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TV, Movies and Games > The Legend of Korra




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message 71: by Ulmer Ian (last edited Jul 09, 2012 08:32PM) (new)

Ulmer Ian (eean) | 341 comments If you power a steam engine with fire bending, it's still a steam engine. True even the ancient Hellenistic world had steam engine toys, but it wasn't until the 19th century that they figured out how to do large steam engines. That's what the industrial revolution was all about. It's not easy really to scale steam engines up. However the hard part of building a steam engine isn't the "build a large fire" part!

And remember that episode where they helped the earth benders do a prison break by finding the coal? So fire benders were even using coal, not just not bending their way around.

in Avatar:
water kingdom - pre-industrial
earth kingdom - a proto-industrialized society. They couldn't have made it more clear that the Earth kingdom is modeled after China.
fire kingdom - early industrialized, think Britain 1840


message 70: by P. Aaron (new)

P. Aaron Potter (PAaronPotter) | 585 comments Ian, I wasn't criticizing the believability of Korra's foe. I thought the Equalists' rationale made perfect sense for that world, at that time. What I am criticizing is the story's pacing. I can take a setback or two...but Korra lost every single fight she was in. The original series was destination TV for my whole family, ages 4 through 41, and we'd smile all the way through it. This season, we met, every Friday, to watch the episode...and after every one ended, we'd all stare glumly at the floor for a while, then wander disconsolately away. That's depressing TV, right there.

Fix it, Nickelodeon!


message 69: by Rasnac (last edited Jul 09, 2012 01:16PM) (new)

Rasnac | 336 comments I have to agree with the criticism that Korra's power level was too low, and she is not very talented too. When you think of she already had the ability to bend three elements as a little kid, and she learned from the best teachers in a special school for Avatar for years; I expected her to be much better at it than Season 1 Aang. But if you think of her ability to bend individual elements, she is mediocre at best in three of them(and waterbending is her native banding, she should be much better at it) and totally incapable of one. We neither feel that raw power Aang have even when he was only a beginner at bending(and I'm not referring to "Avatar state"), nor the expertise and techniquual perfection of the final season Aang(and I want to remind you, he was still 12-13 years old in the end and only had brief, sketchy, mostly on-job training from other talented yet amateur teenagers, not the greatest bending teachers of the world in a special school).

I love the new series; I love the Korra character but truth to be told, she is a mediocre avatar. ;)

On the technology discussion: We tend to forget that original series was not steampunk, people in the Avatar world mimicked the effects of steampunk level technology via bending abilities. This makes a very big difference. Trains of Ba Sing Sei were powered by earthbenders, war zeppelins of Fire Nation were powered by firebenders, submarines of Water tribes were powered by waterbenders etc. In reality, without bending, their technology was in basic agricultural society levels, except for a very crude form of steam engine by Fire Nation, which was also powered by firebenders(which is not that big of deal if you think we had steam engines since Antiquity and commercially available since late 1600s, just look it up if you don't believe me :))

Suddenly, in 70+ years they invented and perfected electric generators, telephones, combustion engines, light bulbs etc., not to mention mechas! This is a very very very huge jump. Not like an industrial revolution kinda jump too. İt's like a sudden leap from medieveal era to early 20th century. I always say genre fiction does not have to be realistic, but it has to be convincing. And this kinda shortcuts really kill my suspension of disbelief.


message 68: by Ulmer Ian (last edited Jul 09, 2012 10:19AM) (new)

Ulmer Ian (eean) | 341 comments P. Aaron wrote: "I'm sorry, but I found this season a complete downer.

Other than the super-fast wrap up, Korra was pretty much unsupported, incompetent, and unentertaining.

Consider: though Aang was facing an en..."


Well I'm glad they didn't decide to totally screw up the world again so that Korra could fight against the odds. That would completely destroy the ending of the Last Avatar.

But I think you are underestimating what she was fighting, basically it was an attempted Fascist take over. They weren't just some criminals.

Regarding the technology discussion:
Really Avatar was already steampunk and Legend of Korra is dieselpunk. And since dieselpunk is sort of 30s-ish, a Fascist takeover was quite good for the genre.

