2012 - Ms. Richardson L.A. discussion

The Hunger Games (The Hunger Games, #1)
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Examining Archetypes

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Rebecca | 7 comments Mod
In class we have been discussing villain, hero and general gender archetypes. Consider what you have learned about these archetypes. In the Hunger Games, there are moments when Collins' characters embrace and defy the archetypes. What is your opinion, is Collins more likely to embrace the archetype or defy it? Select one character to make your argument. Make sure to refer back to what you know about the archetype and use specific examples from the text.


message 2: by Lilibeth (last edited Jan 22, 2012 05:33PM) (new) - rated it 4 stars

Lilibeth Ceja | 7 comments Suzanne Collins made Katniss into a character that embraces the male archtype. The common male archetype characteristics would be stoic and controlling. The male archetype also embraces the job of the protector,provider and hunter. In the Hunger Games,Suzanne Collins made Katniss embody the male archetype through out the the novel and reject the female archetype. The characteristics of the male archetype of protector, provider and hunter are those normally given to the male gender. A protector is someone who makes sure no harm comes to the family. A provider is the one that makes sure the family has what is needed like food,shelter and are healthy. A hunter just makes sure the family has food.
In The Hunger Games, the charater Katniss Everdeen embraces the role of protector,provider and hunter for her family by pulling them through after her father's death.Katniss is the hunter in the family by going into the woods to hunt. She is the protector by protecting prim and not allowing her to take any tesserae out. Katniss is also the provider in her and her family's survival. This all shows Katniss embodying the male arhetype int he novel.


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Parker Andrezzi | 4 comments In this story, Peeta Mellark embraces the female archetype most of the time because he is very sensitive towards Katniss both in the arena and during the games. Also, it is not typically a male thing to do to lie down and basically give up just when you get hurt and let someone, in this case Katniss, drag you around and through your challenges.
Throughout the story Peeta does do some things that may be considered to be archetypically male but since he is hurt throughout basically the entirety of the book, he is not able to do as many things for himself.


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Sydney Leavitt | 7 comments In the Hunger Games, the person who best describes the female archetype is Effie Trinket. Effie is a typical Capital women, she tries to look young and the same as everyone else. Since she lives in the Capital, she can stay looking young and fashionable with her pink hair and perfect white skin.
Like typical female in our day she over exaggerates when she speaks, "up,up,up! It's gong to be a big, big, big day!" and "I'll get him to the table at gunpoint if necessary!" She always ends a sentence with an explanation point to make it seem like she is always super excited!
She also has a softer side like most females, "and it's just because your from District 12, thats no reason to ignore you." She feels pity for those that don't have much like when a women sees a homeless animal on the sidewalk they feel sad and helpless because they can't do anything.
Like most older women, she is very strict with manners. When Peeta and Katniss are eating on the train, they purposefully shove as much food in their faces to bother Effie because they know she is disgusted by people wiht no manners. Also, she is very lady-like, she is instructed to help Katniss before the games to make her look and act more lady-like. "See like this, I'm smiling at you even though you're aggravating me." It was hard for her to teach Katniss because she had never needed to be very lady-like, but Effie knows just the right tricks fixed her up!
Effie embodies the perfect Female archetype with her charm, over exaggeration of words, her soft side and her perfect makeover tips!


message 5: by Genny (last edited Jan 11, 2012 04:47PM) (new) - rated it 5 stars

Genny G | 8 comments In the Hunger Games to me Suzanne Collins makes Cato embrace and show the villain archetype the most.To me the villain archetype shows revenge,heartless,cruel people who in this story is what Cato is.
He has always hated Katniss since the spinning in the dress, her high score in judging and her attention with her "love" for Peeta. Cato is large, mean, and very good with a sword. HE is sneaky and very clever.
Cato has the boy from District 3 reset the bombs to protect their food, but he has done his job to well. When all the food gets blown up the Boy from District 3 tries to calm him down, but the story states "he held him in a tight headlock and jerks his head sharply from side to side." Instantly the bomb goes off. This shows how much Cato can do with his bare hands and how angry he can get when something he wants goes wrong.
When Peeta goes to finish off the girl from District 8 one of the careers say"why dont we just get rid of him now and get it over with?" Catos response is"Let him tag along. Whats the harm? And hes handy with that knife. Besides he's our best chance of finding her."pg162 This shows that Cato uses peeta for his benefits and that that is the only reason why hes letting peeta live. He just wants to find Katniss and kill her.
Cato states on pg.217"When we find her,I kill her in my own way, and no one interferes." THis is a very big villian archetype because generally villians want to kill there enemy by themselves and take the credit, power, and the satisfaction. They usually also want their enemies to suffer.Cato doesnt spare their feelings or really care for anyone or anything.
Towards the end of the book when Cato is down on the ground trying to fight the mutts he is also trying to stay alive because he still hasn't been able to kill Katniss or Peeta. Cato is not willing to give up killing Katniss at all in this book. He knows what he wants and will try anything to get it.
To me Cato shows villain archetype just about every time he is mentioned throughout the book. He has one goal throughout the book and that is to kill Katniss Everdeen. Cato is showing many villain archetype characteristics like he is single minded,highly motivated,not concerned with others,he doesn't mind people suffering or them being in pain and much more. This is how i can tell Cato embraces the villain archetype. Cato is not the only character that embraces archetype many other characters embraces their archetypes for the better or worse as well like Katniss Everdeen,Peeta Mellark, and Effie Trinket.


message 6: by Clarissa (last edited Jan 11, 2012 01:59PM) (new) - rated it 5 stars

Clarissa Lawrence | 9 comments In the book, the Hunger Games , Suzanne Collins challenges readers to define characters in the way that they are embracing or defying the male and/or female archetypes. I am going to be focussing on the main character, Katniss Everdeen and how she defies the natural female archetype of fragile, sensitive and emotional. She rather takes on the male archetype with a protecting, stoic, provider attitude.
Katniss Everdeen is the oldest child in her family, followed by the sweet, young and innocent Primrose. Her father was killed in a mine explosion, leaving them with a small home, barely any money and only their depressed mother to take care of them, which she does a poor job of doing. So instead Katniss became the provider in the family.
In the book Katniss is described as a very stoic young lady. There are many moments when she feels she just can't show her emotions. On page 34 Katniss says "I cannot afford to look upset, to leave this room with puffy eyes and a red nose". Also on page 169 Katniss says " For her sake, i try to look as least desperate as I can", and on page 223 it says " but i can't let my fear show ". I think that this just shows how much she try's to hide her emotions instead of whining and complaining to others like most females do. And she knows that she has to be the stronger person. Throughout the book it also mentions several times how she provides for her family by hunting for food for them so they have something to eat. When she steps in for her sister at the reaping it came across as a very protective move from her, because she would rather suffer than her sibling.
I really enjoyed reading this book and learned a lot about different archetypes and how they can shape the way a character, like Katniss, is portrayed in the story.


