Glens Falls (NY) Online Book Discussion Group discussion

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Recommend a Book > Favorite Author's Book Recommendations

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message 1: by Ilyn (last edited Dec 31, 2008 11:09AM) (new)

Ilyn Ross (Ilyn_Ross) From the Introduction by Ayn Rand to Ninety-Three by Victor Hugo [The Romantic Manifesto by Ayn Rand (page 153):]

Have you ever wondered what they felt, those first men of the Renaissance, when – emerging from the long nightmare of the Middle Ages, having seen nothing but the deformed monstrosities and gargoyles of medieval arts as the only reflections of man’s soul – they took a new, free, unobstructed look at the world and rediscovered the statues of Greek gods, forgotten under piles of rubble?

If you have, that unrepeatable emotional experience is yours when you rediscover the novels of Victor Hugo.

(updated - deleted the rest)


message 2: by Ilyn (last edited Dec 31, 2008 01:58AM) (new)

Ilyn Ross (Ilyn_Ross) From: the Introduction to Night of January 16th by Ayn Rand

“… This was my first (but not last) encounter with the literary manifestation of the mind-body dichotomy that dominates today’s culture: the split between the “serious” and the “entertaining” – the belief that if a literary work is “serious”, it must bore people to death; and if it is “entertaining”, it must not communicate anything of importance. (Which means that “the good” has to be painful, and that pleasure has to be mindlessly low-grade.)”


message 3: by Joy H., Group Founder (last edited Dec 31, 2008 10:23AM) (new)

Joy H. (JoyofGlensFalls) | 12989 comments Thank you for this topic, Ilyn. I just discovered it. (IMO, Goodreads should notify moderators when there are new topics. I've suggested it and it may be in the works. Maybe they need another nudge.) (g)

Anyway, I'll have to get back to reading this lengthy post when I get time. It's hard keeping up with everything this time of year.

I do prefer less lengthy postings, especially when they are quotes. Most of us have so many books on the back burner that we don't have time to read lengthy quotes, even though we'd like to. We like to choose our own reading material.

Right now I must go change the sheets for my company who will be arriving shortly.

Thanks once again, Ilyn! Your posts are appreciated.


message 4: by Jim (new)

Jim (JimMacLachlan) | 4476 comments Probably my favorite author is Roger Zelazny. According to http://www.fantasticfiction.co.uk/z/r..., he recommends Nightworld, which I agree is a pretty neat book. There's a sequel that just as good, Vampires of Nightworld.


message 5: by Joy H., Group Founder (new)

Joy H. (JoyofGlensFalls) | 12989 comments Thank you, Ilyn, for editing your post so that the quote was shorter. I appreciate it.

I found both of your Ayn Rand quotes to be thought-provoking. Her writings always had that characteristic.


message 6: by Joy H., Group Founder (new)

Joy H. (JoyofGlensFalls) | 12989 comments Jim, your post prompted me to go to Wiki to learn more about Roger Zelazny. Among other things, it says:
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
"Roger Joseph Zelazny (1937-1995) was an American writer of fantasy and science fiction short stories and novels. He won the Nebula award three times and the Hugo award six times..."

"Zelazny portrayed worlds with plausible magic systems, powers, and supernatural beings. ..."

"His science fiction was highly influenced by mythology, poetry, including the ... classics ..."

"His novels and short stories often involved characters from myth, depicted in the modern world."

"He incorporated elements from literary novels of the mainstream into his fiction, and experimented with allusion, lyricism, and mythic imagery."


Above from: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Roger_Ze...
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

Jim, would you say that his novels were complex or difficult to understand?


message 7: by Joy H., Group Founder (new)

Joy H. (JoyofGlensFalls) | 12989 comments Jim - I just realized that Nightworld is a novel by David Bischoff.

(I'm still having trouble recognizing links because they look so much like normal text on my screen. I suppose I should customize my color settings as you once advised me to. Unfortunately, doing that affects my other webpages adversely.)


message 8: by Jackie (last edited Jan 01, 2009 09:39PM) (new)

Jackie (thelastwolf) | 4048 comments Stephen King gave his approval for The Monk and by his review I thought it would be good. It sounded a bit sick and twisted but sometimes I like sick and twisted. However, upon reading it, it was so boring and not really sick or twisted. Granted, it was written in 1796, so maybe it was sick twisted for that time but I found it to be how people are. Maybe it was shocking for the time in which it was written, but King surely didn't read it in the 1700s and he's written enough sick and twisted to know the difference.
I was disappointed in the book on so many levels and annoyed that I wasted my money it.
I shouldn't have trusted him since his work has gone down the toilet years ago.


message 9: by Joy H., Group Founder (new)

Joy H. (JoyofGlensFalls) | 12989 comments Jackie - I wonder why King recommended the book.

