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James Patterson
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Favorite Authors/Books/Series > Patterson Opinions Sought (Reposted)

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message 51: by Tyrone (new)

Tyrone (28daysearlier) | 31 comments Julie wrote: "I also hear rumors that the family of Robert B Parker also intends to bring someone in the continue writing under his name. Do you feel cheated or scammed when reading books like that? ( I'm not being sarcastic, I'm being serious) There is a slight difference. But, you do know when you see another person's name on the cover what's going on. We also don't know who is being paid what in those arrangements."

It's not uncommon for an estate to continue on a series started by a popular author...the problem is when it's not clear who has written the book. I haven't read the new Jessie Stone written by Michael Bradman but it is clear that the book is not written by Parker so i don't have a problem with the principle...but that's no guarantee the books up to Parker's standard of course. I recently had the same issue with R.D. Wingfield's Frost. Two authors have collaborated and written a prequel First Frost and they do the same as with the Parker Covers they say R.D.Wingfield's Frost and then give the authors name, James Henry. Provided it is clear i have no problem with paying for the book...even if i may not pick up any other future books in the series if it is not up to standard.


message 52: by Scout (new)

Scout (goodreadscomscout) | 1093 comments I stopped buying books years ago. My shelves are full, and I'm out of room. AND it's so expensive. My town has a great library, and I'd have to say it's one of my best friends.


message 53: by Curlyhair (new)

Curlyhair | 143 comments I enjoy a good JP book now and again. Unless you are new to reading, you know exactly what you are picking up to read.
You know you aren't reading a pulizer prize winner for literature. You do know however, it will be an easy read and entertaining - for the most part - including a plot with at least a beginning, middle and end . If you don't like his books, don't pick one up to read.


message 54: by Scout (last edited Apr 20, 2012 06:22PM) (new)

Scout (goodreadscomscout) | 1093 comments Once I found out how he was using his name and not his talent to rake in money, I did stop picking up his books. Doesn't mean I can't have an opinion about what he's doing. That is, after all, what this thread is about.


message 55: by Tyrone (new)

Tyrone (28daysearlier) | 31 comments Scout wrote: "Once I found out how he was using his name and not his talent to rake in money, I did stop picking up his books. Doesn't mean I can't have an opinion about what he's doing. That is, after all, what this thread is about. "

Amen.


message 56: by Curlyhair (new)

Curlyhair | 143 comments Scout wrote: "Once I found out how he was using his name and not his talent to rake in money, I did stop picking up his books. Doesn't mean I can't have an opinion about what he's doing. That is, after all, what..."

My comment was general, just like the rest on here, it wasn't aimed at any individual.


message 57: by Charmaine (new)

Charmaine Clancy (charmaineclancy) | 7 comments I respect JP for his marketing skills and like a lot of his earlier thrillers. I don't mind co-writers, but prefer when that's upfront and on the cover. I started the Women's Murder Club series and liked it at first but lost momentum, I thought the main character became a bit whiney?

I am grateful to JP for producing his line of kids books, the Daniel X books have been fantastic for getting boys to read (high school teacher), short punchy chapters with lots of action and disgusting aliens. I'm looking forward to reading his series about Angels


message 58: by Scout (new)

Scout (goodreadscomscout) | 1093 comments Curlyhair, I should have said "we" instead of "I." I know you weren't being personal. Sorry.


message 59: by Curlyhair (new)

Curlyhair | 143 comments Scout wrote: "Curlyhair, I should have said "we" instead of "I." I know you weren't being personal. Sorry."

No prob.


message 60: by Lea (new)

Lea Kennick | 1 comments Seems like his Alex Cross character sounds more like a spoiled teenager than a grown man. yep..pretty low quality writing


message 61: by Tyrone (new)

Tyrone (28daysearlier) | 31 comments Nena wrote: "Patterson is not Tolstoy. He served his purpose and if he or anyone else borrowing his name decides to write a book that keeps me turning pages and fills my lonely or boring time, that's good enough for me. "

It think that is fine to an extent but you keep making the mistake of say 'he' and 'him' which is the reason some of us are so annoyed. The truth is his name is just there for marketing purposes so at this point he can only have peripheral input into the other novels. There is a pretense that these are somehow Patterson books and anybody quickly grabbing a book in an airport could be fooled into picking it up because they fondly remember one of his earlier (solo) novels. I'd just prefer some honesty from the publishers like reversing the size of the names on the cover would probably better represent the level of creative input into the book you might be about to purchase in a hurry.