Sadie Olson | 8 comments The Hunger Games; one of the most popular books targeted at teens out there on the book shelves. Read for the main purpose of pleasure and thrill, I did not know how complex the characters truly were until asked to pinpoint what archetypes they did and didn't accept, and why. It was a truly eye opening experience, being able to see how much the characters really do relate to us in ways we hardly ever knew.
When asked to analyze text, you need to realize there are many ways it can be done. One of these many ways is through archetype. In order to fully grasp the concept of finding archetype, like we did through our reading of The Hunger Games, you have to know the backround behind it. Over time, people have come to accept the fact that we has human beings have been categorized into vague groups, such as gender. And what comes with being 'stereotyped' is also being judged by what a main majority of the others in your group do. So as time as weathered on, we have archetype what it means to be a female, male, villain, and hero, even if it doesn't necessarily apply to you specifically. And as I made my way through the Hunger Games, I realized that the main character Katniss Everdeen is one who pushes on her gender type much more than others do.
As I first was introduced to the now popular character Katniss, I realized right off the bat of how 'tomboy' she was, even in the first paragraph of the book. "Prim's face is as fresh as a raindrop, as lovely as the primrose for which she was named." With a male outlook on how even her mother and sister looked, and a very masculine way of life, I realized that, although she was a girl, that she could easily pass for a boy any day. Hunting, being the head of the family, and trying hard not to show any vulnerability, Katniss was an easy male archetype in my mind. Which seemed a little awkward for me, considering I knew that there had to be some love involved. But as she pushed on the stereotypical emotional, soft female, I began to notice this pattern in many more characters that surrounded her - such as he love interest Peeta. Even he was a little too pushy on the male archetype for me, which made him seem much more relatable to some people. I found it quite interesting, how Collins played with the idea of gender archetypes to make her fictional characters much more likable - or unlikeable even.
So as i made my way through the fast paced read, I noticed that most of the characters really did play with their archetypes, for better or worse, which made the book much better to read - and easier to apply.


message 8: by Connor (last edited Jan 26, 2012 04:39PM) (new)

Connor Van Leeuwen | 6 comments in the hunger games the character that best describes the general male archetype is Katniss Everdeen. The characteristics of the general male archetype is a provider and a protector. A provider provides for his/her family when they are in need. Katniss shows that she is a protector when her father dies and no one is feeding her family so she decides to hunt for her food to provide for her family.


Chase | 9 comments Suzanne Collins seemed to create a character for every archetype we've studied in class. Peeta really embraced the Female archetype, Katniss, the Male and Hero, and some tributes, like Cato, embraced the Villain archetype. Collins wrote for all of these archetypes, but she really seemed to embrace the Male archetype, especially with Katniss.

The typical male archetype always protects and looks out for his family. He provides money, food, and tries to keep everyone healthy, alive, and happy. Katniss does all of these things, especially when her mother wouldn't. After Katniss' father died, she immediately tried to learn to hunt. She knew that she and the rest of her family would die unless she did something.

Male archetypes often deal with tragedy lightly, not taking things very hard. The archetype always steps up when something goes wrong, and tries to help. Katniss shows all of these traits at a very young age. She doesn't care much about killing, and will freely do it to stay alive. Right at the beginning of the book she shows male traits, talking about how ugly she thinks her cat is, and how she once tried to drown it.

Later in the book, Katniss begins to act more feminine, but only to win the Hunger Games, and not die. All throughout the book Katniss acts like a Male archetype, even when her life depends on her doing the opposite. Collins wrote Katniss's character really well, and really embraces this archetype.


Ashlon Wright | 9 comments The Hunger Games,a book written by Suzanne Collins mainly written for teenagers, has a very explicit, but yet hidden way of showing all types of archetypes. I have chosen to argue the female archetype.

Usually the typical female archetype is that the woman cooks and cleans. In modern days the female archetype is to do all of the above plus also obtain a job and be a supporting factor in the family. The typical male archetype is usually to be the number one supporting factor in a family and provide the food supplies for the family while also having a little help from the female figure in the family.

I saw throughout the book that Katniss, the eldest daughter of the family of three, was a major female factor in her family. Her mother was seriously depressed because of the death of Katniss' father. Then their was Primrose, Katniss' younger sister.

Katniss was suddenly struck, at the age of eleven, with death of her father and had no idea that sooner than she had probably wanted she would be the number one supporting factor in her family or better known as the male archetype. Katniss still had many of the same characteristics of a female, but she was expected to act more as a male figure now that her father was no longer there to help out.

As the book progressed and Katniss went through the Hunger Games she started to bring out her true colors of being a female with all of the makeovers and learning the proper ways of doing things.

I thought that Collins wrote Katniss' character in the views of more of a male character, but yet tried to include the fact that Katniss was actually a female and although most parts were filled with Katniss portraying the male figure Collins did an excellent job at describing to the reader that Katniss did have her soft spots and was most definitely a female.


message 11: by Brooke (last edited Jan 11, 2012 06:18PM) (new) - rated it 5 stars

Brooke Boren | 8 comments The book "The Hunger Games" by Susan Collins both embraces and defies typical male and female archetypes. For Example Katniss throughout the book has both shown archetypes of male and female.

Even from the start of the book Katniss shows strong characteristics of being a male. For example she provides for her family, she also hides her emotions quite frequently like when she said "I can't afford to get upset", and "I swing my legs off the bed and into my hunting boots." Katniss has had to take on the role of her father after he died in the mine explosion.

Even as we progress through the story, compared to other characters Katniss may appear as heartless, motivated, strong, and competetive. Another example is "If she can do it, so can I." All four of those characteristics are more commenly thought of as men antics. Katniss does show her feminine side, but generally at this time of her life she shows more characteristics of a male.


message 12: by Ethan (last edited Jan 11, 2012 07:19PM) (new)

Ethan Bennett | 6 comments In the book the "Hunger Games" By Suzanne Colins I think that she rejects the female archetype for the character Katniss. Yes, at times she embraces the female archetype, but shes does that mostly out of necessity to look good and still she does that very rarely.

Even from the first chapter of the book Katniss shows strong male characteristics being. For example she is the primary provider “I swing my legs off the bed and slip on my hunting boots”. But the only reason she is the primary provider is because her father died in a mining accident. It just goes to show that one incident can affect whether to reject or embrace the normal archetype that society has branded you with.

I think even if her father didn't die she would still probably reject the female archetype. Mostly because of her enviroment, everyday you have to fight to survive. You have to claw and kick just to get your next meal. And that determination to not give up to not have someone else save you but to save yourself usually comes from a male and hero archetype.


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Joseph Ely | 7 comments While reading the hunger games, i found that many of the characters in the book showed strong examples of both female and male archetypes. In this post, i will focus especially on katniss.

Katniss Everdeen, most likely because of her situation, often shows strong male archetype characteristics. This is no doubt due in part to the death of her father. Katniss is always hunting illegally, almost everyday, just to put food on the table to feed her family. This has hardened her personality, making her to be a more tough and independent sort of person. In a typical household, it is the job of a man to provide food for the family, not to mention risk their life hunting to get it. Further embracing the archetype, katniss finds a sport in and enjoys hunting; "i tiptoed through the forest, eagerly awaiting my next kill".

However, katniss occassionaly shows signs of a female archetype. In the heat of the games, sometimes she will break down from her hardened, tough self and reveal a more feminine side. An example is "then i really started to ball". A male, even under stress, often feels obligated to control their emotions and not cry, so as not to show signs of weakness. Katniss in this sentence shows that even she can sometimes let her emotions get the best of her.