It's one thing I like about how the magic works in this world. Instead of repressing technology and progress into a medieval state for thousands of years, like magic often conveniently does in fantasy (I blame Tolkien for this trope), in Korra it actually aides and inspires science and technology.


message 67: by Thomas (new)

Thomas (Velverin) | 42 comments http://artgerm.deviantart.com/gallery...

an amazing Artwork by Stanley Lau aka `Artgerm


message 66: by P. Aaron (new)

P. Aaron Potter (PAaronPotter) | 585 comments I'm sorry, but I found this season a complete downer.

Other than the super-fast wrap up, Korra was pretty much unsupported, incompetent, and unentertaining.

Consider: though Aang was facing an entrenched enemy, without support, he came away victorious from most of his engagements with them. Korra has the backing of a city full of benders, and her enemy is a criminal who can't even buy supplies openly. And she and her allies lost. Every. Single. Time.

I thought the formation of her little team, with the car and all, might signal a change of direction. Nope. The team was broken up after winning a single fight. Half an episode. And then the bad guys BEAT KORRA UP AGAIN!!!

By episode ten, I just got sick of it.


message 65: by Vicky (new)

Vicky (vnorthw) | 52 comments Originally it was green lit as a miniseries follow-up to The Last Airbender, which partially explains why they wrapped it up so well.

But last year at Comic-Con they announced 14 additional episodes (Book 2), so I don't see why they couldn't have edited the last five minutes of the last episode to leave it on a bit of a cliffhanger. /shrug

For anyone interested, starting on Monday (7/9) nick is reairing the episodes with commentary from the creators.


message 64: by Hai (last edited Jul 07, 2012 11:01AM) (new)

Hai (Angelslayer) Hmm. I actually just had a thought. what if this ending seems lacking because it's not the ending they were planning on having? Everything was wrapped up in a neat little package so they could end the series.

I remember a show called Dollhouse, which only ran for 2 seasons. in the middle of the second season, they got word that there wouldn't be a 3rd season, so with that in mind, they wrote the rest of the season to wrap up any loose ends to end the show. as to not leave the fans hanging.

what if this is the same situation. they were planning on stretching this out over a couple seasons, but in the end, they got the call that this was going to be it. so the last few episodes capped off every plot line, killed off the main bad guy, returned the world right back to where it's suppose to be.

of course, if there's a season 2 coming, I'll feel like a complete idiot. but until that day comes.....


message 63: by Usako (new)

Usako (bbmeltdown) | 49 comments I originally thought there was going to be a cliffhanger and like many others who commented on this thread thought we'd see the second season with Korra learning her spiritual side. But NOW knowing the production team intended for the first season to be neatly wrapped together by a couple of episodes, I think it was nicely done and kept my suspense. I WISH the story was dragged out a tad more b/c it would be cool but who knows what to expect later on.

I cannot wait for the second season to see what else Korra does.


message 62: by Rasnac (new)

Rasnac | 336 comments Sean wrote: "Oh man.... I need to watch the rest of this..... On episode 4. But sold my xbox. Anyone know where i can see it online in one shot?"

http://www.1channel.ch/watch-2732358-...


message 61: by Sean (new)

Sean Burke (spb273) | 71 comments Oh man.... I need to watch the rest of this..... On episode 4. But sold my xbox. Anyone know where i can see it online in one shot?


message 60: by Rasnac (new)

Rasnac | 336 comments There will be another season of Korra; but after that I would like to see a new, or even better, an old avatar, before the ones(Kyoshi,Rouku, female airbender and the surfer dude) we know. It would be interesting to see ancient times of the four nations.


message 59: by Sky (new)

Sky Corbelli | 304 comments Nick wrote: "any ideas on where the show will go from here?"

Straight to the next avatar. This time, I'm thinking 50's noir detective type setting... my money's on Rohan as the hardboiled mentor figure, unless they want to pull attention away from Aang's family for some reason.


message 58: by Nick (new)

Nick (bookwyrm5000) | 25 comments any ideas on where the show will go from here?


message 57: by Hai (last edited Jun 30, 2012 03:26PM) (new)

Hai (Angelslayer) also, the avatar's Soul bending (as I call it) is different from Amon's technique, which is just a more advanced form of chi blocking. It wasn't so much that Korra returned bending ability to chief Bei Fong, so much as she unblocked it.


message 56: by Hai (new)

Hai (Angelslayer) Rasnac wrote: "A technique which is older than bending itself and older than avatars(according to the lion turtle in TLA's finale)is commonplace now. Turtle als said one's heart must be pure to be able to perform it, so I guess psychotic terrorist Amon is as pure hearted as Aang :("

I think you are reading the Lion Turtle's mention of the past out of context.