I guess it's moot anyway...he has spread himself too thin and the quality of his solo writing has diminished appreciably. While there is no doubt he is a commercial machine (now being copied by other publishers and bestselling authors) his personal regard and acclaim has diminished to the point that many people who enjoyed his books enough to become loyal readers have left the fold.

When the wind shifts elsewhere as it inevitably does will he be left with any true Patterson fans having spent them so carelessly in pursuit of the dollars.


message 62: by Weenie (new)

Weenie | 161 comments Nice to see this thread still ticking along!

Picked up a copy of The Jester recently from a charity shop, ready for my next holiday. It says it's by James Patterson but according to some, it's probably actually written by Andrew Gross.

I'm expecting a fast and easy read that doesn't require much concentration. I'm sure I'll enjoy it and even if I don't, I'll get over it.


message 63: by Malina (new)

Malina (mv64) | 46 comments I am like many on here, read his earlier work "Alex Cross" but not much of his latest books. I have found myself doing that with a lot of series though. I am not sure if they (authors) just run out of material or if the author themselves are tired of the series but keep putting them out because the fans demand it and the money is good.


message 64: by Tyrone (last edited Jun 29, 2012 06:08AM) (new)

Tyrone (28daysearlier) | 31 comments A combination of both i think. Although it is always frustrating for a fan, i like writers who take time to do other projects and then come back if they have something to write about with that character. I'd much rather have fewer stories of higher quality than find my respect for a specific author/character diminish to the point that i really can't be bothered to continue.


message 65: by Scout (new)

Scout (goodreadscomscout) | 1093 comments Saw Tyler Perry talking about playing Alex Cross. Think he'll be good in the role? Definitely a change for him.


message 66: by Weenie (new)

Weenie | 161 comments Scout wrote:"Saw Tyler Perry talking about playing Alex Cross. Think he'll be good in the role? Definitely a change for him."

Yeah, he seems to look the part and is probably of the right age. Always thought Morgan Freeman was dreadfully miscast in 'Kiss The Girls'.


message 67: by Jonathan (last edited Jul 02, 2012 04:26AM) (new)

Jonathan Peto (JonathanPeto) | 18 comments I didn't have the patience to read everyone's comments on this thread and I've only read one JP book, but I was under the impression that when his name appears on a book with a co-author that JP wrote an outline for the story, the co-author then uses his outline to write a first draft, then JP goes over that draft. It was my impression he started doing this when he realized he had more ideas than he could write. I'm not sure if that's been the procedure with every one of his co-authored books but I think that is how it started.


message 68: by Tyrone (last edited Jul 02, 2012 09:45AM) (new)

Tyrone (28daysearlier) | 31 comments I think that that may have been the case initially...now i think it is just 'commercial model' for the author and publisher. More worrying is that it is a model that is being adopted by more and more 'best selling authors and their publishers.

The effect on JP has been that his recent solo authored works have been diminishing in quality.


message 69: by Kerrie (new)

Kerrie (Shenal) | 3 comments I think Patterson's books are more something a person should read when they want something that's simple and easy-to-read. His books are often straight forward and his books were the ones that started me off reading Thriller books when I was 12. If you want something that's not too deep than go for his ones. One day reads.


message 70: by Christine US (new)

Christine US (ChristineUS) | 10 comments I enjoyed the first Women's Murder Club books...like 1-6. About #7 I lost interest and just didn't want to continue. Before that, I thought they were well-written and the characters were lively and interesting.

I also read his book on King Tut - The Murder of King Tut. It wasn't bad, it was interesting enough to keep me going...but I know it wasn't an expert take on Egyptology.


message 71: by L.H. (new)

L.H. Thomson (LHThomson) | 69 comments The idea of "selling" your name and having ghost writers is just .... uggh. What a crappy, cynical marketing tool.

Hey... that's a good band name: Cynical Marketing Tool.