Janelle Jacobs | 7 comments To be honest, I have never read a book that is so captivating that I can't put it down until just recently. I read the Hunger Games by Susan Collins which was so incredible... I truly couldn't put it down! I felt like I really got to know the characters and picture them in my head because of the beautifully done description and the way that Susan Collins fit them into archetypes whether they embraced or defied them.

The one character that really caught my attention of how she mostly defied the common teenage girl archetype was Katniss. Katniss is the kind of girl that doesn't really care about how people perceive her and mostly focuses on taking care of her mother and younger sister Prim. "No fancy hair and clothes. Just me, looking like I could be headed for the woods." She rejects female archetype because of how she doesn't really like fancy clothes or dressing up and instead enjoys leaving District 12 for a few hours, going into the woods, getting dirty and shooting animals like squirrels and rabbits for her family to eat.

But some would argue that she also embraces female archetype like when it says "Except when Prim was very sick, then I singed her the same songs she liked as a baby." As we all know, Katniss is extremely protective and nurturing to her little sister Prim since her mother is depressed from their fathers passing. Their mother has kind of zoned out on reality and can barely take care of her children because of her imense sadness. Katniss stepped up and became the leader of the household so that Prim could still have somewhat of a normal childhood. She is just a tremendously strong and caring girl that would do anything for her family and tries to take care of them as best she can. This quote is the only kind of female action described in the book because most guys wouldn't sing lullabies to their younger siblings. Other wise, it only talks about how she hunts and doesn't really like being girly.

This book really was so amazing and I enjoyed every minute of it. It had a good pace and never got boring. Since reading isn't one of my most preferred activities, I think my friends were surprised when I told them I want to read the second and third book! That definitely tells you something.


Paris Kralik | 7 comments "The Hunger Games" by Susan Collins is a terrific model of playing against the rules of basic archetypes. A character that was highlighted in the book as one specific archetype was Cato. Cato was consistenly the villain. He never played the hero archetype in the book. On a personal level with him, I couldn't tell you if im accurate.
In the text you never see Cato as the nice guy. When ever Cato came around he always brought conflicts. This kid acts the part of the villain. In the casting for "The Hunger Games" he is a total babe so i wouldn't nessasarily say he looks like a villain. That could be considered defying the villainous archetype. Throughout the book Collins is constantly defying general archetypes. From one second to the next Katniss is killing, saving, making crafts for dead people, and hunting for dinner. Talk about a constant rollercoster. But Cato is always evil. From the begining where he was very strong and intimidating to in the games at the end where he grabed Peeta so Katniss wouldn't kill him. " Shoot me and he goes down with me," said by Cato when threatening Katniss about Peeta. Cato was very violent in the games, and had no patients what so ever. He was very revengeful when it came to the death of Clove. Cato is just a killing machine. It even says it in the book "Brutal, bloody Cato who can snap a neck with a twist of his arm."
I never realized until now how different Collins idea's are from other writers. She is amazing and I would have to say she most certainly defy's general archetypes. She can make a female character apear male and still the reader can see that character as a female. (vise versa for Peeta) The strongest archetype was Cato as being a Villain in my personal opinion.


message 16: by Ellie (new)

Ellie Carlson | 7 comments "The Hunger Games" by Suzanne Collins has so many different examples of archetypes. All the characters have characteristics from more then one archetype but one stood out to me in particular, Cato. Cato is a participant in the 74th Hunger games as a tribute from District 2 and is the villain archetype the entire time. From training to kill, to killing with no problem. Taking a life is diffidently a villain. Some villains display a heroic actions but Cato never seemed to have those moments. Once Glimmer, Marvel, Clove, Cato, the District 3 boy, the District 4 Female, and Peeta form an alliance, Cato ends up stabbing Peeta in the leg. Peeta is missing after the stab, but Cato does not care and says, "I keep telling you, forget about him. I know where I cut him. It's a miracle he hasn't bled to death yet. At any rate, he's in no shape to raid us." This quote as many examples of the villain archetype. First, only a villain would stab someone. Second, If someone was missing, hurt and at the risk of dying of loss of blood, no person besides a witness would not do anything to help him. Cato forms alliances, but does not care if one is hurt or dies. He almost seems at ease about Peeta being hurt and missing. Many other quotes similar to this appear a lot throughout the book. Cato is diffidently a villain archetype and never the hero. Ever.


Sarah Sheffield | 9 comments "The Hunger Games" by Suzanne Collins, I think, is a perfect example of the playing against and following of archetypes. Suzanne Collins is expert at both embracing and defying archetypes in this story. Although there are times where Susan definately follows the rules and embraces gender archetypes, I believe she is stronger at defying them.
Lets take Katniss, for example. Katniss most definately defys the common female archetype. In fact, when I first started the book I thought by the way she spoke, acted, and dressed, that she was actually a boy. There are many clues that play into Katniss defying the female archetype. Right at the start on page 4 she quotes "I pull on trousers, a shirt, and tuck my long braid into a cap." There's something about trousers and hiding your hair that doesn't scream out female to me. Katniss rejects the common female archetype here, because usually women are more caring about what they look like. They might wear more skirts, or dresses, and most definately want to show off their hair instead of burying it.
Also, on page 133 she says "I press my lips together hoping this will conceal the emotions starting to boil inside of me." This is yet another example of Katniss rejecting the common female archetype by hiding her emotions like a boy would do. Women and female archetypes are more expected and known to be more fragile, sensitive, and open with their emotions. In other words, they're not afraid to cry. Whereas men and the common male archetype are expected and portrayed to be stronger, fighting back and hiding their emotions which is exactly what Katniss is doing.
Yes, there are times in which Katniss embraces the common female archetype, but overall, she rejects it. She is stronger, more driven, more fierce, and more blunt than the common cultural female archetype. Overall, I believe that Suzanne Collins played against Katniss and many other character archetypes in "The Hunger Games". The professional approach to archetypes made "The Hunger Games" much more complex, interesting, and even more relateable.


Ellen Williams | 7 comments Susan Collins book "The Hunger Games" Is a great example of the wide variety of different Archetypes, specifically hero and villain. The main character Katniss Everdeen is more commonly known to be the hero but, is the just because the readers grows more attached to her so they automatically make her a hero? I feel she better portrays the villain archetype.
When entering the hunger games Katniss's first priority is to hide and stay alive, but the further you enter into the text Katniss becomes stronger and falls into the blood thirsty atmosphere of the games. Katniss befriends and teems up with a young 12 year old girl named Rue. But when Rue is killed Katniss quickly takes revenge on then boy who took her life. When Katniss receives a bow she thinks "If Cato broke through the trees right now I wouldn't flee I'd shoot, I'm actually anticipating the moment with great pleasure." Sure in the games everyone must embrace their evil side to survive but examples of her villains ways are shown before she enters the hunger games, such as trying to drowned her sisters cat, and holding a grudge and not being able to forgive her mom from when she became depressed and couldn't take care of them after the death of their father.
Katniss has most of the characteristics that make up the villain archetype such as, She has a troubled past, She may find joy in killing, She is determined to get what she wants, she breaks rules, and is short tempered.
Susan Collins did an amazing job writing her characters, she showed that the hero's are not perfect and the villains aren't only evil, she showed we are all human and even though some characters might have more villain archetypes they still will have some heroic ones.