I've never read a Stephen King book. I probably never will, although I often wonder about what his books are like.


message 10: by Jim (new)

Jim (JimMacLachlan) | 4476 comments Joy, Zelazny has some fairly straight forward novels, but he often experiments with styles. Sometimes I get too caught up in the immediate story to appreciate the underlying currents. A second or third read might open up another dimension to the book that I only partially got the first time.

This Immortal is a perfect example of what I'm talking about. Mostly, it's SF with a blend of fantasy from Greek mythology. A man makes a heroic journey through a fairly shattered world to save it, but no one is really sure what that will take, if he will & how. Quotes & references from Alfred Lord Tennyson & other poets/classical writers really add to the book, if can catch them. If you don't, it's still a good story, just not as deep, funny or good. I find a lot of humor in it. His hero, Conrad, is fantastic - a true heroic figure with feet of clay & divine aspirations.

I've been reading him for 35 years & I found his books better now because my knowledge is greater. Generally, the SF or Fantasy aspect of the book is very secondary to the characters. He simply uses it to set the stage, one that is often similar to our lives. It's an added spice, not the meat of the book.


message 11: by Jim (new)

Jim (JimMacLachlan) | 4476 comments Zelazny's styles are often unique. Doorways in the Sand is a straight forward mystery-detective novel with a SF element. Each chapter begins in the middle of the action, goes back to the beginning & ends on a cliff hanger. It's really interesting & a lot better story for the odd format.

Today We Choose Faces is told from the perspective of a man who has cloned himself & tried to make the human race better, blocking off 'bad' pieces of his own personality as he lives through the ages guiding our race. A crisis comes up & the 'bad' parts of his memory have to be re-opened to battle this evil. The story is told by his current personality. A very interesting look at the human condition & look at how aspects of ourselves are both good & bad, told in a very 'real' scenario.

A Night in the Lonesome October has 31 chapters, one for each day of the month & is a journey discovering who the players are & what their purpose is. The story is told by a dog.

Roadmarks has 3 time lines that are referenced instead of chapters. They're told chronologically from the POV of the characters in them, which can also be the same as those in other time lines. Good & evil are mixed up until by the end of the book, your moral compass is spinning wildly out of control.


message 12: by Jackie (new)

Jackie (thelastwolf) | 4048 comments Joy,
He probably got paid for it. I was a big fan of his until the 90's; then his style changed drastically. Long winded and often nonsensical. It's sad because he was once an exciting talented author. His early books are great, you have to like horror though. Some of his better novels include:
The Talisman, one of my all time best fantasies, an alternate world very close to our onw and one boy's journey to save both worlds.
The Stand, post apocalyptic, long but very good and exciting. Well defined characters.
Pet Sematary, a horror novel, but one that has to touch everyone who read it. We've all lost someone to death and we've all wished to have them back; this novel explores that in a dark and scary way.
Misery You may have seen the movie but the book is much better, as always. It takes #1Fan to a whole new and frightening level.


Jim,
Zelazny is one of those authors that I kept saying I'd get around to and it took me years to finally read something by him. But once I did, I am hooked by him, I like his ideas and he's not hard to read.


message 13: by Joy H., Group Founder (last edited Feb 25, 2009 03:32AM) (new)

Joy H. (JoyofGlensFalls) | 12989 comments Jim & Jackie - I will have to try Zelazny. He sounds like a man with a great brain and a great imagination. From what I've read about him, it seems that his heroic figures must be referenced to the classics. They say that the Edgar Sawtelle book is related to "Hamlet" in some way. So far, I haven't see that. I'm at the part where the puppies are being born. :)

Jim, thanks for the book descriptions. Very intriguing stuff.

