Heathens, Pagans and Witches discussion

53 views
Book Chat > Enlightening Books

Comments (showing 1-26 of 26) (26 new)    post a comment »
dateDown arrow    newest »

message 1: by Nell (last edited May 11, 2012 06:45AM) (new)

Nell Grey (nellgrey) | 1632 comments A thread to discuss books that are enlightening or life-changing.

These are the ones we've mentioned so far (on other threads) - do feel free to add your own and your thoughts on all or any.

The Power of Now  A Guide to Spiritual Enlightenment by Eckhart Tolle The Power of Now: A Guide to Spiritual Enlightenment

A New Earth  Awakening to Your Life's Purpose by Eckhart Tolle A New Earth: Awakening to Your Life's PurposeThe Power of Now: A Guide to Spiritual Enlightenment

The Nature of Personal Reality  Specific, Practical Techniques for Solving Everyday Problems and Enriching the Life You Know by Jane Roberts The Nature of Personal Reality: Specific, Practical Techniques for Solving Everyday Problems and Enriching the Life You Know


message 2: by Nell (new)

Nell Grey (nellgrey) | 1632 comments Simply yet beautifully told:

Siddhartha by Hermann HesseSiddhartha


message 3: by Nell (last edited May 13, 2012 10:49AM) (new)

Nell Grey (nellgrey) | 1632 comments I'm about half-way through A New Earth: Awakening to Your Life's Purpose and now finding the repetition useful to reinforce memory.

Still noticing small things to question, but I like the way he backs up statements with a multitude of examples one might not have thought of otherwise. The parenting section felt very true (and useful for grandparents too).

I'd like to lend the book to my grown up children when I'm finished and wish Tolle wouldn't keep quoting and interpreting Jesus' sayings, as my son will probably abandon it at the first mention of anything biblical.

Overall I've very positive feelings about Tolle's message and the accessible way the book's written and glad you recommended it. :)


message 4: by [deleted user] (new)

Yes, I found the Jesus sayings tricky at first (wondered if he was a closet Christian) but he balances it with Zen sayings etc. My husband didn't enjoy the section on the pain body as much, but it rang a bell for me. Glad you have found it interesting. :)


message 5: by [deleted user] (new)

Yes, parent section great. :)


message 6: by Nell (new)

Nell Grey (nellgrey) | 1632 comments Well, I've finished A New Earth: Awakening to Your Life's Purpose, and found it very clear and confirming, in spite of one or two small niggles. Thanks Georgina.

I wanted to see and hear the man himself while reading, but decided to wait, and I'm glad I did, as I was slightly disturbed by this video on YouTube. I don't think (Ha!) I'd like to be quite so (apparently) without ego as Tolle.


message 7: by Nell (new)

Nell Grey (nellgrey) | 1632 comments I've been listening to Seth Speaks on YouTube, although I think it's abridged. Pretty amazing.

There are some videos of Jane Roberts too - she's not at all as I imagined her.


message 8: by [deleted user] (new)

It is amazing stuff! What a lovely couple too. I'll look more closely at them this afternoon. Thanks for the link, Nell. :):)


message 9: by Nell (new)

Nell Grey (nellgrey) | 1632 comments The Nature of Personal Reality: Specific, Practical Techniques for Solving Everyday Problems and Enriching the Life You Know by Jane Roberts came this morning. I've only had time to read the preface, but I really like the way she comes across as honest and genuine - the real thing.


message 10: by [deleted user] (new)

I think she was. She died fairly young, of cancer. She'd been a heavy smoker. I remember there being a passage in one of the books about it. I remember the practicality of Seth's ideas on the damage she'd done to her lungs, as strengthening my regard for these books. It wasn't a moral statement, but rather along the lines of yes, we create our reality, our lives, our physical and mental health etc. We still have physical bodies and we exist in a physical world and the physical act of smoking does damage the body. I need that level of practicality in my favourite enlightening books. For instance if I fell sick with something like cancer I'd seek the advice of doctors and healers. I dislike books that try to negate the importance of the physical existence, in favour of the spiritual. for me it's about combining the two.