Jordan | 5 comments In the book "The Hunger Games" all of the charecters fit a common archetype. When think of these archeytypes the first that comes to mind would be the common female arcchetype that throught the book most commonly rejected by katniss.
As you continue though the book there are two specific male charectoristics that stick outto me first there is the very strong instinc that she has to protect and to be the strong head of the hoise hold. "I protect Prim in every way I can." Katniss states showing the detemination she has to keep her family safe even if it means putting herself second to them as volinteering as tribute instaedof Prim shows. The second trait is her strong hunting and fighting side. "I pul a arow from my quiver ans send it straight at the gamemakers table" This just shows the confidents that she has in heer hunting or in her aim which she has developed aftermany years of hunting for food.
Even though Katniss shows a strong male archetype she ocasionaly falls back on the female archetype. Through the games she shows her female side by decorating Rue aftrer her tragic death or when she twirls in the amazing dres Cinna had prepared for her interview.This shows that everyon eis not just one archetype. Each person can b ehis ornher own variety. As Katniss is throughout the book.


message 20: by Eden (last edited Jan 11, 2012 09:22PM) (new) - rated it 5 stars

Eden Brush | 8 comments The popular novel by Suzanne Collins, "The Hunger Games", is the perfect example of characters embracing and rejecting their common and cultural archetypes. Over time, different character archetypes have evolved including general gender archetypes (male and female), the hero archetype, and of course, the villain archetype. In the now very popular novel targeted at young adults, Cato, the Career from District 2, repeatedly embraces the villain archetype. Cato's constant yearning for power and control, his tendency to attract conflict, and most importantly his heartless, cruel mind makes for the archetypical villain.

Suzanne Collins does a wonderful job of mixing up the common archetypes. We had Kastniss embracing and defying the gender archetype of female at times while we also had Cato embracing the villain archetype. This definitely made for an interesting read. When asked if Collins is more likely to embrace or defy the archetype of the villain, I would say that she probably would embrace it based on the overall storyline of the book and especially Cato's actions. In "The Hunger Games", two tributes from each district of Panem are put in an arena to fight each other to death. Just thinking about it sounds like a villainous phenomenon. Cato is a large, mean, and skilled fighter who has been training for the Hunger Games his whole life. From the get go, he has always had a strong dislike of Katniss especially when Peeta declared his undying love for her. Many times throughout the text Cato displays a prominent villain archetype. For example on page 162 when Cato sees no harm in letting Peeta join the Careers, he exclaims, "besides [Peeta's] our best chance of finding her." he is referring to Katniss Everdeen. Cato is extremely single-minded... his focus is to kill Katniss, all else is basically secondary. Cato's motivation is almost unbelievable and he can't stand being conquered. When Katniss saw Cato's reaction to all of the Careers supplies and food being completely ruined by the mines her reaction was, "-so people really do tear out their hair and beat the ground with their fists-". Plus when Clove's life brutally came to its end, all Cato could think about was revenge. Almost every single time the name Cato is brought up in the book, it has something to do with the villain archetype. Although Cato's charisma and persuasion had won the hearts of the Careers, Cato still only had one goal which was to win the Hunger Games... and to kill Katniss Everdeen.

I would most certainly say that Suzanne Collins defies the general archetypes by challenging the readers to really think about the characters. With Katniss almost always embracing the male archetype, Peeta quite often embracing both gender archetypes, and Cato continually embracing the villain archetype, Collins did a wonderful job of defying the common and cultural archetypes which in my opinion, made the book even better.


Jesse (JesseReed) | 3 comments In the Hunger Games i would say that Peeta is a hero archetype but also a bit of female archetypes. he shows his female side in chapter for when haymitch tells peeta to show a bruise he has on his face because the audience will think who have fought other before the games have started. Peeta says to haymitch "Thats against the rules," (pg. 57) he is so worried about getting in trouble and being the goody good. He doesnt want to do anything that would cause trouble. most boys would be more manly and want to pick a fight and show they are strong and courageous. but Peeta is different and collins wants us to see that. she is having peeta regect what most boys and and be something different.

He shows his hero side when he is working with the carriers becasue he is really leading them away from where Katniss is when the carriers think he is leading them to her. At one point peeta comes back after katniss had dropped the tracker jackers on the carriers and katniss is supposed to be gone but is still there. He sees katniss and yells at her saying "What are you still doing here?" "get up!" he saved her life because cato was coming and would have killed her. (pg. 193) Peeta saved her and he truly does love and care about her. he is a hero. he doesnt want katniss to get hurt and does all he can to protect her. i think with this he embraces the normal more because if a boy was in love with a girl they would do what they could to protect her. he stood out a little and cared very much.


message 22: by Nate (new)

Nate Leishman | 10 comments To begin, we have been examining villain, hero, and gender archetypes in the book, " the Hunger Games" by Susan Collins. The book is loaded with different characters the embrace and defy the general archetype that they are expected to follow, but I will choose one to focus on and explain my reasoning behind why that I think they embrace or defy the common archetype.
I will be examining the archetype of Katniss Everdeen. I feel that Katniss definatley defies the general female archetype. For example, in the beginning of the book many readers ( including myself ) believe Katniss to be a boy! She tries to conceal her emotions and to stay strong so that others around her believe that she is strong And powerful, which was crucial for her survival in the games. Like on page # 80, many of the contestants have become wrapped up in the glamour of the Capitol and the ceremonies but Katniss says, " this has reminded why we are really here. Not to model flashy costumes and eat delecasies but to die a bloody death.". She is showing her strength and masculinity by seeing the truth behind why they are really where they are, and embracing the fact that the chances are good that she will die and is not showing fear or emotion in doing so.
Later in the book Katniss is showing another emotion, but one that can be quite typical in the male archetype, anger and frustration. On page # 135 Katniss is yelling at Peeta and Haymitch for what she thought was embarrassing her in their interviews. Peeta had announced his love for her and she is angry because she believed she looked weak!! She says," Peeta made me look week out there!!" and pushes him into a plant where his hands are injured. She hated the fact that her opponents might find her weak because of something he said and she can't stand him for doing this. You don't generally think of the female archetype as one to become angry and hurt others around them and so Katniss is greatly going against the female archetype in doing so.
I think the normally, the female archetype is fearful, so because Katniss is a female you would think she would act the part, but no. Death is a scary thing to anyone, but you might not expect a male (male archetype) to show this fear and vice versa with the female archetype, but not Katniss. On page # 167 Katniss says, " it's alright here, and ok place to die.". She is embracing death and not running from it or hiding in fear. She accepts it which in my opinion is following more of the male archetype and is defying the female one.
And so that is why that I think that Katniss greatly defies the gender archetype of female.


message 23: by Nate (new)

Nate Leishman | 10 comments ( continuing from other post) believe that Katniss is defying the gender archetype of female, and is embracing the common male archetype.


Nathan Burt | 8 comments A character with the archetype of a villain will always be enemies with the protagonist or hero in a story. A villain likes to cause trouble and is mean to others, and will often be powerful.

In the beginning of the book Peeta Melark embraces the archetype of a villain because he always seemed against and would fight with Katniss. Katniss always thought that when Peeta was being nice he was just trying to get her to fall for his strategy which was to make Katniss fall in love with him so it would be easier for him to win the hunger games.