"In the era before the avatar, we bent not the elements, but the energy within ourselves."

I think this refers to your chi, or chakra (not totally sure which it is) I would imagine that this would later evolve into bending of the elements. I don't think the Lion Turtle meant that people freely bent other people's energy in the past, but was bestowing Aang with the ability to bend inner energy (which controls your ability to bend elements), thus making this a new technique, which removes bending ability.

that's just my take on it, though.


message 55: by [deleted user] (new)

Rasnac, (view spoiler)

Add to that the difference in positioning between Amons bending ability removal and the Avatars Energy Bending. Amon goes for the brain only(hand to forehead). The Avatar goes for the mind and heart(hand to forehead, other hand to chest).

Seems pretty clear it isn't Energy Bending being used by Amon at all.


message 54: by Rasnac (new)

Rasnac | 336 comments Correct me if I'm wrong but I don't remember hearing any lines in the season finale that clearly explains that Amon did not use energy bending. And I deduce Aang wouldn't need to use energy bening on Koora to reverse this process if Amon did not use energy bending in the first place.

It's the first time I ever heard about "The Promise", thank you for letting me know. I'll read it as soon as possible. :)


message 53: by Vicky (new)

Vicky (vnorthw) | 52 comments 1- It's been 70 years since the end of The Last Avatar.

It is a bit of a stretch, but I don't think it's too terribly unbelievable. Keep in mind that The Fire Nation was already undergoing their Industrial Revolution during The Last Avatar. They were using steam-powered trains (Sokka & Aang fight Combustion Man on a train), they had war balloons, a hydraulic metal drill, and armored tanks. Pulling the other nations in only enabled them to build and invent at a faster pace.

I'm fairly certain that Republic City was a Fire Nation Colony prior to the city being founded - so it's not as though they built the entire city from the ground up. This picture shows the difference in the NYC skyline through the ages, there's a big difference in the 56 years between 1876 and 1932, so it's definitely not out of the question.

2- I don't think it's so much that Aang was more powerful, but that he was more in touch with his powers. Korra is more physical than Aang and more reckless in battle. She's convinced that throwing a few hard punches is going to win, when that's not all it takes.

Also, what Hai said about the anti-benders being specifically trained to counter benders is a strong point too.

3- I'm not sure what you mean by energy bending being overused? Aang used it to (view spoiler)

Amon was not energy bending, he was using blood bending. I don't remember the direct quote, but when Tarrlok is telling Korra about Amon's background he says something about recognizing the blood bending grip of (view spoiler).

4- The four nations did come together under the United Republic of Nations, of which Republic City is the capital. That's why representatives of all the nations sit on the council.

Avatar: The Last Airbender: The Promise Part 1 fills in some of the gaps between TLA and LoK. Part 2 just came out, but Part 3 won't be out until September.


message 52: by [deleted user] (new)

1- The Fire nation, in the original series, had technology none of the other nations had or had ever seen. Going from that to the current Republic City tech isn't that far of a stretch.

2- Yeah, Korra does seem less powerful than Aang so far. But she was a natural with her Earth, Fire and Water bending as a child. Maybe her masters weren't as good as the ones Aang had? I dunno.

3- Amon used bloodbending to sever a persons bending ability, not energy bending.


message 51: by Rasnac (new)

Rasnac | 336 comments 1- Actually I doubtt that it had been 150 years between Aang and Korra. Aang's son is only a middle-aged man and Katara is still alive. I think it is less than hundred years which is a very short time to have an industrial revoultion and to build a brand new city. Especially if you think Aang slept in ice for 100 years in the original series and nothing changed during those years technology-wise.

2- You have point about antibenders but they are basically chi blockers with electrical gloves. Aang did fight against chi blockers and against lightining benders. Even if you don't count that, generally as a bender Korra's power level is way lower than 12 year old un-educated Aang. Even other benders are stronger than her in their respective bending skills.