Jackie, as you know, I don't enjoy the horror genre. It gives me nightmares. :) Yes, I saw "Misery". That's the thing... once you get hooked into the suspense of the horror, you can't stop watching, in spite of yourself. I knew a gal who said she loved being frightened by a story. I can't imagine enjoying feeling frightened. I think perhaps that I might be too "high-strung" to endure too much anxiety. "High-strung" is an old-fashioned word, but it fits its purpose here. :)

On the other hand, I LOVED the horror movie, _The Thing_. I was young then and could take it. :)


message 14: by Jackie (new)

Jackie (thelastwolf) | 4048 comments I just watched The Thing a few weeks ago. I love that movie. In the beginning when the dog is running, I was yelling "Run Juneau, Run!" LOL

When I was just a little kid, I would watch horror movies with my dad. It was just me and him, our time, so I naturally got into it. I don't mind being scared by a story or movie because I know it's going to end, but I would never want to be frightened in real life.


message 15: by Joy H., Group Founder (new)

Joy H. (JoyofGlensFalls) | 12989 comments Great that your dad watched TV with you, Jackie. When I was a little kid, there was no TV. LOL

I love watching movies on TV with someone else who is just as interested. Sometimes I do that with my sister. We enjoy making remarks to each other about the movie while we're watching it.

Sometimes book groups will read a book and then watch the movie together via a video, CD, or DVD (or whatever you call it). :) My sister and I did that with Henry James' _Portrait of a Lady_. It was fun.


message 16: by Jackie (new)

Jackie (thelastwolf) | 4048 comments When my son's friend Anthony lived here for the summer, we'd watch movies together. It would take us 3 to 4 hours to watch an hour and a half movie because of all the pausing we'd do. Some was to talk about the movie, some was to make fun of it.


message 17: by Joy H., Group Founder (new)

Joy H. (JoyofGlensFalls) | 12989 comments That's great, Jackie. There's nothing like a good conversation, where all parties are "into it" and everyone is not only interested, but interesting. :)

That's where having common interests helps. When all parties are interested in the same thing, a conversation can go on for hours.

I especially like a conversation around a table during or after a meal.

Quotation:
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
"It is around a table that friends perceive best the warmth of being together."
-from a plaque bought years ago, now hanging in my dining room
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

On the other hand:
=======================================================
"A cynic can chill and dishearten with a single word."
-Ralph Waldo Emerson
=======================================================
I try to impress that upon my family. :)


message 18: by [deleted user] (last edited Jan 25, 2009 07:49PM) (new)

My favorite author is Norah Lofts. When I was living in Suffolk, England I picked up one of her books at the library and really enjoyed it. It was The House at Sunset about an old house down thru the ages and the people who lived in it. It would probably bore most people but I loved it. I didn't realize at the time that it was a trilogy starting out with The Townhouse which I later read. I now try to collect all Norah Lofts books and have 53 but my collecton is not complete. Her books are for the most part out of print so you have to search for them in second hand books stores, on eBay, etc. I just got Esther brand new on Amazon.com before Christmas.
Norah Lofts also had two pen names and I haven't read either of those. One was Peter Curtis which the local librarian told me about. Some of the books she wrote they change the titles and publish them again. I have no idea why this has been done but it has created some confusion.

Jassy

One of my favorite Norah Lofts characters is Jassy and I found out from online friends that a movie was made from this book! I had no idea. But my very favorite book is Afternoon of an Autocrat. If I am upset about something I can read the first 30 or 40 pages of this book and feel much better. (no idea why) Let me know if you read it and what you think.


message 19: by Joy H., Group Founder (new)

Joy H. (JoyofGlensFalls) | 12989 comments Hi Alice,
That's very interesting about _Afternoon of Autocrat_ making you feel better after being upset. I think I'll take a look at that book. (g) I've put it on my BTR list so I won't forget about it.

I'm impressed by your collection of Norah Loft books.
I remember reading them years ago.
My records show that I've read the following books by Loft:

_Madselin_

_Requiem for Idols & You're Best Alone_ (I read only _Requiem for Idols_, not the other.)

_Pargeters An Historical Novel of Seventeenth-Century England_

_Lady Living Alone_

_The Lute Player_


message 20: by [deleted user] (new)

It may be very hard for you to find Afternoon of an Autocrat as its out of print. I have to be very careful with my copy. Two women on my group from England (one move to Australia) tell me that its also called The Devil in Clevely but I am not sure as I have never seen or read that one. I think I got my copy on Alibris which handles lots of second hand books that are in good shape.
So glad you are a Norah Loft fan too. Sometime when you are up to it do join us for a few of our discussions. My little group is Fans of Norah Lofts. We are reading The Haunting of Gad's Hall for February. I prefer to read it around Halloween but a lady who just read it wants to discuss it. Then we are reading The Townhouse in March.
The lady in Australia has a special antique (or repro)..I forget that she keeps her collection in.
I am very excited to meet another NL fan as I have learned so much from others who read her books too.
Alice

Joy H. (of Glens Falls) wrote: "Hi Alice,
That's very interesting about _Afternoon of Autocrat_ making you feel better af..."





message 21: by Joy H., Group Founder (new)

Joy H. (JoyofGlensFalls) | 12989 comments You're right, Alice. I just checked my library system's catalog online and, although there are almost 70 books by Norah Lofts, there is no Afternoon of Autocrat. That's interesting.