For example on page 72 when Peeta compliments Katniss about her appearance and Katniss says to herself “Don’t be so stupid Peeta is planning how to kill you” “he is luring you in to make you easy prey”. Another example further into the story when they are in the games, Peeta joins the careers. “ I almost fall out of the tree, the voice belongs to Peeta”, to Katniss this move in Peeta’s strategy was a punch in the face.


Fernando Tepox | 7 comments To be honest I wasn't all excited about reading the Hunger Games again, but I did enjoy reading and writting down the different archetypes for each characters.

The book was filled with rich archetype but i have to say that one in general stood out the most and that would be when the reaping happened to choose who went to the hunger games. Katniss Everdeen embraced the male archetype, I believe this to be true because towards the end of the Hunger Games Katniss finally finds Peeta Mellark which is supposibly her love in the Hunger Games. There's a image in my mind that attracts me into believing that she embraces the male archetype and in page 259 there's this simple words that make me believe that she's a male "Come on. You can do this." I don't think that in our modern culture females would be as motivated to help someone out, sure they do motivate you in some occations but through out history men are usually the one's that motivate you into doing certain stuff but I can be corrected, but that's just how I see it and that's also my choice for giving Katniss Everdeen the male archetype.


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Brigham | 7 comments Archetypes are patterns or themes that recur in different texts across an extended period of time. In class we discussed the male, female, hero, and villan archetypes while reading the Hunger Games by Susan Collins.

One specific archetype that Susan Collins really focused on was how Katniss portrayed the characteristic of a provider. she showed that Katniss could defy the common male archetype of being a provider for thier families. One example of this is when she hunts for her mother and sister every morinig so they don't starve. Another great example of this is in the games when she goes hunting so she can feed peeta and help him recover.

As the book goes on Katniss realizes that to win the Hunger Games she must start to accept typical female archetypes. Katniss has been living her life doing things that males often do to protect and provide for their families. And now she has to shift just a little to help herself out in the games. For example in training facility she wears dresses to dinner and the interviews. Normal males don't wear dresses so this is a good example of katniss accepting the female archetype of wearing dresses and it helps Katniss in the games tremendously.

In conclusion throughout the book Katniss definatley portrays the typical male archetype more than the female one. Regardless the fact that she is a girl.


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Justin | 7 comments I will be argueing that Suzanne Collins likes to defy a charecters archetype more often then not in the novel, Hunger Games.I think Collins is alot more likely as a writer to have a charecter defy his or her archetype.

A great example would be the charecter Katniss. Right in the beging of the book on page 5 it states that she is going hunting to keep food on the table for her family. This would be embracing a male archetype if she was a boy. But Katniss is a girl which a female archetype wouldn't most likely do. A female archetype expecilly as young as Katniss is would probably never take the fatherly role that is being described as Katniss daily routine.

To close my arguement that Suzanne Collins defies most of her charecters archetypes would be a true statement in most peoples eyes. In the book sometimes a villan would do a decent deed while a hero would do a villanous act. Or a female would do male actions and a male would act a little femine.


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Emma Smid | 9 comments In the book "The Hunger Games" by Susan Collins she both embraces and defies the commom cultural female and male archetypes. Katniss in this story rejects the female archetype in some parts of the story but in other parts she embraces the cultural female archetype. She is very caring on the inside for her family and she cares for Rue during the games but sort of rough around the edges where she can kill an animal and feel nothing, or kill the guy that kills Rue and feel pleasure that she knows she won.
But then you see Peeta and Gale and they both show the male archetype the entire book. They are both very strong and aggressive. Gale doesnt really show much empathy for the animals he is killing. They both work and provide for the family. Both Peeta and Gale seem to be very brave. From these characteristics I feel that they both embrace the common cultural male archetype.
There are a few more characters that I feel defy the common archetype. One is Cinna, he wears make-up and is a designer, he can carry out long conversations which in my experience some guys have trouble with. The there is Caesar Flickerman, in the book on page 125 is says "This year, Caesar's hair is powder blue and his eyelids and lips are coated in the same hue." In our culture men dont wear this much make up let alone any make up in general.
My closing statement is Suzanne Collins both embraces and rejects the common cultural archetypes but she is kind of leaning more towards defying the usual. I think this make her writing very interesting and unpredictable to read which is why so many people seem to enjoy this book.


Parker Winchester | 8 comments Reading Hunger Games before, I had a pretty good understanding of the plot and actual events in the story. But I had never really thought about the complex archetypes that collins throws into this thrilling story.
My first time reading the book I payed close attention to the character katniss, the way the story started out, prim and mother in one bed katniss in the other looking over and protecting them, made mt immeadiatly came to the conclusion that katniss was a male character. With my thoughts planned out it was no supprise to me when katniss went out hunting. Not until the moment in the book where it explained that katniss had no romantic feelings for Gale had it ever crossed my mind that katniss was acctually a girl. The reason I was not able to concider the fact that this character could potray either genders, is because of the strong archetypes we are familiar with,when it comes to male and female. Not knowing what an archetype was at the time I didn't pay much attention to it. But know I am able to see the sighs that led me to this type of conclusion. It states "I swing my legs off the bed, and slide int my hunting boots." ok so this character is a hunter a general archetypal feture for a man. This is a part of the story when the auther suzanne Collins defys the common archetype. But there is other parts in the story where she embraces this idea of "common"

Peeta Is a male character but throughout the book he changes archetypes when he confesses his love to katnisshe is defying the male archetype by doing something more female, but when he saves katniss in the games he is acting in a general manly way. So overall Collins embraces and defys archetypes in the book, but I think if we look at all the classic storys out there this is one that deffeinetly defys the archetypes, and thats wat makes it so interesting to read.


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Jen G | 5 comments Suzanne collins is known to writing tight gripping stories like Stephen King, Entertainment Weekly Review mentioned "[The Hunger Games] is a violent, jarring, speed-rap of a novel that generates nearly constant suspense...I couldn't stop reading." Suzanne collins absolutely embraces all archetypes this book contains, she does a good job at it. But she is also amazing at defying it. For example the fact that there are some people who thought that Peeta was a bit girly and weak when he was saying goodbye to his parents is because in most people mind that is how a girl is portrayed to act (but obviously people don’t know how tough us girls can be). The way Peeta cries (p 48 last paragraph) is a good example of how she is defying the male archetype of a general male. In the other hand Katniss is portrayed tough and a bit manly because she is able to “suck it up” and not cry or break very easily she doesn NOT under any circumstances want to look weak neighther. (Pg 48)


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Mary Shelley | 6 comments I would have to say that Suzanne Collins definitely makes Katniss embrace the male archetype. She shows this in many ways throughout the book. A male archetype is aggressive, impatient, and the provider of the family. Katniss is all three of these. She is the provider of her family back in district twelve. She hunts for her family out in the woods so they can survive. Then she has to trade for other stuff at the hob. When Peeta pronounces his love for her, she just shoves him and yells at him that "he made me look weak!". She is a very impatient person. In the games, she was just sitting in a tree doing nothing, and she said that she would rather be out there, killing people. Then after the games were over, she finds herself bound to a hospital bed which she tries time and time again to escape, even though she already knows the outcome of the tried escape, which is passing out. Yet, she has to hold herself back from escaping.


