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Spotlighted Reads > Adaptations on Review

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message 1: by Zeljka (last edited Mar 04, 2013 02:06AM) (new)

Zeljka (ZTook) | 1422 comments Mod
This thread is for movies you have already seen, without previous reading of the books they were adapted from. It might be also good starting point for new reads - if movie was good, why not to see it again after reading the source it came from :-)


message 2: by Zeljka (last edited Aug 10, 2012 04:45AM) (new)

Zeljka (ZTook) | 1422 comments Mod
Few days ago, I saw a movie called The Hunter. It is a fictionalized story of the hunt for the last tasmanian tiger - and surprisingly too, it is based on a well praised novel of the same name, The Hunter by Julia Leigh The Hunter by Julia Leigh. I didn't know that before seeing the movie and now I want to read the book.
I wasn't quite satisfied with the ending of the film, it left me actually puzzled by the solution provided, but the scenery of Tasmania was awesome and the sad allure of the story about the extinct species was more than enough to please me. I truly recommend seeing this film, as the actors were good also - Willem Dafoe, Sam Neill and Frances O'Connor.


message 3: by Tazitazitazi (new)

Tazitazitazi | 10 comments I love Forrest Gump - the movie. It has a heart warming story and a great sound track, and it's funny. So after a few bad and emotionally heavy books I finally decided to read Forrest Gump - the book, expecting it to be the same as the movie. Boy was I wrong! It took me some 20 pages (from 179 pages) to realize the book has a completely different atmosphere and a much darker tone than the movie. So, beginning was disappointing, but I won’t stop reading.


message 4: by Zeljka (last edited Mar 25, 2012 11:24AM) (new)

Zeljka (ZTook) | 1422 comments Mod
Tazitazitazi wrote: "I love Forrest Gump - the movie. It has a heart warming story and a great sound track, and it's funny. So after a few bad and emotionally heavy books I finally decided to read..."

I remember having same feelings with the book - having found the movie great, the book was just mediocre. However, it was so long time ago, I would like to read it again as well as to see the movie. Well, the latter would be sooner I guess ;-)


message 5: by Zeljka (last edited Aug 10, 2012 04:46AM) (new)

Zeljka (ZTook) | 1422 comments Mod
..

Last night I have seen new Scorsese's movie, really decent Hugo, based on Brian Selznick's The Invention of Hugo Cabret by Brian SelznickThe Invention of Hugo Cabret. Although not one of my favourites, Scorsese proves himself again as a masterful storyteller. There is magic in the air -- the design, cinematography and the effects are amazing. And - as it usually goes with me regarding the good movies adapted from the books, I want to read the book too :-)


message 6: by Zeljka (last edited Aug 10, 2012 04:47AM) (new)

Zeljka (ZTook) | 1422 comments Mod


I've seen Julie & Julia (2009) a few days ago, and had had more time just today to check on the comments about the movie and its real-life characters, Julia Child and Julie Powell. I myself am not familiar with neither of them, so I found the movie really interesting, especially the parts related to Julia Child. Meryl Streep is absolutely amazing actress. Amy Adams as Julie Powell was cute, even cuter than the real-life authoress, if we are to believe the comments about her and her blog. I was honestly appalled by the amount of negativity directed toward her - I understand if you dislike someone's work, but to say to hate it, that's a bit harsh word to use, isn't it? However, as I am not familiar neither to the Julie Powell's blog where she wrote about her culinary exploits of Julia Child's cookbook, nor to the both authoresses (this word sounds really awful), I'll limit myself just to the movie - which I found really interesting and worth seeing.


message 7: by Zeljka (last edited Aug 10, 2012 04:48AM) (new)

Zeljka (ZTook) | 1422 comments Mod


Last week I've seen Red Dog (2011). Based on a true story about a tramp dog that was very dear to the whole community in the Australian outback (you may check it on wikipedia of course), but made on a fictionalized version of the story, Red Dog by Louis de Bernières Red Dog by Louis de Bernières.
To be honest, movie is too cute for me, overly dramatic, the life in the middle of nowhere seems so great (I really doubt that) and hard work they do doesn't look so hard from this movie's perspective. BUT - the characters are likable, the scenery beautiful and you really can't miss with the dog character if you like animals and wish to give your family some nice PG-rated entertainment one rainy afternoon.


message 8: by Zeljka (last edited Aug 10, 2012 04:49AM) (new)

Zeljka (ZTook) | 1422 comments Mod


Seen few days ago The Best Exotic Marigold Hotel (2011), really charming film based on a novel, later renamed, These Foolish Things by Deborah Moggach by Deborah Moggach. I liked it not only for a bunch of awe-inspiring British actors and actresses here united all together, but also for the warm and funny tale about older people and their (un)fulfilled wishes and dreams, about people very often ignored, but very much alive despite the years on their back. Highly recommended!


message 9: by Zeljka (new)

Zeljka (ZTook) | 1422 comments Mod


Yesterday I've seen The Tempest (2010), that bravely changed a lead character of the original source, The Tempest by William Shakespeare from male to female. And I think that it was done superbly - Helen Mirren was never so powerful on the screen as here. The fantastic elements and the music were awesome, but as I've read the play really long time ago, I can't vouch for its faithfulness to the spirit of the play.


message 10: by Noirfifre (new)

Noirfifre | 127 comments The World of Downton Abbey by Jessica Fellowes and A Game of Thrones (A Song of Ice and Fire, #1) by George R.R. Martin


message 11: by [deleted user] (new)

Watched last weekend:




The Big Sleep, an adaptation of The Big Sleep by Raymond Chandler.
Alcohol, cigarettes and guns. I'm not a big fan of film noir, but it was not bad and had some funny moments too.




