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The Eye of the World (Wheel of Time, #1)
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The Wheel of Time > EYE of the WORLD - Prologue to 12th Chapter ***SPOILERS***

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message 1: by Jon, What's a WoT? (last edited Mar 28, 2012 01:26PM) (new) - rated it 5 stars

Jon (jonmoss) | 693 comments Mod
Thoughts on the Prologue of The Eye of the World? Did it grab you? Intrigue you?

When I re-read this Prologue (probably for the 20th time), I made note of a couple of references I had forgotten. I don't remember it being so short, though. Compared to some of the later volumes' Prologues, this one ended way before I wanted it to.

Chapters 1 through 12 introduce us to the key people at the heart of this series.

I am especially enjoying my revisit to the Two Rivers and meeting Rand, Mat, Perrin and Egwene again.

I'm only up through the fifth chapter at the time of writing this post, so I will re-visit this thread again when I finish Chapter 12.

How are you liking Jordan's style? The characters? The world building?

Spoilers are allowed up to the end of Chapter 12.


Amelia (Narknon) | 523 comments I must admit, the first time I read this book, the prologue bogged me down. It was confusing, the style was hard for me to get into, but I pressed on. I think I had to restart the prologue several times before I actually got through it and on to the first chapter. Once I got to the first chapter, the story made more sense and I was able to get into the rest of the book.

Upon a reread, the prologue makes much more sense and has all sorts of cool tidbits.

If you're like me at all, keep reading. It'll make sense as you read further into the story.


message 3: by Jon, What's a WoT? (new) - rated it 5 stars

Jon (jonmoss) | 693 comments Mod
Amelia wrote: "Upon a reread, the prologue makes much more sense and has all sorts of cool tidbits."

I remember being confused the first time I read the Prologue as well. But I just forged ahead (as you did). I've now read it multiple times, and each time, something clicks into place.

The first thing I plan to do upon finishing the final book, is to re-read this Prologue. Just for grins.


Mpauli I read the first 4 chapters + prolougue.

Regarding the prologue, I found it helped to establish a sense of epicness. So you directly know, that this series will deal with earth shattering events.

Having only read the first 2 books a few years back, it was easier to get into the first chapters, cause I already knew the characters.
Especially within the first 4 chapters, there seems to be a lot of exposition/infodump happening. Sometimes this is done in a good way, at other times it's less elegant.
I especially disliked the scenes involving Ewin(?), the little boy, whose purpose only seems to be to give information and to provoke the other characters to explain something to him, due to his age.

One interesting fact that I didn't realize in my first read was that Artur Hawking was also called Artur Paendrag. So there is a King Arthur reference here.

What I really liked was the atmosphere of forboding doom, when all boys have an encounter with the black rider.


message 5: by Jon, What's a WoT? (new) - rated it 5 stars

Jon (jonmoss) | 693 comments Mod
Mpauli wrote: "One interesting fact that I didn't realize in my first read was that Artur Hawking was also called Artur Paendrag. So there is a King Arthur reference here."

This little tidbit becomes very important later down the road in future books.


message 6: by Jon, What's a WoT? (new) - rated it 5 stars

Jon (jonmoss) | 693 comments Mod
Mpauli wrote: I especially disliked the scenes involving Ewin(?), the little boy, whose purpose only seems to be to give information and to provoke the other characters to explain something to him, due to his age."

Excellent observation. Now that I think about it, you are entirely correct in that this is an awkward and oft-over-used way to impart information to the reader.

For the most part, though, I believe Jordan does a better-than-average job of introducing us to his world. The first five chapters, excluding the Prologue, could have been set in the back of beyond in Arkansas or a similar secluded hamlet. But thanks to the Prologue, we know we're not in Kansas anymore.