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Sydney (MomoiroKoneko) | 3 comments One of the many attributes of the villain archetype is the way they will use any means to achieve their personal desires, and have generally vengeful motives. Having the goal of personal ascension, be it for money, status, power, or just recognition, is usually a role fulfilled by the villain. Another role, the role of being unable to let go of things and seek revenge by inflicting pain, emotional and or physical, is also fulfilled by the villain. These archetypical attributes are not only seen in the designated "villain" of the novel though, as the author Suzanne Collins so artfully displays in the Hunger Games with the character Katniss Everdeen.

Katniss Everdeen embraces the villain archetype multiple times throughout the novel, defying her more commonly regarded archetype as the hero. The way that she relishes the thought of taking revenge for Rue's death leads her more into the realm of the villain, showing the way that she holds grudges and wishes to avenge them as the general archetype would imply for a darker character. More than once she also mentions the way that she needs to win and even drugs Peeta to achieve her personal desire of retrieving the supply backpack. Even though her motives aren't completely sinister, she does them deliberately against the warnings and wishes of those around her, making her motives slightly selfish and more for her own personal gain than what what would make everyone else happy. The previously stated characteristics are all a part of the villain archetype and make Katniss less of a hero than many would be led to believe.


Jackycoo | 6 comments (Michal) The characteristics of the male archetype are conquering and providing, men need to provide for their family,they feel its their duty to take care of the ones they love instead of the other way around. They also have the need to conquer, men want to conquer their emotional feelings, you usually see the female archetype crying instead of the male archetype, this is because they feel they need to conquer it. Suzanne Collins made the character Katniss Everdeen embrace the male archetype instead of the female archetype in The Hunger Games.
Katniss Everdeen shows sign of the male archetype many times, throughout the novel,"This is upsetting me and I dont want to cry.When they televise the replay of the reapings tonight, everyone will make note of my tears, and I'll be marked as an easy target. A weakling. I will give no one that satisfaction." Katniss does not want to be seen vulnerable like the female archetype she is conquering to hold in her feelings. An example of providing would be "I swing my legs off the bed and slide into my hunting boots." She goes out hunting to bring home food and provide for her family.
Suzanne Collins made Katniss embrace the male archetype, by conquering her feeling and providing for her family,theres many more examples of the male archetype in Katniss.


Jackycoo | 6 comments (Michal) An archetype is a pattern or theme that recur in different texts across an extended period of time. These patterns are seen in myths,literature,movies,T.V, folklore,dreams and rituals. In literature they are found in the use of character types. One archetype is the general male archetype,the characteristics of the male archetype are conquering and providing. Men need to provide for their fdamily, they feel its their duty to take car of the ones they love instead of the other way around. They also have the need to conquer, men want to conquer their emotional feelins, you usually see the female archetype crying instead of the male archetypye, this is because they feel they need to conquer it. Suzanne Collins made the character Katniss Everdeen embrace the male archetype instead of the female archetype in the fantastic book The Hunger Games.
Katniss Everdeen shows sign of the male archetype multiple times throughout the novel, When Katniss' little sister is crying for her to not go Katniss shows that she wants to conquer her emotional feelings: "This is upsetting me and I dont want to cry. When they televise the reply of the reapings tonight, everyone will make note of my tears, and I'll be marked as an easy target. A weakling. I will give no one that satisfaction." Katniss does not want to be seen vulnerable like the female archetype, she is conquering to hold in her feelings. Katniss also shows the male characteristic of providing:"I swing my legs off the bed and slide into my hunting boots." She goes out hunting in the woods to bring home food and provide for her family.
Suzanne Collins made Katniss reject the female archetype and embrace the male archetype, by conquering her feelins and providing for her family, there are many more examples of the male archetype in Katniss in The Hunger Games.


message 35: by Genny (last edited Jan 20, 2012 05:56PM) (new) - rated it 5 stars

Genny G | 8 comments An archetype is a repeating pattern or theme that occurs in different texts across an extended period of time. These are seen in many types of work such as literature,movies,myths and much more. Different kinds of archetype are Hero,Villain,Gender male, and Gender Female.
The Villain archetype characteristics are poeple who are violent, single minded,and want sastisfaction of people suffering and power. In the novel"The Hunger Games" Suzanne Collins makes Cato embrace the villain archetype throughout the book.
Cato is constantly focusing on trying to get Katniss and kill her. It states in the book"Let him tag along. Whats the harm? And hes handy with that knife. Besides hes our best chance of finding her."pg162. His one goal by the end of the games is for himself to kill Katniss and to be the last one standing. Cato will do anything he can to get what he wants. He doesn't care for other people who aren't in his alience or what they are up to he just has one main focus throughout the book.
Cato is violent.He kills anyone who gets in his way.
He stays up late with the careers trying to find anyone last minute. In the novel it states"He held him in a tight headlock and jerked his head sharply from side to side." Instantly a bomb goes off. This quote shows how much he can do without a weapon and what he can do with his bare hands. It also states"I know where I cut him.Its a miracle he hasn't bled to death yet.","I can kill better with my sword." With or without a weapon he has the strength to kill someone easily without having to put up a big fight.
Cato doesn't mind killing people, injuring them, or bother helping them if they are hurt. "When we find her, I kill her in my own way, and no one interferes."pg 217. This means that he wants her to die slowly and to suffer pain in the way that he wants her to. Cato didn't mind cutting peetas leg and didnt care that he was out their bleeding till death with no one to help him and not being able to get very far without making lots of noise. Cato is the leader of his formed aliance and is satisfied that they will all listen to him knowing that if they dont he will turn against them and that they will be his next target.
Suzanne Collins did an absolute great job on showing archetype throughout the book. Not only did she make Cato embrace the Villainous archetype but she showed it in many other characters like Katniss Everdeen, Peeta Mellark,and Effie Trinket.


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Emma Smid | 9 comments In the Hunger Games, Collins goes away from what is commonly known, by assigning Katniss Everdeen the aspects a male archetype would portray. An archetype is a pattern or commonly used text that helps us get a deeper understanding of the characters. The two main characteristics displayed are provider, where she is hunting, gathering and bringing in money to provide for her family. Then she is the protector of her family, she protects Prim by only allowing her to put in her name once for the reaping.
Throughout the book Katniss embracing the commonly known male archetype. She has the competitive nature to her that most men have. On page 34 Katniss says, "Crying is not an option." this quote shows that she is trying to control and conquer her emotions, instead of showing her true emotions and becoming vulnerable. In this way she rejects the female archetype.
In this book I enjoyed how Collins played with what was known and she changed it up a bit, this made the book unforgettable and one of my favorites.


Chase | 9 comments Suzanne Collin's characters in The Hunger Games all embrace different archetypes, most of which we discussed in class. These archetypes are patterns and themes that reoccur throughout time, showing up in movies, myths, and literature. Every character in her book seemed to identify with some sort of general archetype, each one with very different personalities. The most prominent archetype that Collins showed was the male archetype, specifically, the provider and protector. This archetype showed up in many characters, but most of all in the protagonist, Katniss Everdeen.