I'm sorry to say that I can't remember anything about the Lofts books I read. It was too long ago. So I probably will just take a look at your group's conversations and be a lurker. (g) Thank you for the invitation.

My BTR list is very long, but I'll keep Norah Lofts in mind. I know I'd enjoy reading her again.


message 22: by [deleted user] (new)

Hi Joy, I only vaguely remember most of the plots which is why I can read them again and again. Two of the ladies can really recall everything and they amaze me. I am so glad you are going to join us and will try to send you and invite to make it easier to find as there are so many groups now.
Thanks Jim for introducing me to Joy's group.
Alice

Joy H. (of Glens Falls) wrote: "You're right, Alice. I just checked my library system's catalog online and, although there are almost 70 books by Norah Lofts, there is no [b:Afternoon of Autocrat|689010|Afternoon of Autocrat|Nora..."




message 23: by Joy H., Group Founder (new)

Joy H. (JoyofGlensFalls) | 12989 comments Received your invitation. Will follow up. Thanks, Alice.


message 24: by [deleted user] (new)

Thanks for joining us. Very cold here today being on 9 degrees. Glad you are getting company! have fun,
Alice


message 25: by Joy H., Group Founder (new)

Joy H. (JoyofGlensFalls) | 12989 comments It's 13°F here in Glens Falls, NY at 12:56 PM.
Stay warm there in Colorado, Alice!
At least you get a lot of sunshine in CO.
That's what I heard, anyway. (g) Do you?


message 26: by Joy H., Group Founder (new)

Joy H. (JoyofGlensFalls) | 12989 comments I wish NY had more sunny days. Ed's hobby is weather. He's supposed to be keeping a record of the number of sunny days we have each month here. I'm waiting for his report.


message 27: by [deleted user] (new)

That will be interesting,please let me know. My sister lives in VT and my mother in NH. Right after we moved here to CO I got a skin cancer which had to be cut out. Altho the sunlight lifts my mood too much at high altitude can cause skin cancer. So be glad of the days you have overcast.


message 28: by Joy H., Group Founder (new)

Joy H. (JoyofGlensFalls) | 12989 comments Alice wrote: "Right after we moved here to CO I got a skin cancer..."

Oh, my. I never thought of that disadvantage of living in very sunny areas or places where one would be inclined to be outdoors more often.

OTOH, sunshine is good for Vitamin D, which is needed to process calcium in the body... and therefore important for healthy bones. My doctor had put me on Vitamin D(3) for that purpose. I also take calcium pills along with the Vitamin D (3).

Do you wear clothes to protect you from the sun or do you use a sun-screen on your skin?


message 29: by [deleted user] (last edited Jan 30, 2009 05:22PM) (new)

Yes, I have always worn hats cause I love them. I have many, one is a black wide brim Southern style from Dixie Gun Works, one is from VT in pale green and made there, have a J. Peterman dark fake fur and silver fake fur from Taos. Many more too! My husband also loves hats; we have about 20 hat boxes!! I have always worn sunscreen and hats as I am pale like a vampire and been criticized horribly for it especially when I was younger and it was the fashion to be tan.

Part of it is the intensity of light at high altitude. I also wear very dark glasses to prevent cataracts.

My husband has a very severe Vitamin D deficiency causing him osteopenia so he takes a big dose of D everyday. I just started recently since they have learned its so important to prevent cancer and even heart attack!

I even buy SPF 45 clothing when I can. I also have some calcium with a small amount of D in it. As Bella said in the books and also in movie something along the lines of "my mother was an albino"! I am about that pale and like night time!



message 30: by [deleted user] (new)

Have you read any Jodie Picoult? Our conversation makes me think of Second Glances. I bet she is popular in your area.


message 31: by Becky (new)

Becky (BeckyMurr) Alice wrote: "Have you read any Jodie Picoult? Our conversation makes me think of Second Glances. I bet she is popular in your area."

