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Reading Group Challenge for 2012 > Trice's 2012 TBR Challenge List

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message 1: by Trice (last edited Nov 08, 2012 11:56PM) (new)

Trice still not done with my 2011 Challenge List - I always get close but never quite make it it seems. Ah well, here's to another try, and because 3rd time's a charm, I'm putting City of God and the associated (and so to be read after) Secular City on the list again. For the record, this is going to be a weird list. :)




1. The Choice: Global Domination or Global Leadership by Zbigniew Brzezinski 4/30/2012 ****
2. On The Law Of War And Peace by Hugo Grotius
3. Natural Rights and the Right to Choose by Hadley Arkes
4. Politics for Christians: Statecraft As Soulcraft by Francis J. Beckwith 3/27/2012 **
5. Wild Swans: Three Daughters of China by Jung Chang 4/25/2012 ****
6. Power Shift: China and Asia's New Dynamics by David Shambaugh -- currently reading
7. Martin Chuzzlewit by Charles Dickens 4/14/2012 *****
8. City of God by St. Augustine of Hippo currently reading
9. The Secular City: Secularization and Urbanization in Theological Perspective by Harvey Cox
10. The Protestant Ethic and the Spirit of Capitalism by Max Weber 10/06/2012 ****
11. The Power of Babel: A Natural History of Language by John H. McWhorter 3/21/2012 ****
12. Cross-Cultural Servanthood by Duane Elmer 2/14/2012 ****

Alt 1. The Cost of Discipleship by Dietrich Bonhoeffer 8/22/2012 *****
Alt 2. The History of the Peloponnesian War by Thucydides

the alts are books I didn't end up reading for my 2010 list... it's strongly possible this list will change in the next week, but here's the first thought anyway. :)

The Choice  Global Domination or Global Leadership by Zbigniew Brzezinski On the Law of War and Peace by Hugo Grotius Natural Rights and the Right to Choose by Hadley Arkes Politics for Christians  Statecraft as Soulcraft by Francis J. Beckwith Wild Swans  Three Daughters of China by Jung Chang Power Shift  China and Asia's New Dynamics by David Shambaugh Martin Chuzzlewit by Charles Dickens City of God by Saint Augustine of Hippo The Secular City  Secularization and Urbanization in Theological Perspective by Harvey Cox The Protestant Ethic and the Spirit of Capitalism by Max Weber The Power of Babel  A Natural History of Language by John H. McWhorter Cross-Cultural Servanthood  Serving the World in Christlike Humility by Duane Elmer The Cost of Discipleship by Dietrich Bonhoeffer The History of the Peloponnesian War by Thucydides


message 2: by Susan from MD (new)

Susan from MD | 422 comments Wow! That's quite a list -- I'm impressed that you are tackling all of these in the same year.

I haven't read any of these, but am most intrigued by #1, #7, #8, #11 and Alt #1. I started rereading Dickens this year, hence #7 and have always meant to read #8.

I hope you are planning to post short reviews of these, as I would love to hear more about them. Good luck on your challenge!


message 3: by Bill (new)

Bill | 4629 comments Wow, no light reading there. Good luck!


message 4: by Lea (new)

Lea (Leaspot) | 2554 comments I just bought Wild Swans, and have been meaning to read it and The Cost of Discipleship for awhile. None are on my official list, but here's hoping I can get to them this year.


message 5: by Irene (new)

Irene | 102 comments I have read Wild Swans ages ago. I loved it and I finished it rather fast as I got really into the story and just couldn't put it down.


message 6: by Alondra (new)

Alondra | 5452 comments Weird list or not; it's reading!! Yea!!

good luck this year :)


message 7: by Kerri (new)

Kerri I agree with many of the comments above....HEAVY reading, but certainly looks interesting. I read Wild Swans: Three Daughters of China last year and absolutely loved it.....fantastic book. Very impressive list!


message 8: by Emily (new)

Emily Meek (emily_meek) #10 changed my life! I hope you enjoy it!


message 9: by Trice (last edited Feb 01, 2012 02:55AM) (new)

Trice hey guys, thanks for all your thoughts! I've been hearing about Wild Swans for a few years now and finally picked up a copy this past fall - looking forward to getting into it. And hey, I'm always glad of reading company if anyone wants to come along with any of these.

oh, and as for the light reading, I always figure I'll get to that anyway - this is the stuff I enjoy but that I need an extra bit of a push to get to and get through sometimes. :)

Emily, 'changed your life'? do tell!

Susan, any thoughts on Martin Chuzzlewit before I start it? I've only been seriously reading Dickens for the past few years as reading abridged versions in school soured me before I'd really tried him.

Irene and Kerri - anything I should know before I start Wild Swans?

Lea - love to know what you think of both Wild Swans and Cost of Discipleship if/when you get to them!


message 10: by Trice (last edited Feb 01, 2012 02:48AM) (new)

Trice At present I'm finishing up the last couple books from my 2011 list (St. Thomas Aquinas on Politics and Ethics now and, once I finish it, Niebuhr's Moral Man and Immoral Society), along with working my way through Cross-Cultural Servanthood as the 1st one from this year's list. C-CS is not heavy or difficult to understand, but it is humbling (ouch) and is forcing me not to race through but to think about the issues, the questions, and my own sometimes subconscious, sometimes blatant attitudes toward other people (both positive and negative). The thought process, the soul-searching, I've found is definitely applicable to my interactions with others from my culture of origin, as well as with those from other cultures. Did I say ouch? :)


message 11: by Trice (new)

Trice Finished Cross-Cultural Servanthood today and debating between returning it to the person who very kindly lent me her brand new copy (before she read it herself even! now that's generosity! (; ) and rereading it first. So much good stuff. Recommend recommend recommend!

