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History Nominations > Dec. 1 - Jan. 1 - Voting

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Emily (Ohmagichour) | 181 comments Here's voting for this month! Please vote for one book and I'll announce the winner on November 20th. I'll post a quick summary of the book, how it's available on Amazon (used, new, Kindle), and publication date. We can start reading on December 1. Can't wait!

#1 - Drums Along the Mohawk by Walter D. Edmonds -available used, new, published 1997

A story of a young couple settling in the Mohawk River Valley in NY during the Revolutionary War; deals with their struggles to settle in the area and dealings with Native Americans.

Drums Along the Mohawk (New York Classics) by Walter D. Edmonds

#2 - Paul Revere's Ride by David Hackett Fischer - available used, new, and Kindle, published 1995

Library Journal: "It is rare when a scholarly history will appeal to a general readership, but such is the case with this book. Part biography of Revere and part history of the battles of Lexington and Concord, it places the "midnight ride" in the broad context of American resistance to Great Britain as just one of many similar actions taken by Revere and others. . . In the process he has written a meticulously researched and wonderfully evocative narrative that will be enjoyed by history lovers and scholars alike."

Paul Revere's Ride by David Hackett Fischer

#3 - Shadowbrook by Beverly Swirling - available used, new, published 2005

Booklist: Swerling turns her attention to mid-eighteenth-century Ohio, where the French and Indian War inflames passions and sparks intrigue in the inhabitants of this richly fertile region. At the center of the story are Quentin Hale, the rebellious younger son of the prosperous Shadowbrook plantation, and Cormac Shea, the son of a Potowatomi woman and an Irish fur trader. Raised together on the plantation, Quent and Corm are caught up in the ever-growing hostilities between the English and the French. . . . This spellbinding historical adventure highlights an often overlooked episode on the road to American independence."

Shadowbrook  A Novel of Love, War, and the Birth of America by Beverly Swerling

#4 - The Winthrop Woman by Anya Seton - available used, new, published 1958, 1971, 2006

From Amazon: First published in 1958 and set in the early 17th century, this bestselling novel follows Elizabeth Winthrop, a courageous Puritan woman who finds herself at odds with her heritage and surroundings. A real historical figure, Elizabeth married into the family of Governor John Winthrop of the Massachusetts Bay Colony. . . . Defying the government and her family, Elizabeth befriends famous heretic Anne Hutchinson, challenges an army captain, and dares to love as her heart commanded. Through Elizabeth’s three marriages, struggles with her passionate beliefs, and countless rebellions, a powerful tale of fortitude, humiliation, and ultimate triumph shines through."

The Winthrop Woman  A Novel by Anya Seton

#5 - The Women of the House How a Colonial She-Merchant Built a Mansion a Fortune and a Dynasty by Jean Zimmerman, available used, new, published (paperback) 2007

Booklist: At the time of her death, in 1691, Margaret Hardenbroeck was reputedly the richest woman in the English province of New York. . . She had amassed an impressive fortune, operated a thriving business as a fur trader, assembled a fleet of sailing vessels, built an impressive real-estate portfolio, and earned a well-deserved reputation as a shrewd she-merchant. Margaret's most important legacy, however, was the example she set for the generations of female descendents who followed in her remarkably independent footsteps."

The Women of the House  How a Colonial She-Merchant Built a Mansion, a Fortune, and a Dynasty by Jean Zimmerman

#6 - A Voyage Long and Strange Rediscovering the New World by Tony Horwitz - available used, new, Kindle, published 2008

Booklist: Pulitzer Prize–winning journalist Horwitz has presented what could be described as a guide for those who are historically ignorant of the “lost century” between the first voyage of Columbus and the establishment of Jamestown in 1607. In this informative, whimsical, and thoroughly enjoyable account, Horwitz describes the exploits of various explorers and conquistadores and enriches the stories with his own experiences when visiting some of the lands they “discovered.” Horwitz writes in a breezy, engaging style, so this combination of popular history and travelogue will be ideal for general readers.

A Voyage Long and Strange  Rediscovering the New World by Tony Horwitz

#7 - Arundel by Kenneth Roberts, available used, new, published 1929, 1995

Amazon: This is the classic series from Pulitzer Prize-winning historical novelist Kenneth Roberts, all featuring characters from the town of Arundel, Maine. Arundel follows Steven Nason as he joins Benedict Arnold in his march to Quebec during the American Revolution.

Arundel by Kenneth Roberts

#8 - The Midnight Ride of Paul Revere by Henry Wadsworth Longfellow, available used, new

From Publisher's Weekly - Fusing scratchboard drawings and computer technology, first-time children's book illustrator Thompson creates a series of ruggedly sleek illustrations for Longfellow's classic poem.

The Midnight Ride of Paul Revere by Henry Wadsworth Longfellow


message 3: by Susanna - Censored by GoodReads (last edited Nov 16, 2008 11:57AM) (new)

Susanna - Censored by GoodReads (SusannaG) | 368 comments I'm going with The Winthrop Woman: A Novel, as it's been siting on Mt. TBR, taunting me. Also, I read Katherine, also by Anya Seton, last year, and really enjoyed it.


Sera | 246 comments My vote is for The Winthrop Woman A Novel. I would like to try an Anya Seton work, because I've heard so many good things about her.


Misfit | 696 comments I'm voting for The Winthrop Woman, although I have already read it (and loved it).


Laura I will pass this time since I am not so familiar with american HF, sorry....


message 7: by Sara W (last edited Nov 17, 2008 09:41AM) (new)

Sara W (SaraWEsq) | 2140 comments I'll go with The Women of the House: How a Colonial She-Merchant Built a Mansion, a Fortune, and a Dynasty although I agree that Anya Seton tells a good story, so if her book wins I'll be equally happy.


Emily (Ohmagichour) | 181 comments It's so hard to pick - I want to read all of these! Great nominations!


MichelleCH (lalatina) | 55 comments My vote is also for The Winthrop Woman. It was very hard to pick with all the great nominations.


Emily (Ohmagichour) | 181 comments Voting closed! We'll be reading #4 - The Winthrop Woman by Anya Seton - available used, new, published 1958, 1971, 2006

Note that the newest version has a forward from ever-controversial Philippa Gregory.

From Amazon: First published in 1958 and set in the early 17th century, this bestselling novel follows Elizabeth Winthrop, a courageous Puritan woman who finds herself at odds with her heritage and surroundings. A real historical figure, Elizabeth married into the family of Governor John Winthrop of the Massachusetts Bay Colony. . . . Defying the government and her family, Elizabeth befriends famous heretic Anne Hutchinson, challenges an army captain, and dares to love as her heart commanded. Through Elizabeth’s three marriages, struggles with her passionate beliefs, and countless rebellions, a powerful tale of fortitude, humiliation, and ultimate triumph shines through."


The Winthrop Woman: A Novel by Anya Seton


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