I have read several of her books & enjoyed them-My Sister's Keeper was great...


message 32: by Joy H., Group Founder (new)

Joy H. (JoyofGlensFalls) | 12989 comments Alice - Yes, you have to be extra careful if you have light skin. It's good that you wear wide brim hats and that you're taking other precautions to shield yourself from the sun.

I have never read Jodi Picoult.
Per Becky's recommendation, I'll put _My Sister's Keeper_ on my TBR list. Couldn't hurt! (g)


message 33: by Susan (NY) (new)

Susan (NY) Alice wrote: "Have you read any Jodie Picoult? Our conversation makes me think of Second Glances. I bet she is popular in your area."

I have read a few of Jodie Picoult's books,
"My Sister's Keeper" and "Plain Truth" have been my favorite so far. I want to read "The Tenth Circle" sometime. My to-read list just keeps getting bigger.
I would also like to read The Chronicles of Narnia series, even though it is a children's classic. I never read them when I was a child. I think I may have missed out on something.


message 34: by Becky (new)

Becky (BeckyMurr) Susan wrote: "Alice wrote: "Have you read any Jodie Picoult? Our conversation makes me think of Second Glances. I bet she is popular in your area."

I have read a few of Jodie Picoult's books,
"My Sister's ..."

The Tenth Circle was good & Vanishing Acts was very good....



message 35: by Joy H., Group Founder (last edited Feb 01, 2009 10:12AM) (new)

Joy H. (JoyofGlensFalls) | 12989 comments Susan wrote: "I would also like to read The Chronicles of Narnia series..."

Susan, you might take a peek at the text at the following webpages:

http://www.amazon.com/gp/reader/00607...
(Click on the forward arrows. The first arrow is at the bottom on the right.)

http://browseinside.harpercollinschil...
(Keep scrolling down.)

I might spend some time reading those samples too.
I'm curious about the writing style of C. S. Lewis when it comes to children's stories,
especially The Chronicles of Narnia.


message 36: by Susan (NY) (new)

Susan (NY) Joy H. (of Glens Falls) wrote: "Susan wrote: "I would also like to read The Chronicles of Narnia series..."

Susan, you might take a peek at the text at the following webpages:

http://www.amazon.com/gp/reader/00607......"


Thanks Joy,
I think I will check out "The Magician's Nephew" next weekend at the library, it's the first in the series. I have to finish "The Giant's House by Elizabeth McCracken first though.


message 37: by Joy H., Group Founder (new)

Joy H. (JoyofGlensFalls) | 12989 comments From Wiki:
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
"The Magician's Nephew is a fantasy novel for children written by C. S. Lewis. It was the sixth book published in his The Chronicles of Narnia series, but is the first in the chronology of the Narnia novels' fictional universe. Thus it is an early example of a prequel and includes many references to the previously published books, especially The Lion, the Witch and the Wardrobe. In more recent republications, the books have been re-ordered with The Magician's Nephew as book one. See The Chronicles of Narnia entry for more information on the ordering of the books in the series."
FROM: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Magi...
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

Nothing is simple anymore!

I LOVED _The Giant's House A Romance_!


message 38: by Susan (NY) (new)

Susan (NY) Joy H. (of Glens Falls) wrote: "From Wiki:
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
"The Magician's Nephew is a fantasy novel for children written by C. S. Lewis. It was the sixth book published in his The Chronic..."


decisions, decisions,
publication order or chronological order, I think I will try the chronological order. Thanks for the info Joy.
I agree "The Giant's House A Romance" is pretty good.


message 39: by Joy H., Group Founder (new)

Joy H. (JoyofGlensFalls) | 12989 comments Susan, I think you've made a good decision, going with the chronological order.

I had to refresh my understanding of the word "prequel".

The dictionary defines "prequel" as "a work (as a novel or a play) whose story precedes that of an earlier work".

I had to think about that a minute. (g)


message 40: by Becky (new)

Becky (BeckyMurr) Becky wrote: "Susan wrote: "Alice wrote: "Have you read any Jodie Picoult? Our conversation makes me think of Second Glances. I bet she is popular in your area."

I have read a few of Jodie Picoult's books,
"M..."



Just found this....