I've tried reading a couple of other books that have some similar concepts: A Course of Miracles, and The Disappearance of the Universe. Both books irritated me severely. I couldn't stand the way they were written. I didn't finish either of them and quickly passed them on. TDOTU was particularly cringe worthy (now that's a strong opinion, I know). But the Seth books kick butt:)

This is my review of this book:

"I was introduced to 'The Nature of Personal Reality' at the age of twenty, by my much older, hippy boyfriend. It's true, this book is life changing. Is Seth real? Did Jane Roberts really channel his spirit? Personally I am a believer, yet this book is filled with such refreshing, and life enhancing concepts, that either way the point is moot."


message 11: by Nell (last edited May 29, 2012 12:17AM) (new)

Nell Grey (nellgrey) | 1632 comments I think Jane Roberts also suffered from severe rheumatoid arthritis, which was hereditary and hospitalized her for a long period at the end of her life.

Re. similar concepts - has anyone read The Power Of Positive Thinking? - I thought of it while reading the Jane Roberts/Seth book last night. I believe it was one of the first self-help/enlightening books, and I seem to remember my father talking about it, but I was young then and didn't pay too much attention.

I like the way that Robert Butts notes Jane Roberts' thoughts fairly often - recording her open-mindedness on the nature of Seth in relation to herself.

The famous statement, 'You form your own reality', although seemingly straightforward and uncompromising, is something I'm finding slightly elusive - I think, Yes, true indeed, then it swims away from me like a little silver fish. To what extent, I wonder...? Taken to its limits, it's a mind-exploding idea.


message 12: by Nell (new)

Nell Grey (nellgrey) | 1632 comments The body as 'spaceship' is definitely an enlightening concept :)


message 13: by [deleted user] (new)

It is! I loved it. Made me think twice. He was and is an enlightened soul.


message 14: by Nell (new)

Nell Grey (nellgrey) | 1632 comments I like what Seth/Jane Roberts' has to say about the ego:

"It is the most physically oriented portion of your inner self; but it not, however, apart from your inner self. It sits on the window sill, so to speak, between you and the exterior world. (Voice stronger for emphasis:) It can also look in both directions."

This seems far 'friendlier' than Tolle's view of the ego - the feeling when reading A New Earth was that one should work slowly to banish it altogether.


message 15: by [deleted user] (new)

I agree, it is friendlier. The Seth material runs much deeper too. Although I do think it's good to shed the ego as much as possible, as it gets in the way far too often.


message 16: by Nell (last edited Jun 04, 2012 04:26AM) (new)

Nell Grey (nellgrey) | 1632 comments I've come to the last few chapters of The Nature of Personal Reality: Specific, Practical Techniques for Solving Everyday Problems and Enriching the Life You Know, but I'm finding it difficult not to reject out of hand the statements about choosing one's reality in this life in order to broaden experience missing from other (supposedly simultaneous) lives.

The thought that somehow we 'invite', and are responsible for, catastrophic events that happen to us, even those perpetrated by another person; that people suffering from dreadful illnesses and even retarded and/or disabled children have chosen their restricted and often painful lives, is a bridge too far for me.

And I'm wondering now if Jane Roberts unconsciously used Seth in order to remove herself one step from some of the more disturbing ideas in the book. Robert Butts mentions in the notes that she threw a certain book across the room - a book containing ideas that they'd once totally believed in. He doesn't give the book's title, but the incident is mentioned in the 'Power Point' chapter which made me wonder if it was one of those early books on post-hypnotic suggestion and the power of positive thinking.

The Seth books didn't come from/though a person who knew nothing of concepts and theories that had been around for some time - both Jane and Robert Butts had studied widely. I'm not suggesting that Seth is a deliberate and brilliant invention on Jane's part, just that in writing the book in this way responsibility for the contents is moved away from the author, and statements that are potentially very disturbing to people with personal experience of extreme violence, illness and other traumas are being told in a very authoritative way that the responsibility is theirs.

