won't give him another chance. Perhaps it's too simple an explanation, but it's one I'm content with as far as this particular story goes.


Elizabeth VERY anti-climatic. When I read that scene I thought 'really,really!" I mean COME ON! I waited that long to read a scene like THAT!!!!


message 38: by David (last edited Jun 28, 2012 06:29PM) (new) - rated it 1 star

David Alana wrote: "Honestly, I just think Galbatorix was bored. He had amassed all this power and no one could defeat him (mostly because everyone had built up such a grand idea of him that they were afraid to try) a..."

I don't see how you came to this conclusion. Nothing is given to support that Galbatorix is bored or this particular scenario is played out. Nothing is given about this in the books.

Elizabeth: How Galbatroix was handled in this series has been nothing but idiotic.


Michaela David wrote: "This was one of the more disappoint aspects of this book. The fight between Eragon and Galbatorix was anti-climatic and boring.

Galbatorix, who is the most powerful magician and has had a one-hun..."


In my opinion, galbatorix was just an egomaniac. he wanted to toy with the hearts and minds of everyone, and chrush them so thoroughly that nothing would stop him.

as to making him feel bad to the point of death, that isn't true. he said "understand." the word worked in such a way that he took in all the pain he had ever inflicted and all the hope that was stripped from those people he let live.


message 40: by David (last edited Jul 03, 2012 08:46AM) (new) - rated it 1 star

David Michaela wrote: "David wrote: "This was one of the more disappoint aspects of this book. The fight between Eragon and Galbatorix was anti-climatic and boring.

Galbatorix, who is the most powerful magician and has..."


There are too many ways that could be done to show that. Most information we have on Galbatorix is second hand. A lot of it is with him being stereotypical embodiment of evil. Which is just silly. It's really hard to say what kind of character he is as we actually see too little of him on the pages. Any point in trying to say he was this or that just is speculative at best. Those motivations, as him being too arrogant or an egomanic, in order to justify why he didn't show up in person himself have to be taken to an extreme. That shows the flaw in poor characterization.Then placed in context with the narrative of the Inheritance Cycle really begins to make no sense.

"Made to understand" or "made to feel bad" are semantics at this point. It still doesn't change that confrontation was anti-climatic and boring.


Barely Breathing Banana everyone is stating flaws about Galbatorix like 'oh, he shoulda caught Saphira, why didnt he?'
well, remember, this guy is old...like really old! yeah sure, hes immortal but still, hes old!
the reason he overpowered oromis was not skill, theyre equal in skill and smarts, it was because he was working through murtaugh (a young man who seems to be quite fit) so:

Galbatorixs skill+Murtaughs fitness=death of Oromis
not
"Galbatorix is strong...so oromis is dead!" it was a combo.

also, shruikan is pretty old too and i doubt an old dragon like him could possibly fly as fast of as agile as saphira, and he even tried sending murtaugh to get saphira, he failed (well...) so there, he coudnt have caught saphira.

Now im not saying that Galbatorix is an awesome and fearful villain who totally lives up to his reputation, but im not saying hes a weak old geyser either. Hes just your average evil and powerful villain that paolini failed to represent and just that.


message 42: by David (last edited Jul 05, 2012 08:46AM) (new) - rated it 1 star

David Aging as an immortal being in the Inheritance Cycle isn't presented very clearly. I always imagined it as that your aging appearance is delayed significantly but still keep strength a young body. This idea doesn't hold for a few reasons. Brom was as old as he was yet clearly was fit and adapt with magic. That's without a dragon. He's nearly as old as Galbatorix. Galbatorix isn't described as some crippled-old man when we finally see him. No, he's described as a slightly older man still in his prime.

Two, your misrepresenting how Oromis and Glaedr were defeated. It was through Galbatorix's magic that he held them in place not strength. Then Murtagh/Galbatorix killed Oromis with a slash from Zar'roc. Besides, it wouldn't matter how old any immortal gets as long as he has the energy to cast magic. Which Galbatorix has in plentiful from the Eldunari. It doesn't explain why Galbatorix didn't possess Murtagh again at Dras-Leona.

Shurikan is a dragon who are magical immortal to begin with. They don't experience aging as other creatures. A century wouldn't be all that much to a creature that can live thousands of years and grow to the size of hills. Shruikan is still very young in dragon years. Let's compare it to Glaedr who is much older than Shruikan yet he's able to hold his own against Thorn in battle.

It's true that Shurikan shouldn't have been as agile as Saphira due to his weight and size. Not due to age. In reality, a creature of that mass couldn't exist let alone fly. I'd given Paloini props if he actually thought of that and incorporated it that Shurikan's mass wouldn't have allowed him to fly.

The "old" idea doesn't really fly. (Pun intended.)

Edit: Actually, that makes me wonder how Galbatorix fed Shruikan? As a dragon of that size would surely destroy the ecology of Alagaësia. Drinking rivers dry and killing herds of animals for a single meal. Either that or would bankrupt the Empire thus destabilize the economy. Why didn't Eragon and Saphira ever think of destroying doing something like burning the land around Uru'baen? It would have starved Shurikan. It shows thought, strategy, and foresight. Naw! That be too much work and creativity for Paolini.


Danica Remember that Eragon and Saphira were at Vroengard until the very last minute. And that Eragon is very young and inexperienced. He is focused on the most efficient way to KILL Galbatorix. Not weaken him by depriving his dragon food. Would've been interesting though...


message 44: by David (last edited Jul 11, 2012 08:02AM) (new) - rated it 1 star

David I think your forgetting that Shruikan is just as much an obstacle as Galbatorix. Galbatorix is a Dragon Rider so why wouldn't you think he wouldn't let loose humongous dragon to breath fire on everybody. Shruikan is an effective weapon in that regard. Starving his dragon is an effective way to deal with Galbatorix. Weakening the dragon by starvation makes it all the more easier to deal with Galbatorix as he won't be able to rely on Shurikan.