Katniss, a 16-year old girl, gives herself the responsibilities of a father. She takes care of, and provides for her family, because she has no father to do that for her. She dealt with the tragedy of his death lightly, as most male characters do. She immediately sees her family's need after his death, and goes to get food and money. A male archetypical character will, no matter what, find ways to provide, just as Katniss does.

A 16-year old girl is often not concerned about how to find food for their family and how to help keep other people alive. That is Katniss's whole life, her struggle to keep her family well fed and happy. She will not let her loved ones be hurt, as their protector. It is strange that young girl would step into her father's shoes after his death but Katniss would not allow anymore death in her family.

Katniss greatly embraces almost every characteristic of the male archetype. She is a provider and protector, yet she is a warrior. She shows this in the Hunger Games, showing that she can shoot with deadly accuracy with nearly any bow. At home, she shows it through hunting, in order to provide for her family. She shows the traits of the male archetypical warrior, seen time and time again in history. She never gives up, and will do whatever is necessary to stay alive.

Katniss embraces and identifies with many of the male characteristics, and shows her male traits over and over again in The Hunger Games. She is a hunter and provider. She protects her family, and she is a warrior. She shows many characteristics of the male archetype, and I think Collins really wrote the character and archetype well.


Clarissa Lawrence | 9 comments The general male archetype is protective and providing. An archetype is a pattern or theme that recur in different texts across an extended period of time. Males take on the responsibility of protecting their family, peers, communities etc. They also provide for their families by working for the money to live, and hunting for food. Throughout the novel the Hunger Games, Susan Collins portrays Katniss Everdeen as having a general male archetype.
In the book the Hunger Games, Katniss is described as a very protective young lady. A good example of this is when during the Reaping, Katniss, volunteers as tribute so that her younger sister Primrose doesn't have to get into the games. Katniss is also a provider in her family because she goes out and hunts out in the wild everyday. I really enjoyed reading the hunger games because of how well Susan Collins made Katniss defy the normal female archetype and took on the general male instead.


Clarissa Lawrence | 9 comments The general male archetype is protective and providing. An archetype is a pattern or theme that recur in different texts across an extended period of time. Males take on the responsibility of protecting their family, peers, communities etc. They also provide for their families by working for the money to live, and hunting for food. Throughout the novel the Hunger Games, Susan Collins portrays Katniss Everdeen as having a general male archetype.
In the book the Hunger Games, Katniss is described as a very protective young lady. A good example of this is when during the Reaping, Katniss, volunteers as tribute so that her younger sister Primrose doesn't have to get into the games. Katniss is also a provider in her family because she goes out and hunts out in the wild everyday. I really enjoyed reading the hunger games because of how well Susan Collins made Katniss defy the normal female archetype and took on the general male instead.


Ashlon Wright | 9 comments There are many ways to describe what an archetype is. Some people may call it a prototype. It is a pattern in which a certain characteristic is repeated and can be catorgized as an archetype. A few of the most common archetypes would have to be the villian archetype, the hero archetype, or the general male and female archetype. There are also a few archetypes besides these four, but right now they're not important.

There are many different characteristics for the gerneral female archetype. Usually they are generous, loving, understanding, nurturing, emotional, and more. In this case Katniss, a young 16 year old girl in the book "The Hunger Games", was more of a male character by the fact that she was the main provider for her family after her father passed, she was very into the whole hunting scene, and she rarely had ever shown the female side of her. Mind the fact that she was the main provider and had more male characteristics she was also very femanine in different ways.

Through Katniss' journey in the games and at the arena she was definetly starting to show a lot more of her femanine side. In the book when Peeta said "From the day we met" and he was refuring to the day he fell in love with her, Katniss was fluttered and started to realize that at that moment she too had started to feel for Peeta.

Right then Katniss started to show the female side of herself.

Suzanne Collins, the author, tried to show the way a young girl with very male like characteristics could change dirastically with one statment from a young boy of her age. Collins did an excilent job at explicitly showing how Katniss can make such a difference in such a short time.


Brooke Boren | 8 comments The characteristics of Katniss that Suzanne Collins made her portray are, the provider, protector, and conquerer. Which fall into the category of the male archetype. Katniss has had the responibility of these things given to her ever since her father died and her mother was no longer fully there. Suzanne Collins really shows Katniss differently than you might expect.
For example at the beginning of the book Collins decides to not give Katniss' name so one might think the antics she was displaying was one of a mans. Of course Katniss still shows the side of the women archetype, but generally she displays those of a males.


Janelle Jacobs | 7 comments While reading, thinking, and analyzing the book the Hunger Games by Suzanne Collins, most people concluded that Katniss Everdeen defied the common teenage girl archetype. "Wait... hold on!" you might be saying to yourself right now. "What's archetype??" Archetype is patterns or themes that recur in different texts across an extended period of time. Archetype is the observations and studying of human’s actions and personalities that fit them into a certain category, from princesses to villains to heroes to male and female archetypes. All princesses are hyper feminine, sweet and sensitive whereas villains are vicious, evil and will do anything to get what they desire. Heroes are brave, determined and dedicated to the task given. But the one archetype that I will be talking to you about today is the male archetype that happens to possess the characteristic of being stoic and protective.
When Katniss was a young eleven year old girl, her father tragically passed away due to a mine explosion. She took over as leader of the household and continually made sure there was food on the table, which put her hunting skills to good use. She enjoyed escaping District 12 for a few hours, getting dirty and shooting animals like rabbits and squirrels with her bow and arrow for her family to feast upon. Collins rarely revealed Katnisses feminine side and instead presented attributes of being stoic and protective which reflects more of a male. Katniss is extremely protective of her little sister Prim and try’s tremendously hard to give her somewhat of a normal childhood.
When Katniss volunteered to take Prim’s place in the games, she always told herself to not cry and to always stay composed. “Crying is not an option”-pg. 34. She was stoic and didn’t want anyone to think she was a whimp that would be an easy target. She seldom displayed emotion, which again mirrors more of a male quality. Unlike her mother who is absolutely and completely devastated of her father’s passing, Katniss still stays collected, composed and unemotional. She keeps her thoughts and feelings hidden away deep inside for no one to see.
This was a wonderful book and I gained a great understanding of archetype just by analyzing this text. Hopefully, by reading my essay you as well gained a further understanding of archetype and how we can fit characters into them.


Sadie Olson | 8 comments In the popular book, The Hunger Games, the characters all hold certain archetypes close to their harts, the main character Katniss's happening to be the male. Showing that she is a protector and provider, it proves that her main state of mind has been devoted to one of a male's type. Ever since she was a small girl, her whole life had been set to protecting and providing for the small family of two, finding it both challenging and difficult, yet something that Katniss seemed to enjoy. As she goes out and hunts almost daily, it just proves that not only is she a provider, but she is fearless in a sense, almost as if she would do anything to bring back something to support the family. Although, at times, she proves to be a female, a majority of the time is backing up how much of a boy she truly is at heart.


Nathan Burt | 8 comments An archetype is pattern that recurs in text across a period of time. In the book "The Hungar Games" Peeta Melark reflects the archetype of a villain. A character that has the archetype of a villain will: Be enemies with the hero in a story and will manipulate others for power.