3-I agree with you completely on that subject. Especially energy bending is way overused. ıt is not even a method known to any other avatars before Aang, let alone simple benders. A mythological lion-turtle gave him this ability; and even after that it was incredibly hard for Aang to perform it. How could Amon ever learn it? For a long time I hoped they would explain that it was not real energybending and Amon was just performing a trick with chi-blocking or blood bending to simulate its effects. But unfortunately they did not. A technique which is older than bending itself and older than avatars(according to the lion turtle in TLA's finale)is commonplace now. Turtle als said one's heart must be pure to be able to perform it, so I guess psychotic terrorist Amon is as pure hearted as Aang :(

But of course, non of that will stop me from watching the series. I think it will get much better in the second season. I hope to see what happened to four nations; did they come togther or still exist separetely?


message 50: by Hai (new)

Hai (Angelslayer) Rasnac: "I loved the new(Korra) series just as I loved the original(Aang)series. Yet there are some issues that bug me:

1-How come soicety made the leap from medieveal to steampunk in such a short period of time? As I can see they still use bending in place of technology (power station is composed of lightining throwing firebenders) yet telephones and combustion engines."


Well. since the end of the previous series, to this one, it's been roughly 150 years. think about how far we, in the real world, advanced in the same amount of time. the year would have been 1862. The start of the civil war (which, ironically kind of happens in the second series.) not to mention they have bending to work with.

Rasnac: "2-How come 12 years old poorly trained Aang was much much stronger than the 16 year old Korra who spent most of her life under tutelage of best bending teachers in the world? Seriously, even the first season Aang could wipe the floor with those anti-benders."

I don't know about that. These anti-benders are just that. They are specifically trained to counter benders. Where as Aang just had to fend off fire-benders, who hadn't seen an air-bender in a 100 years. none of them would have ever faced a real air-bender.

Rasnac: "And also I think bloodbending and energy bending, two rarest of bending abilities in the world in the original series, were overused as plot devices in this one. Other than that, I think it is an excellent series. I will certainly keep watching as long as they keep making new episodes. :)"

I agree with you here. I mean lightning-bending was suppose to be an expression of pure emotionless disciple. and here they have it being used to power generators. seriously?

The blood-bending I get, it wasn't really a rare ability, it was more of a taboo to do it. any water bender could do it if they had the will to do it. If I recall right, Katara used it on the hag before she was taught to do it, so all it takes is the will to reach inside someone else and control their blood.

Metal-bending was another one I thought was over used. I get that Toph was able to develop it because of her blindness (she could sense the elements inside the metal, and therefore bend them) and I understand that this is theoretically teachable to others, but I mean, why so many? like all earth benders have to do is get a lesson at the local Y.


message 49: by Vicky (new)

Vicky (vnorthw) | 52 comments I really liked how the characters from The Last Airbender tied into Legend of Korra.

Republic City was founded by Aang with the help of his team avatar - so it was more about them being an integral part of why Republic City is what it is, rather than trying to fit them into the series because they could.


message 48: by Rasnac (last edited Jun 28, 2012 04:08AM) (new)

Rasnac | 336 comments I loved the new(Korra) series just as I loved the original(Aang)series. Yet there are some issues that bug me:

1-How come soicety made the leap from medieveal to steampunk in such a short period of time? As I can see they still use bending in place of technology (power station is composed of lightining throwing firebenders) yet telephones and combustion engines.

2-How come 12 years old poorly trained Aang was much much stronger than the 16 year old Korra who spent most of her life under tutelage of best bending teachers in the world? Seriously, even the first season Aang could wipe the floor with those anti-benders.

And also I think bloodbending and energy bending, two rarest of bending abilities in the world in the original series, were overused as plot devices in this one. Other than that, I think it is an excellent series. I will certainly keep watching as long as they keep making new episodes. :)


message 47: by xenphilos (new)

xenphilos Sky wrote: "It was still enjoyable, even if the last two episodes felt rushed and contrived. I would say that its biggest downfall was not being as grand as the original series. "

Yeah, I also thought it was too clean an ending. When the finale was teased with Korra getting her bending taken away, I really thought she'd spend the second season learning to live and fight as a non-bender (and getting to know the regular people supporting Amon) and also learning the spiritual side of bending. Eventually she'd learn energy-bending to heal herself and the others who got their bending taken away.