I'm not sure about this but I'll throw it out there anyway. Since Galbatorix and Shurikan are mentally bonded. Shurikan suffering would also make Galabatorix suffer as a result. Why I'm reluctant to say this is because there's no consistency in the books. Sometimes Eragon can feel Saphira's pain like in Eldest other times not. It's very shaky at best. Which is bad writing.


message 45: by Weston Glory (new)

Weston Glory Michaela wrote: "David wrote: "This was one of the more disappoint aspects of this book. The fight between Eragon and Galbatorix was anti-climatic and boring.

Galbatorix, who is the most powerful magician and has..."


I agree. Galbatorix had a massive ego. I get it. He got to the top, he defeated very powerful riders far more experienced than himself but he forgot that the same thing could happen to him. He was a young rider that got the drop on an ancient order of riders. Eragon, the new young rider, got the drop on him. He was experienced, he was powerful but so were the riders Galbatorix defeated. You underestimate an opponent badly enough, anything is possible. Vrael had a chance to end Galbatorix but hesitated just long enough for Galbatorix to put Alagaesia in a vise grip for the next century. It seems Galbatorix had forgotten the mistake the riders made with him.


Alana Wg wrote: "Michaela wrote: "David wrote: "This was one of the more disappoint aspects of this book. The fight between Eragon and Galbatorix was anti-climatic and boring.

Galbatorix, who is the most powerful..."


This is more what I was getting at earlier. I meant Galbatorix was bored in the sense that he felt he was so much more powerful than anyone else that he completely underestimated anyone else's power. He allowed them to get closer than they should have, convinced his power was far superior and that they had no chance, then simply toyed with them.

The reason Eragon's last-second scheme worked is that it wasn't just that he made Galbatorix "feel bad" about what he had done; I believe he used the word "understand" in the Ancient Language, which not only replayed all these evil deeds, but allowed all the anguish, anger, heartache, misery and weight of the experience of all who had suffered to rest completely on one being for a brief moment in time. It wasn't so much what Galbatorix had done and that he felt remorse (in fact, I'm quite sure he felt no such thing) but that he had all the weight of all the world's anguish and despair for a few seconds and that is more than any human mind, however bolstered by magic, is capable of handling. After all, some of that anguish came from his own Eldunari, so they could not bolster his defenses as they normally would. Really understanding the depth of years of misery on an entire nation is even more weighty than feeling remorse for your own direct actions. I'm not sure I'm explaining myself well, but that's how I seem to process the "showdown."


Barely Breathing Banana Alana wrote: "Wg wrote: "Michaela wrote: "David wrote: "This was one of the more disappoint aspects of this book. The fight between Eragon and Galbatorix was anti-climatic and boring.

Galbatorix, who is the mo..."


The showdown still sucked. To be honest, I wanna find Paolini and give him a piece of my mind because I dont think anyone should have gone through so much reading for the ending Paolini gave us. And anyway, since when does 'feeling bad' kill someone?
...
if only paolini was a better writer, then we wouldnt have this problem. I really hope hes read this or something similar to this because i would hate for him to write another series and end it the same way!


message 48: by David (last edited Jul 13, 2012 11:02AM) (new) - rated it 1 star

David Wg wrote: "Michaela wrote: "David wrote: "This was one of the more disappoint aspects of this book. The fight between Eragon and Galbatorix was anti-climatic and boring.

Galbatorix, who is the most powerful..."


You still have to take that too an extreme Wg which is bad characterization of being one dimensional and doesn't make sense placed in the narrative of the whole Inheritance Cycle. It might excuse three books of Galbatorix underestimating Eragon yet by book four. He shouldn't be that cocky or arrogant after all the failure given that he's also described as a genius. It doesn't make him automatically an idiot and incompetent either. It doesn't explain why he didn't bother to posses Murtagh and Thorn at Dras-Leanoa. Also doesn't explain why the showdown was lackluster and boring.

Even after delivering two deus ex machina to make Eragon and Saphira an even match: Paolini still couldn't make an interesting fight. I've come up with better examples that don't require the use of deus ex machinma this very thread that show more strategy! It's the same problem that happened at the end of Brisingr with Varaug the shade. There was no fight and it what little of it kept getting interrupted with Glaedr's point of view. Disrupting the whole scene.

The whole way combat is in the Inheritance Cycle set up by Paolini is a problem. How people duel with magic is boring when all they do is try to break the into the opponent's mind. That's not suspenseful at all when the two just stare at each other instead of doing feats of magic! Even the battles with Dragon Riders clashing aren't thought. Why do they use swords? Swords do nothing in aerial combat when two dragons ram into each other. Still even those would have been better than what Paolini did.


message 49: by Weston Glory (new)

Weston Glory Annabanana wrote: "Alana wrote: "Wg wrote: "Michaela wrote: "David wrote: "This was one of the more disappoint aspects of this book. The fight between Eragon and Galbatorix was anti-climatic and boring.

Galbatorix,..."


Since when does 'feeling bad' kill someone? When it's hundreds of dragons putting 100 years of inconsolable rage and anguish in your mind. According to Paolini, Galbatorix killed himself to escape it.


message 50: by Stormmie (new) - added it

Stormmie I thought it was disappionting. I hoped that the eldunarí would lessen G's powers and then it would come down to a sword fight between the two. But it was still good. Because I'm sure CP worked hard on it.


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