In the beginning of the book Peeta Melark embraces the archetype of a villain because he always seemed against Katniss and would argue with her. But other times Katniss always thought that when Peeta was being nice he was just trying to get her to fall for his strategy which was to make Katniss fall in love with him so it would be easier for him to win the hunger games. This behavior of Peeta describes the archetype of a villain. He is the enemy of Katniss who is the protagonist in the story. He is being nice to her which is a good thing, but really he is just trying to help himself.

For example on page 72 when Peeta compliments Katniss about her appearance and Katniss says to herself “Don’t be so stupid Peeta is planning how to kill you” “he is luring you in to make you easy prey”. Another example further into the story when they are in the games, Peeta joins the careers. “I almost fall out of the tree, the voice belongs to Peeta”, to Katniss this move in Peeta’s strategy was a punch in the face.


message 45: by Jordan (last edited Jan 22, 2012 09:27PM) (new) - rated it 5 stars

Jordan | 5 comments In most storys there is a typical female archetype given. This is usualy played by the main female character. In the Hunger Games this female role is not played by the traditional archetype girl. It is played by the strong and protective Katniss who has rejected the female archetype. In the book Katniss is proven to be a protecter and a provider.
Katniss has gone throgh the majority of her life hunting and feeding her family. She spend most of her days in the forest outside her district risking her life to put food on the table for her family. Katniss does everything to protect her mother and sister she can. Even though Katniss risks her life hunting and trading she still barley thinks twice about it showing her protective instinct that proves Katniss to be a perfect deffinition of the male arhetype.
Even though Katniss does have moments where she seems as if she is the most typical female she is a great example of a male archetype throughout the majority o the book.


Sarah Sheffield | 9 comments The inherited pattern of thought or symbolic imagery derived from the past collective experiences and present in the individul unconscious, that we call "archetypes" are commonly found in the novel The Hunger Games. Archetypes of general male, general female, hero, and villian can all be prominantly found in this book, but the specific archetype I would like to focus on is the general male archetype. The general male archetypcal patterns of being the provider and protector are emphasied specifically in Katniss Everdeen.


Sarah Sheffield | 9 comments (Please ignore my last post. This is the correct one.)
The inherited pattern of thought or symbolic imagery derived from the past collective experiences and present in the individul unconscious, that we call "archetypes" are commonly found in the novel The Hunger Games. Archetypes of general male, general female, hero, and villian can all be prominantly found in this book, but the specific archetype I would like to focus on is the general male archetype. The general male archetypcal patterns of being the provider and protector are emphasied specifically in Katniss Everdeen.
When you think of the patterns that often appear in the general male, you often might think of strength and being a provider and protector. The insecure, vulnerable, and fragile persona of the general female archetype is durastically rejected with Katniss Everdeen. Her skill with hunting especially shows her motivation and drive to be the protector and provider of her family. She desperately trys and will do anything to make sure her family is safe and well fed.
I think that women have often had the patterns of being more motherly and nurturing while the males are the ones out hunting, suffering with their strength to give everything and anything they can to their families. I think that Katniss shows the strength and motivation to be the protector and provider that the general male archetype generally follows and embodies.
Sure there are times when males can be emotional and vulnerable too. But the general male archetype shows the prominant patterns I'd strength, providing, and protecting all throughout history. This leaves me to the conclusion that Katniss Everdeen rejects the common female archetype and embraces the general male, in the book the Hunger Games. Her qualities of being the provider and protecter are red lights blinking to show us that she definately isn't your typical girl.


message 48: by Eden (last edited Jan 22, 2012 10:33PM) (new) - rated it 5 stars

Eden Brush | 8 comments The novel by Suzanne Collins, "The Hunger Games", is the perfect example of characters embracing and rejecting their common and cultural archetype. An archetype is a pattern or theme that recurs in different texts over an extended period of time. There are many different kinds of archetypes including character archetypes. One attribute of the general archetypal villain is single-mindedness. Cato, from District 2 in "The Hunger Games", assumes the quality of single-mindedness by being determined to kill Katniss Everdeen and win the Hunger Games. With single-mindedness comes focus. The author plays with the villain archetype and gives Cato various characteristics and motives, particularly narcissism and single-mindedness that portray the archetypal villain.

Cato is most certainly the villain in "The Hunger Games". The villain's focus is quite often their only goal... all else is fundamentally secondary. In the novel, while characters were being killed and severely injured, Cato could care less. All he cared about was killing Katniss, making all else insignificant. This also shows his narcissistic side by being too self-absorbed to care about the pain and suffering of others. Although right away you could tell that Cato was a villain, as the novel progressed, his villainous gestures and actions became considerably apparent. From the very start, Cato has had hostility towards Katniss, the tribute from District 12. When she received an exceptionally high score during training up until when Peeta Mellark proclaimed his undying love towards her, Cato's hate grew. Cato is obviously very single-minded, especially when it comes to his crucial goal, to win the Hunger Games, and of course... kill Katniss Everdeen.

Cato, the Career from District 2, embodies the common and cultural villainous archetype by illustrating many of the same motives. Still, the most prominent aspect of the villain archetype would be Cato's single-mindedness towards killing Katniss. For example, on page 162, when he sees no harm in letting Peeta join the Careers, he exclaims... "Let [Peeta] tag along. What's the harm? And he's handy with that knife. Besides he's our best chance of finding her."... He is referring to Katniss. Cato assumes that if Peeta is with him and the rest of the Careers, then Katniss will become weaker. He only lets Peeta live because it is beneficial to him, showing his narcissistic tendencies yet again. Towards the end of the novel when he is about to get eaten alive by the 'Capitol's mutts' he can't bear the thought of Katniss surviving, let alone winning the Hunger Games.

The character Cato exhibits the archetypal villain in numerous ways particularly his single-minded goals and selfish mind that yearns for the satisfaction of the death of others.


Fernando Tepox | 7 comments In the book the " The Hunger games"Suzanne Collins defies all aspects of the female archetype.
Her character Katniss Everdeen is embracing the male archetype because she's supporting her family, providing food and shelter. Over extended period of times thue male model has been played by the "provider ". This person has to meet all the aspects that i have listed, well at least that's how it's been over the course of time. It's funny how the characters evolve through the book, first of all the first chapter I thought that Katniss was a guy but then she turns into a female but then again she changes and when they kill Rue she kills the tribute that killed Rue and feels a sense of a good feeling then she turns into a villain, and finaly toward the end of the book she finds Peeta and becomes a hero by helping Peeta recover from all his wounds and feeding him. I just love how Suzanne Collins has the ability to change a characters purpose or archetype into another.


Ellen Williams | 7 comments In Suzanne Collins book "The Hunger Games" The Main character Katniss Everdeen is a great example of embracing the Villain archetype. She has some of the same traits shown in the villain archetype such as, She Finds pleasure in harming others.

People might argue that she didn't have a choice she had to go in the game and kill others to survive. This is a completely valid argument, but, When Katniss got the bow and arrows she said "If Cato ran towards me right now i wouldn't run, i would shoot, in fact I'm looking forward to that moment." Also earlier in the book she is angry and ashamed and the actions Peeta is showing and says "I will watch eagerly in the sky for signs of his death if I haven't already killed him myself." These examples show that Katniss embrasses the Villain archetype more then any other.


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