Then again, the dude sells books even though people don't seem to think much of them. So he's doing something right. Figuring out how to sell books is tougher than figuring out creative ways to kill characters of dubious virtue.


message 72: by Brian (new)

Brian Thornton | 12 comments James Patterson is an unabashed marketing guy who makes no bones about it. He studied the market to see where it lacked a unique kind of protagonist/detective and the result was Alex Cross.

Can't fault him for what he does or how he does it, any more than you can fault Tom Clancy for doing the same thing with vastly less success (to say nothing of Cussler in his later years).

On the other hand if you read him expecting Hemingway or Proust, et. al., you're likely to be disappointed. That's not the market Patterson's writing (or paying people to write) for.


message 73: by Tyrone (new)

Tyrone (28daysearlier) | 31 comments I don't think anybody here is expecting anything of the sort. Most of us were fans. He was great at intelligently plotted high tension with engaging and well developed (over time) characters.

The Truth is that many of us don't like the 'marketing tool/ ploy' or whatever you want to call it. His commecial endeavours have also diluted his solo writing because lets face it, his latest solo efforts are just not as good as they were.

The obvious money grab diminishes him in the eyes of people like me who were fans of his writing and when his popularity wanes and the market forgets him he won't be left with a hardcore support like many are as they fade from the spotlight because most of us will have left him long since. Lets hope for his sake he likes money and banks enough while he still can because he won't be remembered with the affection or be shown the loyalty that many writers are.


message 74: by Weenie (new)

Weenie | 161 comments Tyrone wrote: "Lets hope for his sake he likes money and banks enough while he still can because he won't be remembered with the affection or be shown the loyalty that many writers are."

Now that would be an interesting question to ask writers - be remembered with affection and loyalty or to actually make a living/money from your writing?

The answer will probably be both but when there's bills to be paid, surely the latter!?

Back on topic, I don't mind the marketing tool thing - perhaps it's something many other authors wish they could do (if they're not doing it already).


message 75: by Tyrone (new)

Tyrone (28daysearlier) | 31 comments Weenie wrote: "Now that would be an interesting question to ask writers - be remembered with affection and loyalty or to actually make a living/money from your writing?

The answer will probably be both but when there's bills to be paid, surely the latter!?

Back on topic, I don't mind the marketing tool thing - perhaps it's something many other authors wish they could do (if they're not doing it already). "


I understand your point and I agree for most writers but my comments were really addressed to writers who have already achieved a level of success, say able to write full time, able to sell books to the main publishers without having it being already written and maybe had a book or two on one or other of the best sellers lists.

I understand that there are a huge number of writers who don't fit that description and this 'marketing strategy' wouldn't work for them because their name won't sell books just by being (twice the size of the actual author) on the cover.

I still maintain that Patterson's strategy has watered down his reputation and caused a decline in the quality of his solo work. He can pretend he has more great ideas than he knows what to do with but his latest solo offerings prove that is no longer the case.

I might only be talking for myself but he is no longer an author whose books i buy on release and keep and read multiple times. All the later ones have been bought at discount, months after release, sometimes 2nd hand, and then either donated or sold on after one read.

If there are others out there like me who were onto his books from day one and now feel very different he has done himself a disservice...he may have financial security and he may hold records for books sold but he won't be remembered with affection like many authors who put craft over financial gain. Of course...he could probably care less.

For me he has gone the way of Lee Child whose books i can never see in the same light after he endorsed Tom Cruise as his 6'5" 250lbs hero Jack Reacher in the upcoming film 'One Shot'. He not only sold the rights (which i understand) but he went on a publicity campaign saying he believed that TC was the right choice and there are no actors out there who could physically match Reacher. The Amazon forum on this subject (started before the deal was done) begs to differ and has identified many actors who were a physical fit and can act. Of course the deal (with backend) is reputed to be worth $20m so he had a reason to sell out his character.


message 76: by Gatorman (new)

Gatorman | 7320 comments Brian wrote: "James Patterson is an unabashed marketing guy who makes no bones about it. He studied the market to see where it lacked a unique kind of protagonist/detective and the result was Alex Cross.

Can't..."