Suzanne | 133 comments I thought the setup was pretty decent - it is perhaps (these days) kind of a stereotype to have the farmboy who has great hidden potential, etc., but maybe it is a stereotype because it has worked very well for many great series. As previous posters said, the prologue gives us a taste of the epic scope.


message 8: by Jon, What's a WoT? (new) - rated it 5 stars

Jon (jonmoss) | 693 comments Mod
I finished through chapter 12 this afternoon. A couple of items I noted, which I'm going to mark as spoilers because they only seem unusual with hindsight (after having read all the future novels printed to date).

(view spoiler)

I am somewhat surprised that my arbitrary division of the novel into roughly 13 chapter per week for a reading schedule worked out so well for this first bit.


John | 123 comments Well, I suppose it's important to remember that Jordan's work set the stage for the boom in epic fantasy that we've had in the past 15 years or so.

There's a lot that feels derivative here, though I think I read somewhere that this was deliberate? That Jordan had initially imagined an older protagonist for the series, but then deliberately switched to young innocents instead, in part as a nod to Tolkien and in part because, well, it just works. I mean, when you're introducing a whole new world to readers, there's something effective about having point-of-view characters who don't know much about the world--in this case the young and yokel.

While we're on the subject of unveiling the world, I liked the way that he splits the group relatively early, both getting them away from the Gandalf-figure of Moiraine and allowing us to see lots of aspects of the world he's created.

Listening on the audio version, I'm not exactly sure where the Chapter 12 cut-off is or where I am, but by Jon's spoiler stuff, I don't think I'm out of this section yet, because (view spoiler)


message 10: by Jon, What's a WoT? (last edited Apr 01, 2012 05:12PM) (new) - rated it 5 stars

Jon (jonmoss) | 693 comments Mod
John wrote: "I don't think I'm out of this section yet, because (view spoiler) "

You are beyond Chapter 12. (view spoiler)

And to answer your other question, (view spoiler).


message 11: by Mpauli (last edited Apr 01, 2012 06:13PM) (new) - rated it 3 stars

Mpauli I finished the first 12 chapters. As mentioned by others above, there are some parallels to Tolkien's LotR.

- In both books a group of young people has to leave their idylic home.

- In both cases this journey is inspired by a wise mage figure.

- Apart from the core group friends decide to go on the journey as well. (Merry + Pip / Egwene)

- Both groups are followed by black cloaked riders (Myrdraal/Nazghul), who are in service of a dark lord.

- Flying creatures act as spies for the dark lord.

And regarding to one of Jon's spoiler observations: (view spoiler)


message 12: by Maggie, The Malazan Queen of Chaos (new) - rated it 3 stars

Maggie K | 874 comments Mod
When I first read this (a long time ago) I was certain Bella was going to turn out to be some special mystical creature. However, she is more like Bill the horse from LotR!


message 13: by Jon, What's a WoT? (last edited Apr 02, 2012 08:01AM) (new) - rated it 5 stars

Jon (jonmoss) | 693 comments Mod
I just remembered one quibble I have with this section. I am an amateur astronomy and I cringe when authors refer to moon phases with wild abandon (and a complete lack of knowledge of physics).

Granted, Jordan's world is not Earth. But if you are going to refer to a full moon the day before Winternight and a sliver of a moon the day after, the natural satellite must be traveling across the sky at an incredible rate of speed.

Just sayin' . . .


Sandra  (Sleo) | 1047 comments Jon wrote: "I just remember one quibble I have with this section. I am an amateur astronomy and I cringe when authors refer to moon phases with wild abandon (and a complete lack of knowledge of physics).

G..."


LOL, picky, picky! It is nice when authors do their research, isn't it?


Isaac Martinez | 60 comments The first time I read this book the prologue captured my interest because (as stated above) of the world-shattering events that took place. Seeing that kind of destruction, I naturally wanted to know what caused it and how.

What got me about the first book was that it was so like "LotR: Fellowship of the Rings" that I grew annoyed because I wasn't sure if the similarities were on purpose or by accident. I didn't see any originality until the last half of book. For the most part this book was a different take on Fellowship. Rand=Frodo (main char), Mat=Pippin (misfit), Perrin=Merry (level head), Moraine=Gandalf (magic/guide), Lan=Aragorn (melee/guide), Green-man=Treebeard.