There are plans by New Line Cinema to turn My Sister's Keeper into a feature film, to be released June 26th, 2009. Nick Cassavetes is attached to direct it.[1:][2:] It will star Cameron Diaz as Sara and Alec Baldwin as Campbell.[2:] Dakota and Elle Fanning were originally set to play the sisters but Dakota changed her mind when she found out she would have to shave her head to play the leukemia-suffering character of Kate. Elle dropped out along with her sister, and they were replaced with Sofia Vassilieva and Abigail Breslin.



message 41: by Joy H., Group Founder (last edited Feb 01, 2009 12:49PM) (new)

Joy H. (JoyofGlensFalls) | 12989 comments Becky wrote: "There are plans by New Line Cinema to turn My Sister's Keeper into a feature film..."

Thanks, Becky. We'll have to keep our eye on that movie.


message 42: by Joy H., Group Founder (last edited Feb 01, 2009 01:17PM) (new)

Joy H. (JoyofGlensFalls) | 12989 comments Susan,
I've found a web page which gives a peek at the beginning of _The Magician's Nephew_.
http://www.amazon.com/gp/reader/00662...
Scroll down to the little arrow on the right.

P.S. The following web page gives you a few more pages than the one above:
http://browseinside.harpercollinschil...
PPS-By golly, I think it gives you the entire book!


message 43: by Becky (new)

Becky (BeckyMurr) Alice wrote: "I will certainly go to see it as the plot of that book is certainly incredible and I think she should win a prize for that book. I was just answering a neverending quiz question which came up when ..."

Alice-If I am not mistaken-Larry wrote the screenplay for the movie. Annie Proulx wrote the actual story from which they adapted the screen play...


message 44: by [deleted user] (new)

Thank you Becky as I failed to answer the question yet and so would have gotten the answer wrong. I worked my way up on the Quiz to 147 and have to keep answering questions in order to keep my spot as others are also working to be number 1 and so my score drops down often to around 151. Are you addicted to the Neverending Quiz also?
Thanks again for your tip.


message 45: by Susan (NY) (new)

Susan (NY) Joy H. (of Glens Falls) wrote: "Susan,
I've found a web page which gives a peek at the beginning of _The Magician's Nephew_.
http://www.amazon.com/gp/reader/00662...
Scroll down to the little arrow on ..."


Your right Joy, I think it does give you the entire book. I don't like reading books on the computer though, I want to be able to feel the book and turn the pages. Thanks for taking time and finding the web site for me, it's definitely amazing all the things you can do on the computer.


message 46: by Becky (new)

Becky (BeckyMurr) Alice wrote: "Thank you Becky as I failed to answer the question yet and so would have gotten the answer wrong. I worked my way up on the Quiz to 147 and have to keep answering questions in order to keep my spot..."

Alice LOL I have NO idea what you are talking about!! LOL


message 47: by [deleted user] (new)

The Neverending Quiz! The reply you made to me about who wrote Brokeback Mountain which was a question I had on the Neverending Quiz. I got it right thanks to your reply above!

Thank YOU!


message 48: by Becky (new)

Becky (BeckyMurr) I don't know what the Neverending Quiz is, I thought you were just making a statement.....LOL


message 49: by [deleted user] (new)

Well, I sent you a question from it so you can have fun too. If you don't find it go to the top and click on EXPLORE and then on Trivia and you will be there. Its almost as much fun as doing genealogy! LOL!


message 50: by Joy H., Group Founder (last edited Feb 01, 2009 08:34PM) (new)

Joy H. (JoyofGlensFalls) | 12989 comments Susan wrote: "Your right Joy, I think it does give you the entire book. I don't like reading books on the computer though, I want to be able to feel the book and turn the pages. Thanks for taking time and finding the web site for me..."

Susan, I usually don't like reading books on the computer either.
However, I started reading _The Magician's Nephew_ from the website,
http://browseinside.harpercollinschil...
and I couldn't stop reading!!!

The story draws you in right away! I never thought C.S. Lewis could be so readable. Of course he wrote it for children, but still, it is recommended as adult reading as well, because of the allegory.

Thanks for drawing my attention to _The Magician's Nephew_. I'm so glad you did.


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Glens Falls (NY) Online Book Discussion Group

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Books mentioned in this topic

Nightworld (other topics)
Vampires of Nightworld (other topics)
The Monk (other topics)
This Immortal (other topics)
Doorways in the Sand (other topics)
More...

Authors mentioned in this topic

Roger Zelazny (other topics)
Stephen King (other topics)
Alfred Lord Tennyson (other topics)
Jodi Picoult (other topics)
C.S. Lewis (other topics)