I most certainly can fault him. He's an embarassment to the whole concept of being an "author". Nobody expects Hemingway but he's not even a decent thriller writer. He is a hack. Don't care how much money he makes.


message 77: by Georgia (new)

Georgia | 440 comments Well, Gaterman, your opinion is what this country is all
about, and too, it is Patterson's right to make money.
He gives other unknown writers opportunities they may
never have had. They may be horrible writers, He may be a horrible writer, author. We do not have to read his books. I just read the number 1 thriller. I hated it and wish I had not spent the time, such waste when
I could have read a good book. I finished it because
I wanted to know what happened to the married couple
in the end. Not worth it. This is what is good about America, we have choices. So now I have decided to
read (I have a list) the top 100 mystery books
starting with The Woman in White by Wilkie Collins.
If I can't get it from the library, I will try to buy a used copy on Amazon.


message 78: by Weenie (new)

Weenie | 161 comments Tyrone wrote: "I might only be talking for myself but he is no longer an author whose books i buy on release and keep and read multiple times."

He's never been that kind of author to me but I guess if he had been, I'd be just as annoyed as you are!


message 79: by Tyrone (new)

Tyrone (28daysearlier) | 31 comments Yeah...please post a link. Sounds interesting.


message 80: by Shannon (new)

Shannon (ShannonDIsbell) | 124 comments I loved his Alex Cross Series I am almost done reading it all. I mostly check out his books at the library or if I am in a 2nd hand store and if they have any of his book i usely pick them up for like .50 to a buck

My Aunt Loves his Michael Bennett series she said to her its bettr then his Alex Cross series?

What do you guys think of his
Witch & Wizard series? I only read the first 2 books the first one i like but the 2nd one not too much haven't check out his 3rd one yet so i don't know if i like it or not


message 81: by John (new)

John (Godrin) | 3 comments Beth NC wrote: "Patterson should be read as a fun quick read. Just as enjoyment, not for his literary style, or underlying issues or any depth. His books are fun, quick, and easy and sometimes we just need that..."

You spot on Beth these are good books but are so easy to read its just to pass the time ans for enjoyment more then his literery tallents.


message 82: by Annie (new)

Annie Michelle   (ajoyim) I have favorite authors I read for enjoyment or relaxation and then favorite authors I read for enlightenment or learning, depending on how I feel at the time...a book for every need!


message 83: by Brenda (new)

Brenda John wrote: "Beth NC wrote: "Patterson should be read as a fun quick read. Just as enjoyment, not for his literary style, or underlying issues or any depth. His books are fun, quick, and easy and sometimes w..."

I enjoy Patterson for the same reason:) I enjoy Cross, Bennett and Womens Murder club....


message 84: by Marc-Antoine (new)

Marc-Antoine I also enjoy Patterson, it's usually a nice light read. I have just preordered]Zoo


message 85: by Marc-Antoine (new)

Marc-Antoine And am looking forward to it.


message 86: by Laurin (new)

Laurin (LaurinLooLoo) I agree. Patterson should not be read for soul-searching/enlightenment purposes. It is strictly a no-brainer kind of read.


message 87: by Afsana (last edited Dec 10, 2012 03:26PM) (new)

Afsana (afsanaz) | 178 comments I used to buy jp's book and/or go to library and get them straight away . However I no longer do that. I will now get from library or buy thm at a discount in paperback or 2nd hand.

I agree that the quality has gone down but good for an easy read.

It is upto people whether they buy his books or notand if he believes the "co authoring" is the way that is his right.

He is at least having input and can decide on what his name should be used for ulike the writers who have died and their families are now using their name to make money.

Virginia andrews I think only realy wote a few of her series others were a draft and majority were made up by someone else using the same formula. so all the same


message 88: by Scout (new)

Scout (goodreadscomscout) | 1093 comments Tyrone, I agree with you: "The obvious money grab diminishes him in the eyes of people like me who were fans of his writing and when his popularity wanes and the market forgets him he won't be left with a hardcore support like many are as they fade from the spotlight because most of us will have left him long since."

Those of us who think of writers as artists who have respect for their craft are disappointed in Patterson. He's traded his credibility as an artist for money, and that's a shame.


message 89: by Tyrone (new)

Tyrone (28daysearlier) | 31 comments Thanks Scout...you said it far better than me.

For all the rest of you referring to James Patterson books and saying how they are great light entertainment or quick reads or whatever...please stop...he doesn't even write most of them! In what way are the James Patterson books?


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