I've read the entire series and I'm rereading it again for this board and enjoying it. For those who had my same gripes about this tale, it gets better the further along you go. :-)


John | 123 comments I know I brought up the similarities in the first place, but there are the differences to consider, too. While Moiraine=Gandalf, the magic/guide role is now female AND just one of many (yeah, Gandalf was part of a group too, but a much smaller and very different group of wizards). Lan has the Aragorn thing going, (view spoiler), but as a Warder he's in a subservient role.

And, of course, there's the power levels here, too. In Tolkien, Gandalf has magic, but overall we don't see a ton of magic, and none of the other party members have it. Magic seems to be all over the place in Jordan's world--perhaps owing as much to D&D as to Tolkien? Egwene and Nynaeve have the ability, (view spoiler) and we're bound to meet all sorts of Aes Sedai.

It's an interesting idea, too, that magic is split between male and female halves (and that the male side, at least, comes with a huge cost attached).


Travis | 11 comments Regarding Rand's first use of the One Power (view spoiler).

Regarding the parallels between WoT and LotR:
Rand = Frodo
Mat = Pippin
Moiraine & Lan = Gandalf & Aragorn
Bill = Bella
Etc.
I always thought there were SO many parallels, it must've been intentional. I imagined Robert Jordan wanted to tip his hat to the master while knowing his story would soon diverge greatly from the classic LotR plot line.

As for the small-village-farm-boy-destined-for-greatness issue, I don't have a huge hang up with that cliche as long as the author takes us on a unique and interesting journey to discover that greatness (which I believe WoT does successfully!). My gripe is when it feels an author takes that beginning and couldn't find a unique plot from there if he/she were led by the hand. Those are the really frustrating books.


John | 123 comments Regarding the spoiler about Rand's first use of the One Power, (view spoiler)


Rob | 36 comments This was probably my fifth or sixth reading of EoTW. In one respect it's great to be back with the familiar characters. In Chapter 12 the mention of the Red Ajah was a nice reminder of how the politics of the White Tower are some of my favorite scenes in future books.

An interesting thing I hadn't noticed before is that the quotes prior to chapter one are attributed to the Fourth Age yet according to the first few sentences this story takes place in the Third Age. I'll have to pay more attention to these and see what type of clues they give to what happens in the Third Age.

Unfortunately some of the shine has gone off of the writing for me. I was barely a teenager the first time I read this, and I absolutely loved it. While I still think Jordan does very well with characterization and action, I find his description skills sadly lacking. The picture I have in my head of all the characters and settings are based on the cover art. I think from the text I would know that Rand is tall, Perrin has a young blacksmith's build and is "shaggy" and Egwene has a braid, that's it. In comparison to say Steven Erickson or Joe Abercrombie (I swear I can visualize everything in his scenes) the setting just seems generic. The only picture I got of Tarren Ferry is that there were buildings there, that looked different to Rand from what he was used to.

All that being said, I still do think Jordan did have a good sense of pacing and excitement, there just doesn't seem to be a great deal of thought required to follow along.


Naydene | 5 comments I have listened to the whole book on audible and at the end there is a discussion with Robert Jordan. One thing he said that I thought was really good was that when he used to read books like these where a young person was taken from their home town and asked to go on a journey they always seemed to readily agree. He grew up in the country and thought it was more realistic that the young people would not be so eager to go along with the strangers, regardless how wise and magical they might be. This was one aspect of the characters that I really enjoyed, the way they were constantly questioning and continued to view themselves as country people destined to eventually return home at some time in the future.


Dana | 27 comments Rob wrote: "I find his description skills sadly lacking"

It's funny... over the years, one of the common complaints I've seen of the Wheel of Time in general is that there's too much description.


Mach | 41 comments LOL Dana that's what i was thinking too, most people critisize WoT for too much description not lack of it.