Anyway, I'm going to have to give Jane and Seth a break for now.


message 17: by Nell (new)

Nell Grey (nellgrey) | 1632 comments I've just spent an hour or more reading the preview (fragmented into decent chunks) of Consciousness Beyond Life: The Science of the Near-Death Experience, written by Pim van Lommel, a doctor, and based on twenty years of scientific research. It was published in 2010, yet parts of it read like The Nature of Personal Reality: Specific, Practical Techniques for Solving Everyday Problems and Enriching the Life You Know.

I'm reading Seth, Dreams and Projections Of Consciousness at the moment, but intend to return to the other Seth book eventually - in the meantime I'll order the NDE book and read it properly :).


message 18: by Nell (new)

Nell Grey (nellgrey) | 1632 comments Thanks Martin - do add them to the group's bookshelf if you feel like it :).

NB: I think A New Earth may already be there though.


message 19: by Nell (new)

Nell Grey (nellgrey) | 1632 comments The dream book has become pretty complex now, with probable/possible realities all set to short-circuit my brain, so I'm going to give this one a rest for a bit too and return to Mother Earth for a while - I need grounding... :)

Row row row your boat gently down the stream...


message 20: by [deleted user] (new)

Grounding is good. :) Yes, life is but a dream...

I'm being cheeky and slipping in The Hunger Games to read, which isn't an enlightening book at all! :D


message 21: by Nell (new)

Nell Grey (nellgrey) | 1632 comments Reading this one at the moment. The author is a cardiologist who structured his research around his patients. I expected the whole book to detail this research and current scientific information re. the brain, but he's increased the scope to include some history, myth etc. I think I'd have preferred to read about more actual cases of NDEs, but perhaps there'll be more later in the book.

Consciousness Beyond Life  The Science of the Near-Death Experience by Pim van Lommel Consciousness Beyond Life: The Science of the Near-Death Experience.


message 22: by [deleted user] (new)

I have this book on my to-read list. It does look very interesting. It's $15 odd dollars for a kindle edition, so I'm holding off for now. I'm very keen to hear what you think of it, when you have finished it, Nell.


message 23: by Nell (new)

Nell Grey (nellgrey) | 1632 comments I'm more than halfway through now. The section dealing with NDEs in history, myth and religion was pretty short, and the text has become fairly scientific, with long chapters detailing what happens in the brain when the heart suddenly stops, what we know about brain function and a primer on quantum physics and consciousness. This last chapter (with a section on The Nonlocal Space of Probability Waves...!) could almost have been written by Jane Roberts/Seth, although apparently these theories have been around for some time, so goodness knows.

There's a sense throughout of the integrity of the author in his quest for the truth, whatever it may be. Nothing is manipulated - statistics gathered in his research are presented and evaluated dispassionately.


message 24: by [deleted user] (new)

It does sound interesting. Will wait for your review.


message 25: by Nell (new)

Nell Grey (nellgrey) | 1632 comments I've finished Consciousness Beyond Life: The Science of the Near-Death Experience. I'm not sure I've time to write a review right now, but I found it very worthwhile. The long central section I mentioned above that dealt with purely scientific knowledge and speculation was difficult at times but ultimately enlightening, and I'm glad I persevered.

Later pages enlarge the scope from NDEs to encompass other out of body experiences and the implications of NDEs, as well as advice for health care professionals and relatives of dying patients and those who've experienced an NDE and recovered.

Anyway, it looks as though this post and my previous one are practically a review, so I'll probably put something together. :) Five stars.


message 26: by Bryn (new)

Bryn Hammond (BrynHammond) | 223 comments Nell wrote: "I've finished Consciousness Beyond Life: The Science of the Near-Death Experience.."

Thanks for this one, Nell, I haven't read on the subject for thirty years but I want to. On the wish-list.


back to top

unread topics | mark unread


Books mentioned in this topic

The Power of Now: A Guide to Spiritual Enlightenment (other topics)
A New Earth: Awakening to Your Life's Purpose (other topics)
The Nature of Personal Reality: Specific, Practical Techniques for Solving Everyday Problems and Enriching the Life You Know (other topics)
Siddhartha (other topics)
The Power of Positive Thinking (other topics)
More...

Authors mentioned in this topic

Jane Roberts (other topics)
Pim van Lommel (other topics)