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Moloch | 895 comments I have noticed that the author Wilhelmine of Prussia (1709-1758) (who wrote a book of memoirs) is known with a variety of names in Goodreads:

"Wilhelmine Friederike Sophie"

"Friederike Sophie Wilhelmine" http://www.goodreads.com/author/show/...

"Wilhelmine" http://www.goodreads.com/author/show/...

"Wilhelmine Wilhelmine" http://www.goodreads.com/author/show/...

"Margravine Wilhelmine" http://www.goodreads.com/author/show/...

These are the ones I found with a quick search (there may still be others).

I have edited the first one and changed it into this:

http://www.goodreads.com/author/show/...

For the name, I didn't know what to choose, and also none of them seemed correct or complete, so I've used the title of the Wikipedia page (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wilhelmi...). My question is: is it a correct title for Goodreads policy? If so, I will proceed to merge the others. Thanks


vicki_girl | 2754 comments I would use "Wilhelmine of Prussia", and merge all the variations under that. "Margravine" is a title and the policy is that titles are not included.

Nobility has been harder to deal with since many have no surname (last name). Their title is often the only way to identify them. Therefore, there are cases where the title is used. (See Charles, Prince of Wales.)

In this case though, I think "Wilhelmine of Prussia" is sufficient for identifying her from other people. :)


Moloch | 895 comments Thanks; there are other people known as "Wilhelmine of Prussia" (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wilhelmi...), but they're not authors, so I think in Goodreads "Margravine etc." can be omitted, as you say.

I'll fix it.


Peter (pete_C) | 388 comments vicki_girl wrote: "I would use "Wilhelmine of Prussia", and merge all the variations under that. "Margravine" is a title and the policy is that titles are not included.

Nobility has been harder to deal with since m..."


Actually, Prince Charles does have a surname, Mountbatten-Windsor. See The official website of The British Monarchy -> The Royal Family name.

Does this mean Charles, Prince of Wales should be corrected to "Charles Mountbatten-Windsor", since policy states that titles are not included?


message 5: by rivka, Librarian Moderator (new)

rivka | 22301 comments Mod
No. Look at the caveat in the policy again.


Peter (pete_C) | 388 comments rivka wrote: "No. Look at the caveat in the policy again."

I assume you are referring to the following:
The only exceptions are those where the author is known primarily by a name that includes the honorific:
Example:
Mahatma Ghandi (not Mohandas Karamchand Gandhi)


Makes sense to me; after all, how many people know that the surname of the Prince of Wales is Mountbatten-Windsor? *rhetorical question*


message 7: by rivka, Librarian Moderator (new)

rivka | 22301 comments Mod
That would be the one, yes.


message 8: by ^ (new)

^ | 77 comments Peter wrote: "vicki_girl wrote: "I would use "Wilhelmine of Prussia", and merge all the variations under that. "Margravine" is a title and the policy is that titles are not included.

Nobility has been harder t..."


May I gently observe that the usage "Charles, Prince of Wales" implies that the man in question is dead; which he most definitely is not! The correct and unambiguous usage is "HRH The Prince of Wales"


message 9: by rivka, Librarian Moderator (new)

rivka | 22301 comments Mod
Call us ignorant colonials, but the LoC has "Charles, Prince of Wales".


Peter (pete_C) | 388 comments rivka wrote: "Call us ignorant colonials, but the LoC has "Charles, Prince of Wales"."

LoC probably doesn't want to have to change the listings when he dies.


message 11: by ^ (new)

^ | 77 comments Can't call you 'ignorant colonials' because ignorant you're not and colonials you haven't been for an awful long time now. Besides, you gave such a jolly welcome to the Cambridges recently.

I ought to have checked the British Library before posting! I have now. Their designation is (example):

line 1: "Watercolours / HRH the Prince of Wales
line 2: Charles, Prince of Wales, 1948- "

i.e. clearly indicating that the author was Prince of Wales at the time the book was published. First name and date of birth clarify which Prince Charles in the pantheon of history.

Our monarchy traces its unbroken descent back over a thousand years (from King Cerdic in AD 534), and first names have, surprise, surprise, tended to be reused! Not, I think, that I've ever spotted an HRH The Prince Peter ... yet.

Cheers

^ Sub


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