John | 123 comments Now, I know that Rob's comment went on to indicate that he didn't feel like the characters were described well enough for him to really picture them, but to describe Jordan's "description skills" as "sadly lacking" could just mean that Jordan isn't good at it--too much, too little, either one shows a lack of skill, right? :)


Rob | 36 comments Dana and Mach - you're exactly correct, in the latter books I do recall being bogged down with too much description. But John's question makes me wonder, is it really because it's too much description or because it's just un-interesting description? How many times is Egwene going to show frustration by tugging on her braid? How often is an Aes Sedai described as having a seemingly ageless face (I can't remember the exact words he uses but it seems they're used every time).

Maybe that's what makes the early books so much better than the later ones for me - Jordan gets away from what he does well - the action and tension - and spends too much time focusing on what he's not so good at - description.

I'm curious about people reading this for the first time, do you have a good mental image of the characters and setting or is it all standard generic farm, village, young hero?


Travis | 11 comments Rob, I agree with you on how repetitive some of Robert Jordan's descriptions were throughout the early part of the series (I.e. Nynaeve tugging on her braid and always being angry). However, one thing this did was to cement their personalities in my mind. This way, when the character goes through a major event providing growth and development, you know it has happened because that character trait is no longer happening.

This series has definitely required a commitment on the reader's part. If I were to judge a book in the series on its own, I would be extremely frustrated either by the pace of plot activity or by the repetitive elements (yep, there goes her braid again...yep, there's another Aes Sedai being as arrogant as possible). However, judging the series as a whole (so far) has created a HUGE, fleshed out world with a myriad of cultures and personalities.

If I know someone interested in "trying it out", I usually warn them to be ready for the long haul if they really want to enjoy the WoT.


Wastrel | 40 comments I disagree completely with the idea that it's a fleshed-out world with a myriad of cultures and personalities. In my opinion, world-building in WOT is so-so (a lot of cut-and-paste, a lot of surface-without-depth, a lot of different-hats-and-accents-so-they-must-be-different superficial differences, masking the fact that everybody is underlying identical to everyone else), and the character-building is terrible. Nobody is really believable, nobody is deep, there are very few differences between people. The women, in particular, are all the same woman with a different hat (except, perhaps, Min, who I thought did get a BIT of distinction now and then). There were times when I was first reading the books that I would literally get Egwene and Elaine mixed up, and I think I was only certain about Nynaeve because she tugged her braid every scene. Not that she was ENTIRELY alone in that...

All in all, I think it's a disappointingly small and parochial world, given the potential.

I also agree with the criticisms about description. Pages and pages and pages of description, yet what do I actually, vividly, remember? I vaguely remember maybe two or three scenes from the entire series, and I think that most of what I remember even there is my own imagination rather than the text itself. Jordan lacks the knack of punching a hole in your head and shoving an image into it - he whacks and whacks and whacks away bluntly like a woodpecker with a rubber beak, and leaves nothing more than a headache and a sense of mild confusion.
[I think that's why his characters are so signature-gesture dominated - I think he KNOWS he needs to punch a hole with a pithy, memorable description that characterises the character instantly, but 'she tugged her braid and sniffed' is the closest he can come.]

---

That's not to say, of course, that there's nothing good about Jordan. [Although to be honest I didn't find much of value in TEOTW - if I hadn't bought the second book so cheaply I might not have continued at all]. There must be something, or else I wouldn't have read eleven books of it. But I think that rather than looking at the character-building or the world-building, I'd look at the plot. The plot has an immense scale, and skillfully incorporates mystery and suspense into the fantasy genre. I don't think I read on to see what the Aiel Wastes would be like, or to learn more about Mat's inner motivations, but to find out who was Black Ajah, what the Forsaken were planning, who killed X, and Y, and Z, and what the significance of such-and-such was, and whether we'd see more of the gholam, and whether A was a reincarnation of B or not, and so on.