The Deep Blue Sea, an adaptation of the play The Deep Blue Sea by Terence Rattigan.
It is a quiet little piece of art, which depicts only one day of a couple who is about to break up.
It managed to get by without sappy or overdramatic scenes (which I actually love) and was still able to grip me from the very beginning.


message 12: by Zeljka (new)

Zeljka (ZTook) | 1422 comments Mod


Beautiful scenery. Cute actors. Awesome Kristin Scott-Thomas... But the whole story seemed superficial. Maybe I'd like the book better -- Salmon Fishing in the Yemen by Paul Torday.


message 13: by Reev (new)

Reev Robledo (reevrobledo) The Runaway Jury by John Grisham

I'm a Grisham fan and I love the movie version of Runaway Jury starring John Cusack and Rachel Weisz.

I'm sure the book is great as well.


message 14: by Brad (new)

Brad Bowling (spedway) | 1 comments I thoroughly enjoyed reading Abraham Lincoln: Vampire Hunter. Without any recommendations, I bought it as my first digital book and read it on my Droid X through a Kindle app in a week. Why? The title alone grabbed my attention, and I had to see how a writer could bring together the Civil War president and vampirism.

I loved the book (more detail later if anyone wants to discuss it), but was more than a little disappointed in this summer's movie adaptation. Only about 10% of the book made it into the film, even though Seth Grahame-Smith wrote both. That was a shame because the novel really made Lincoln's life and the Civil War come alive for me in a way that history class never did. I know, pretty scary that it took vampires - a topic/villain I really care nothing about - to make me learn some history.

The movie is fun if some action and loud noises are all you crave from a cinema experience, but the book is way better.


message 15: by [deleted user] (last edited Oct 18, 2012 06:26AM) (new)

Brad wrote: "I thoroughly enjoyed reading Abraham Lincoln: Vampire Hunter. Without any recommendations, I bought it as my first digital book and read it on my Droid X through a Kindle app in a week. Why? The ti..."

I've seen The Conspirator some time ago and found it very interesting.
I'm not an American and have no clue about American history, but Abraham Lincoln seems to be quite an icon to the Americans (even another Lincoln movie will be released next month).

If the book is historically correct I'll most definitely read it.
Who can resist some badass vampires anyway? :D


message 16: by [deleted user] (new)



Equus, based on the play Equus by Peter Shaffer. He even wrote the screenplay for this movie.
It's about a 17 year old boy who ends up in a mental hospital, because he blinded six horses.
While we are gradually exposed to the things which led him to do this, the doctor in charge is questioning himself if the way, how society "cures" mental ill people, is the right solution.
I would recommend that movie to people who are interested in psychology or the human mind in general. But be aware it contains nudity and the blinding of the horses is shown too.


message 17: by Zeljka (last edited Nov 09, 2012 12:40PM) (new)

Zeljka (ZTook) | 1422 comments Mod


Last night I took a break from all the activities, watching an old fashioned horror film - with surprisingly spicy scenes with one certain Underworld heroine - Haunted, made 1995. While special effects were trite in regard with today's technology, the ending a bit cheesy, overall storytelling was quite effective. Of course, it is based on James Herbert's classic horror novel, Haunted.


message 18: by Kali (last edited Nov 09, 2012 01:08PM) (new)

Kali Srikanth | 8 comments If I can name biographies, its Oscar wining movie A Beautiful Mind by Sylvia Nasar which accounts just only about 20-25% of the book.


message 19: by [deleted user] (new)

Kalisetty wrote: "If I can name biographies, its Oscar wining movie A Beautiful Mind by Sylvia Nasar which accounts just only about 20-25% of the book."

I had this book some years ago, but real life went crazy and I gave it away unread.

However, I love, love, love this movie and would still be interested in reading the book.
Would you say it would be an enrichment to read the book, or did the movie cover all the interesting parts?


message 20: by Alana (new)

Alana (alanasbooks) | 550 comments Mod
I would love to read it, it's one of my favorite movies and I would love to learn more about the actual circumstances.


message 21: by Svevida (new)

Svevida | 12 comments I'm summoning the courage to read The Hours
The Hours by Michael Cunningham
But before that I have to read Mrs. Dallaway
Mrs. Dalloway by Virginia Woolf
I really like both movies and am curious about the books.


message 22: by Kali (new)

Kali Srikanth | 8 comments Dodo wrote: "Kalisetty wrote: "If I can name biographies, its Oscar wining movie A Beautiful Mind by Sylvia Nasar which accounts just only about 20-25% of the book."