Oh, well.


message 46: by Kevin (new)

Kevin Xu (kxu65) | 1075 comments I just wished there were more of the past.


message 45: by Sky (new)

Sky Corbelli | 304 comments Thomas wrote: "I only have seen the first two episodes so far, and I must say I am more interested in it than I was/am in Avatar."

The beginning of Korra was truly ripe with possibilities, probably because it came off of such an epic series. It captured the imagination and led us off into flights of fancy and hopeful dreaming about what it would be doing next... which is probably why I was so disappointed in the ending.

It was still enjoyable, even if the last two episodes felt rushed and contrived. I would say that its biggest downfall was not being as grand as the original series.

I could see this entire story being a footnote in the history of the world, "And there was avatar Korra, who helped end a revolution," in the same way that avatar Roku will be remembered as the guy who screwed up, avatar Kyoshi as the one who got rid of some tyrant, and the avatar before her as the guy who... surfed, or something (I'm aware that Koh was involved, but I'm trying not to be bitter).


message 44: by Hai (new)

Hai (Angelslayer) really? i thought the first series was more compelling than this second one.


message 43: by Thomas (new)

Thomas (Velverin) | 42 comments I only have seen the first two episodes so far, and I must say I am more interested in it than I was/am in Avatar.


message 42: by Hai (new)

Hai (Angelslayer) I too would have liked to see (view spoiler)

One thing I didn't like was (view spoiler)

Also, back to the martial arts styles. they didn't really adhere to that, so I'm Very Disappoint, Son.


message 41: by Sky (new)

Sky Corbelli | 304 comments Vicky wrote: "I was pretty disappointed in the final few moments of the last episode."

My wife and I felt the same way. Almost exactly, in fact, in terms of what would have been nice to see next.

The series basically didn't change the world in any appreciable way. Virtually all of the damage was undone, and the one thing that I was really hoping for - some answers on the origin of the avatar - was tidily sidestepped, despite the potential that the story was practically dripping with.

Ah well, I'll just have to hope they get ambitious later.


message 40: by Vicky (new)

Vicky (vnorthw) | 52 comments I was pretty disappointed in the final few moments of the last episode. I thought everything was too nicely wrapped up with a shiny bow.

Part of the draw of season finales, for me, is that cliffhanger ending that you have to wait months to see how it concludes - Korra didn't have that.

A friend of mine mentioned that it was originally green-lit as a mini-series, which explains why the season wraps up so well - but couldn't they change the last five minutes once the second season got green lit?

I thought it would have been fun to have a second season where Korra (view spoiler)


message 39: by Usako (new)

Usako (bbmeltdown) | 49 comments (view spoiler)


message 38: by Sky (new)

Sky Corbelli | 304 comments So, I watched the season finale of The Legend of Korra and I was... underwhelmed.

May as well wrap this in a spoiler tag, just to be safe...
(view spoiler)

Sigh... well, the series was still a fun ride and I enjoyed the setting immensely. Basically, my problems all stem from the lack of consequences. I get that it's a kid's show, but it was the sense of purpose and change that made Avatar: The Last Airbender amazing. But I guess they can't all be home runs.


message 37: by Hai (new)

Hai (Angelslayer) Sky wrote: "Personally, I'm holding out hope that Amon is [spoilers removed]"

Hot diggity (view spoiler)


message 36: by Sky (new)

Sky Corbelli | 304 comments Personally, I'm holding out hope that Amon is (view spoiler)


message 35: by [deleted user] (new)

Yeah, I know. Far fetched.

(view spoiler)


message 34: by Hai (new)

Hai (Angelslayer) Ala wrote: "So, Amon... [spoilers removed]"
hmmm intriguing, (view spoiler)


message 33: by [deleted user] (new)

So, Amon... (view spoiler)


message 32: by Hai (new)

Hai (Angelslayer) i also enjoyed the 3rd episode.

(view spoiler)

it's good to see the series taking a more serious turn now. hopefully it'll have some more memorable moments that stick with you like the last series.

a few of those that come to mind are...


(view spoiler)
(view spoiler)
(view spoiler)
(view spoiler)


message 31: by Robert (new)

Robert Stubbs | 23 comments I may or may not be humming a batman theme in my head 'for no particular reason' after watching episode 3.


message 30: by Agatha (new)

Agatha (agathab) | 130 comments Robert wrote: "Again none of this felt forced and flowed organically."