Jenny (JennyK89) This is my first time reading TEOTW. I had to reread the prologue because I had no idea what was happening. I still don't fully understand it but I think that's the point. Im really liking the story so far. The Two Rivers reminded me of LOTR right away. I actually really like the characters so far. I don't remember the being described physically that much, but I do see them as having individual personalities. I feel invested in these characters already.


Dana | 27 comments Jenny wrote: "This is my first time reading TEOTW. I had to reread the prologue because I had no idea what was happening. I still don't fully understand it but I think that's the point. Im really liking the stor..."

I think I had the same problem with the prologue on my first time through. I remember I went back and re-read it after I finished the book, and it made a lot more sense.


Lindsey | 55 comments Dana wrote: "Jenny wrote: 'I had to reread the prologue because I had no idea what was happening.' I think I had the same problem with the prologue on my first time through. I remember I went back and re-read it after I finished the book, and it made a lot more sense."

Read it again after you've finished a few more books. The prologues of this series are, um, informative.

My favorite part of this section, besides meeting my favorite character Moraine, are the requests for stories from Thom while he's in Edmond's Field. A careful look at the stories requested (try saying the names out loud if it's not evident) will reveal some fun parallels/history. I didn't catch these till I re-read this one the second or third time.


Heidi | 71 comments The main thing that struck me on this re-read of TEOTW is how likeable Rand is at the beginning... I don't like him very much in the later books.


Mach | 41 comments I liked Rand in all the books i actually skipped alot on my last reread but i read all of Rand's chapters because they are the ones were important things happen. I hate Egwene, in the beginning she was ok but the more i read about her the more i dislike her.


Alex | 104 comments Some of the comments in this thread and thing I've heard about the rest of the series kind of scares me. Does it really get as bad as people say?

It's good so far but the maps don't show up very well on my nook and the internet doesn't seem to be much help at figuring out which maps they put in there. Are the maps important? In a Song of Ice & Fire I was looking at the maps and appendix constantly to figure out where Town X was in relation to everything else or to remind me who Character Y was. The only minor complaint is that the glossary which I read before starting the book mentions a lot of things but nothing about the draghkar that's stalking them. At least there's wikis that help with that.


Shawn Augustyn | 3 comments This is my first time reading the series. So far I've read the prologue and the first three chapters. The prologue was a little confusing in some ways and didn't capture my full attention. That was rectified immediately upon beginning the first chapter of the novel. I like Jordan's style so far. His description/world-building is superb. I'm eager to devour this book and the rest of the series.


message 34: by Jon, What's a WoT? (new) - rated it 5 stars

Jon (jonmoss) | 693 comments Mod
Alex wrote: "Some of the comments in this thread and thing I've heard about the rest of the series kind of scares me. Does it really get as bad as people say?

It's good so far but the maps don't show up very ..."


The first six books of the series are well done. I would say it bogs down a bit from seven to ten, not moving forward much, but still a good read.

On the maps: I also have a Nook Color and am very disappointed in the maps (because you can't zoom in on them). However, I originally read these in hardcover and still have those available to me. I will see if I can find an internet source for the maps and post the links here or in a separate discussion thread for everyone.


Heidi | 71 comments Alex wrote: "It's good so far but the maps don't show up very well on my nook..."

I have the same problem, this is my first time reading the books on my Kindle and the maps are really hard to see and its not as easy to flip over to them whenever I feel like it. Here is a good map I found on Google, I like it better than the one in the book because it's easier to see the borders of each country:

http://fc03.deviantart.net/fs71/i/201...


Kathi | 117 comments Late to the game but I've finally finished through chapter 12.

I am a first time reader of this series.

The Prologue was fascinating and I'll be sure to read it over when I finish the book to see if I have a better idea of how it fits with the ongoing story.

So far the characters seem rather stock but I am already intrigued with the female/male split in the use of the One Source and the idea that some can acquire and learn the skills of magic and some have it inborn and "simply" need to learn to control it.