I had this book some years ago, but real ..."


Like You said yes, its really an amazing movie but to my surprise they twisted (never admitted in some cases)too many facts in his life only to make Nash's character more likable (It didn't matter much to Nash though, he visited the sets regularly and made his contribution to the crew as usual). I would surely recommend you to read the book, its bit heavy since its some 460 odd pages long but Im sure by the end of it you will find it really inspiring and worth spending time. (But I caution you few parts are really disturbing, especially his hospitalization days). Here is the link for my review- http://www.goodreads.com/review/show/... only if you find it useful. Good luck. :-)


message 23: by Kali (new)

Kali Srikanth | 8 comments You can add one more awesomest among the awesomest movies and Oscar nominee The Shawshank Redemption by Stephen King to the list. :-)


message 24: by Zeljka (last edited Mar 04, 2013 01:46AM) (new)

Zeljka (ZTook) | 1422 comments Mod
Aurelio Zen TV Mini Series
In the last few days I've seen Zen TV mini-series (2011), based on three Aurelio Zen novels by Michael Dibdin, in TV series order:
01 - Vendetta (Aurelio Zen 02) by Michael Dibdin Vendetta, 02 - Cabal by Michael Dibdin Cabal and 03 - Ratking by Michael DibdinRatking.

Now, I liked series enough to see all the episodes, but I couldn't accept the whole British cast, otherwise superb, playing real Italians. It was pretty obvious they didn't translate well in that field, after all, they are genuine Britons -- they couldn't catch the mannerisms, expressions, ways of talking and walking Italians have. I've been in Italy couple of times (living across it), but for those unacquainted with their peculiarities, it's enought to see only one episode of Italian Il commissario Montalbano (1999– ) series, based on superb Andrea Camilleri's mystery novels, to know what I am talking about. It was fun ride anyway.


message 25: by Zeljka (new)

Zeljka (ZTook) | 1422 comments Mod


Two days ago I read Legends of the Fall, all three novellas in it. The one I least liked was exactly the title novel, and the one I liked the most was Revenge. Although it is impossible to like any of the characters in every Jim Harrison's story, the stories are well told. This one, Revenge, was especially good. The only complaint I have is that women in Jim Harrison's stories do not speak and act much and even then are incomprehensible. Love in his stories is purely physical. When men in his stories fall in love, they fall in love with sexual aspects of their women.
The movie however, depending on which version you saw (director's or theatrical), had ambiguous success in translating that story to the screen. I saw director's cut, but read afterwards what were the differences with the theatrical cut. Director's cut is faster paced, and more oriented toward their physical love affair, while theatrical cut fleshed out better all the sides of the story, the lovers' and the betrayed husband's. I think director's cut is more faithful to the story. Yes, there's more sex in it (thankfully the fast forward button saved me of these otherwise arduous fifteen minutes of my precious time), but I don't think Harrison's take on their love is any different. The romance was scarce, at least I didn't feel it, and I actually thought how annoying these characters are. The woman married the man thrice her age, and we should compassionate with her. Why? If she were forced to it, I would. The main hero betrayed his friend -- he may be evil, but hey, I didn't know that gives you a free pass to take his wife away from him. Not to mention he was obnoxious all the way toward everybody who tried to help him. I had actually a terrifying thought -- Tibey was definitely twisted soul, and obviously very dangerous enemy, but he was really the only character who actually followed a code of honor. The point of the story? Beware of love - it makes fools and lovely corpses of everybody.


message 26: by Zeljka (new)

Zeljka (ZTook) | 1422 comments Mod
Predestination

I saw Predestination last night. Now that was weird experience. If anything, it made me awfully curious to find and read the story it originated from, All You Zombies by Robert A. Heinlein.


message 27: by Marcy (new)

Marcy (Marshein) | 23 comments Zeljka wrote: "

Seen few days ago The Best Exotic Marigold Hotel (2011), really charming film based on a novel, later renamed, These Foolish Things by Deborah Moggach by Deborah Moggach. I liked ..."


I loved this film, and I see they are making a sequel with most of the same actors.


message 28: by Marcy (new)

Marcy (Marshein) | 23 comments deleted user wrote: "Equus, based on the play Equus by Peter Shaffer. He even wrote the screenplay for this movie.
It's about a 17 year old boy who ends up in a mental hospital, because he b..."


As I recall, it also hints at bestiality, no? Which does not offend me, by the way, I'm just sayin'. Horses are very erotic as symbols and in actuality, and I remember the movie as very daring.


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Books mentioned in this topic

Forrest Gump (other topics)
The Invention of Hugo Cabret (other topics)
Red Dog (other topics)
The Hunter (other topics)
These Foolish Things (other topics)
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Authors mentioned in this topic

Brian Selznick (other topics)
Julia Child (other topics)
Julie Powell (other topics)
Louis de Bernières (other topics)
Julia Leigh (other topics)
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