Which was the major reason why the first series was as good as it was and I'm glad they're continuing with the same style and rhythm.

I really enjoyed the third episode; the conflict introduced is really intriguing and I'm eager to see how they deal with it. Looks like Legend of Korra will be another one to recommend to my younger cousins and the library rats.

Also, I'm terribly enjoying the byplay between the two brothers and Korra. Nice dynamic.


message 29: by Robert (new)

Robert Stubbs | 23 comments I have enjoyed all three episodes so far. The first episode explored Korra and where she came from and what she thinks along with linking it back with the previous series. It also showed some of the areas of conflict in glimpses.

The second episode set up her training along with her relationship with her air bending master. Also it setup the introduction of additional cast members in a way that was interesting and flowed organically.

The third episode set up exploration of the additional cast members back stories and explored more in depth those glimpses of areas of conflict. Again none of this felt forced and flowed organically.


message 28: by John (new)

John Wiswell | 86 comments The first two episodes play it very loose. There are no great stakes, no overwhelming cause beyond Korra wanting to learn something she's bad at, and there was more sports than combat. I didn't mind it since the animation and voice acting were so good, and I usually don't need a hard plot - but dang, I felt like it was missing after the original Avatar opened with the Fire Nation pursuing them.

The third episode is definitely the most tantalizing so far. Having "equality" be the ideal that drives the antagonists is very unusual and could lead to some interesting stuff, as will their anti-bending power. Very happy with how the show is shaping up, and just as happy to have this crew working on television Fantasy again.


message 27: by Marz (new)

Marz | 39 comments I knew this was coming on, but kept forgetting to watch it. Yesterday I caught up on all the Korra. W/o spoiling anything, I agree with William that the third episode really gives a sense of what the rest of the series will be about. Korra didn't strike me the way Last Airbender did in its first episode, but it definately started to hit me in the later episodes, and I can definately see the potential. Also, I like the steampunk feel. I wish they would emphasize that a bit more.


message 26: by William (new)

William (UUSchwartz) | 26 comments The third episode airs this weekend and develops a bit more of the world and the challenges Korra is facing. Can't say more without spoilers. Really looking forward to see where this goes.


message 25: by Doug (new)

Doug S. (dougoftheabaci) | 248 comments Hai wrote: "well, i should reiterate, the cast and crew weren't the only thing that screwed up the movie. certainly not the biggest reason."

Oh, definitely. I think M. Night was the biggest problem with that film and that had they actually had a good director something amazing could have come of it.


message 24: by Hai (new)

Hai (Angelslayer) Doug wrote: "Oh, there were so many more problems than that. So many. I could go on a diatribe about it but suffice it to say there were enough issues with that film that, if nothing else, the actors, writer, d..."

well, i should reiterate, the cast and crew weren't the only thing that screwed up the movie. certainly not the biggest reason.


message 23: by Doug (last edited Apr 20, 2012 03:42PM) (new)

Doug S. (dougoftheabaci) | 248 comments Oh, there were so many more problems than that. So many. I could go on a diatribe about it but suffice it to say there were enough issues with that film that, if nothing else, the actors, writer, director, producers and department heads should all be removed from the project.

There is, quite literally, no part of that film I find redeeming. They found every detail they could and got it wrong. And not just, "Well, in your opinion..." wrong but "How did you screw *that* up!?" sort of wrong.

Think about it this way: Throughout that entire process did no one stand up and say, "We're doing this wrong." so everyone who's responsibility it is to have done so should be removed.


message 22: by Agatha (new)

Agatha (agathab) | 130 comments Oh, I'm definitely going to have to look this one up. I had no idea they were doing something like this.

I'm a huge fan of Avatar. I actually watched the movie first and I thought it was bad but somewhat enjoyable, on that 'so bad it's good' level. But people kept telling me about the show and how awesome it was and so one day I caught the second episode on TV and almost instantly fell in love with it.

It's the kind of show I wish all kids would watch. It's educational without being preachy, it's incredibly touching at times and it deals with some difficult, adult themes in ways that are accessible to children. It's also fun and entertaining and has some of the best developed characters I've ever seen in a work aimed primarily at children.


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Avatar: The Last Airbender: The Promise, Part 1 (other topics)