I was surprised that Rand didn't get more answers from Tam before leaving his village. I think he and his friends accepted rather easily the idea that the were the targets of the Trolloc raid and the village would be safe if they left. Not that they weren't given reason--they were, but it still seemed to be relatively little information with which to make such a momentous decision.

And thanks to a friend from a former online SF/F discussion group, I'm expecting lots of braid-tugging. He liked the series but always complained about the overuse of that particular gesture.


message 37: by Jon, What's a WoT? (new) - rated it 5 stars

Jon (jonmoss) | 693 comments Mod
Kathi wrote: "Late to the game but I've finally finished through chapter 12.

I am a first time reader of this series.

The Prologue was fascinating and I'll be sure to read it over when I finish the book to see..."


Welcome to the read, Kathi. Glad to have you with us. I am looking forward to your insights. A fresh set of eyes will shed new Light on this series.


Margot (freezebaby) | 94 comments To all new readers, I'm curious about your overall impression of the first section -- leading up to the crew's departure from Emond's Field. In my experience, the first 100 pages of EoTW are very polarizing -- people either love them or hate them. How did you feel?

@Amelia and Jon, re: the Prologue - I'm with you guys. In my experience, the prologue is not very accessible or attention-grabbing for new readers. Makes a lot more sense on re-reads.

Jon wrote: "Second, I think I found where Rand used the One Source for the first time. Strange, since I've read this book so many times (at least ten or twelve). Anyone else spot this?"

On my second read-through of this book, I discovered this moment and was very thrilled by the discovery. I love, in retrospect, how Jordan interweaves the hints about the experience of touching the One Source for the first time (Moiraine describes the entire process during the scene where she convinces Nynaeve that she can channel) while Rand is actually experiencing those symptoms. There's a whole trail of moments, with Rand, leading up to his and Matt's arrival in Caemlyn, where he's struggling with the backlash of his first touching.

Rob wrote: "An interesting thing I hadn't noticed before is that the quotes prior to chapter one are attributed to the Fourth Age yet according to the first few sentences this story takes place in the Third Age. I'll have to pay more attention to these and see what type of clues they give to what happens in the Third Age."

Rob, I just noticed that too, in this -- my fifth reading -- of EoTW! Very excited by the new discovery.

Wastrel wrote: "The women, in particular, are all the same woman with a different hat." While I don't entirely agree with Wastrel's views on Jordan's character development skills, I can agree a bit about this last statement. In later books, I grow very tired of the stubbornness and naggy qualities of ALL women in the series. They all seem cut from the same cloth. However, I try to console myself with the fact that the way these women act is part of the culture Jordan has built--stemming from the breaking of the world, by MEN. Women rule now, and they all have a chip on their shoulder about it.


Alex | 104 comments Margot wrote: "To all new readers, I'm curious about your overall impression of the first section -- leading up to the crew's departure from Emond's Field. In my experience, the first 100 pages of EoTW are very p..."

During the prologue I didn't really know what was going on and couldn't get into the book until the trolloc attack. I wouldn't say I hated them but they didn't make a very strong impression.


Margot (freezebaby) | 94 comments Alex wrote: 'Margot wrote: "To all new readers, I'm curious about your overall impression of the first section...'

During the prologue I didn't really know what was going on and couldn't get into the book until the trolloc attack. I wouldn't say I hated them but they didn't make a very strong impression."


Yeah, I always tell readers new to EoTW to at least read through to the trolloc attack -- really, to when they set out to leave the Two Rivers. Then it seems to pick up for everyone from there. It's funny because I just love the first hundred pages. I could live in those pages: country-bumpkin adolescents excited about a gleeman and strangers come to town, pulling pranks, stealing honey cakes, and making eyes at each other. Love it!


Kathi | 117 comments Margot wrote: "To all new readers, I'm curious about your overall impression of the first section -- leading up to the crew's departure from Emond's Field. In my experience, the first 100 pages of EoTW are very polarizing -- people either love them or hate them. How did you feel?"

As a new reader, I did not find that the first 100 pages elicited strong emotions one way or the other. To me it was setting the stage, the background for some of the main characters that might be important as events impel them forward.


Amelia (Narknon) | 523 comments So I'm way behind, but I finally started listening to the audio version of the Eye of the World. I had a lull in my music at work, so I took the plunge and started it. I didn't get too far, but this is a reread/relisten for me.

I'm past the prologue and in the middle of chapter one. I'm just hoping I will be slow enough at work that I can listen to it without being distracted too much.

It took me a few minutes to realize how the prologue started. It seemed like I was thrown into the middle of the book, which is not a good thing when one is trying to figure out which track is the first one. Turns out I did have them labelled correctly.

I found the prologue to be quite enlightening on a 're-reread'. I wonder if the end of this series is going to turn out like the prologue or if things will actually be different this time.


Angelof | 49 comments Finally made it to chapter 13 so I can view this thread :P I liked it a lot. in a way it reminded me of how Flint and Shea Ohmsford that to flee their village because of an attack in Sword of Shannara but I like how it was done. I don't mind recurring themes especially if they add new flavor.

I kind of like the idea of the mention of a change in the weather. just like the mention of "winter is coming" in A Song of Ice and Fire, there's mention of Winter never seems to have ended despite the Spring Festival.


Alicia | 11 comments I finished Chapter 12 last night. I'm enjoying it so far; although I must say the trolloc attack came not a moment too soon. It was just past the point where I started to get bored with the set-up.

I'm not too enamored by the descriptions, but I'm really liking the sense of history in the world. Right now, it seems like it will be very fleshed out. Though, I was a bit disappointed not to get more answers from Tam before Rand had to leave. I don't feel much one way or the other for most of the characters yet, but Perrin gets a +1 for carrying an axe.

Also, I'm not too keen on Rand's dream sequence, but it struck me as a memory of a past life, or perhaps memories of several lives all mashed together, ending at different points.


Vaughn I'm about to start my reread of the series. Is anyone else just starting ( reread or first time )that would like to join me?


message 46: by Jon, What's a WoT? (new) - rated it 5 stars

Jon (jonmoss) | 693 comments Mod
Vaughn wrote: "I'm about to start my reread of the series. Is anyone else just starting ( reread or first time )that would like to join me?"

Welcome to FBCS Vaughn. Glad you found us.

As you can see from this page (the View Activity page for the Eye of the World: http://www.goodreads.com/group/show_b...) two people in the group started reading this novel in August.

I also monitor all the Wheel of Time threads so feel free to post in any of the appropriate topics.

Thanks and welcome.

Jon


Traci Very, very, late to the read. I meant to read these with the group but...you know how it can be. Stuff happened and before I knew it it's December.
I read the first few books in high school and then dropped out (of the books not school). So I'm re-reading and reading for the first time.
First impression, I love the prologue. Absolutely love it. Though I liked it too much. I want to know more about what's going on here. I take it there's more in later books? I do find the ties to Lord of the Rings to be a little too tight to be coincidental. At least I hope Jordan meant for a reader to get it. I think of these books as being in the same world as Lord of the Rings but in a far furture. I guess. I remember the first time I read these I hated Moiraine and my favorite character was Mat. Now I like Moiraine and can't stand Mat. And strangely my favorite female character is Nynaeve though I know most readers can't stand her. Egwene I thought was too shallow. She doesn't seem to care much for anything or anyone around her. At least that's how I see it at first.


message 48: by Vaughn (last edited Dec 08, 2012 03:51PM) (new) - rated it 5 stars

Vaughn Traci wrote: "Very, very, late to the read. I meant to read these with the group but...you know how it can be. Stuff happened and before I knew it it's December.
I read the first few books in high school and th..."


When I did me reread of Eye, I noticed how winey Rand is, how more mature Perrin is, that I still find Mat annoying at this stage in the writing, and how wonderful Moraine really is. This of course is not how I first read it and I've read the entire series to date (though I'm realizing that I don't remember too much about some of the later books.


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