Not sure what's next on this list though as I'm still wading through the Aquinas book (somewhere between 50 and 100 pages left) from my 2011 list and I'm on the verge of a new term - want to read, but I still have lots of prep to do (including some extra job-associated reading): Spring 2012, year of the dragon, here we come! :)


message 12: by Donna (new)

Donna | 436 comments Fascinating list, Trice. Good luck to you! And fascinating life . . . how long have you been in China? I'm replanted in Saudi Arabia.


message 13: by Trice (new)

Trice Donna wrote: "Fascinating list, Trice. Good luck to you! And fascinating life . . . how long have you been in China? I'm replanted in Saudi Arabia."

Hi Donna, and thanks. I've been here about 4 1/2 years - deciding year by year; still love it and still feel completely ignorant... plus it's weird to think of myself as illiterate, but here I truly am. Keep intending to change that, but not quite making it.

Saudi Arabia sounds like quite a trip! How's your Arabic? Have you been there long?


message 14: by Trice (last edited Mar 22, 2012 12:13AM) (new)

Trice Last night I finished The Power of Babel: A Natural History of Language. Overall found it really good, though different from what I initially expected. I did a quickie review that gives a bit of a glimpse, and I would definitely recommend it.

I believe I'll be starting Francis Beckwith's Politics for Christians: Statecraft as Soulcraft, although I'm also hoping to start on Reinhold Niebuhr's Moral Man and Immoral Society: A Study in Ethics and Politics from my 2011 list, as I finished the Aquinas book yesterday afternoon (there was a short Niebuhr essay in the Aquinas book that has added to my eagerness to read a full book). I guess I'll see if I can switch back and forth between these 2. :)


message 15: by Donna (new)

Donna | 436 comments Trice wrote: "Donna wrote: "Fascinating list, Trice. Good luck to you! And fascinating life . . . how long have you been in China? I'm replanted in Saudi Arabia."

Hi Donna, and thanks. I've been here about 4 1..."


I've been in Saudi too long -lol! About 20 years. I'm happy to say I'm pretty good with conversational Arabic, but remedial in reading and writing (as the colloquial is different from the formal).

Looks like some interesting reading you have going there. Did you study political science? My daughter is studying international relations.


message 16: by Trice (new)

Trice Read Politics for Christians: Statecraft as Soulcraft in 1 day (3/27), partly due to 2 extra long bus rides, and posted a review of a rather disappointing read... I'm reconsidering dropping it from 3 to 2 stars, but I'm reminding myself that its last chapter or 2 were the weakest parts and that's what I'm remembering at the moment.

I did end up starting Moral Man and Immoral Society: A Study in Ethics and Politics yesterday on the bus and I've been reading Martin Chuzzlewit for a few days - back and forth on the MC - hilarious 1st chapter, but it's starting to get into some patterns I'm recognizing from other Dickens' books with semi-caricatured characters (try saying that 5 times fast), and I'm thinking I can already see, at least generally, what the fates of some of them will be. But reminding myself that I've loved his writing each time I've read him, and that the books often present a different picture after the whole hath been thoroughly digested. ;)

The Niebuhr is actually a bit depressing so far, even though I'm fairly sure I don't entirely agree with his basic premise. It is so far without any hope for human society... well, no maybe he's started tempering it a bit with 'don't try for a perfect system at either end of the spectrum and we'll all be better off.'

Teaching the whole weekend and, though everyone might think tomorrow is Saturday, here, it's actually Monday, followed by Tuesday, followed by 3 days holiday for Tomb Sweeping Festival - the powers that be (way way way at the top) like to make up for days off. Piles and piles o' grading to catch up on, but hoping I'll be able to take some reading time here and there, and I do have 2 days of bus rides to go. :)


message 17: by Trice (new)

Trice Donna wrote: "I've been in Saudi too long -lol! About 20 years. I'm happy to say I'm pretty good with conversational Arabic, but remedial in reading and writing (as the colloquial is different from the formal).

Looks like some interesting reading you have going there. Did you study political science? My daughter is studying international relations. "


wow! that is quite a bit of time - sounds like home. :) So many questions I'd love to ask about living there, but not sure where to begin or whether they'd be too awkward. Any books you'd recommend that really give an insider's perspective?

I did study Poli Sci, focused internationally, and still have thoughts of wandering back at some point. I'd love to delve deeper into the field full-time.


message 18: by Trice (new)

Trice Finished Martin Chuzzlewit today - can't say the ending surprised me, but, my, it made me sigh - beautiful.


message 19: by Donna (new)

Donna | 436 comments Trice wrote: "Donna wrote: "I've been in Saudi too long -lol! About 20 years. I'm happy to say I'm pretty good with conversational Arabic, but remedial in reading and writing (as the colloquial is different from..."

Hi, Trice. Well, can't say that I've read many books about Saudi. Living here is enough - ha ha! Unfortunately, many of the books are of the sensational about the women's issues, etc. Not belittling those in any way, but I think it's important to get the total picture. KSA is a very complicated country! I did read one book many years ago, when I first came, called The Kingdom by Robert Lacey which I found insightful at the time. I guess he's got a new one out now, Inside the Kingdom, so that might be one I'd recommend. Actually, maybe I should read it, 'cause it would be interesting to see how I would react now that I have the perspective of living here for 20 + years.


message 20: by Donna (new)

Donna | 436 comments Hi, Trice. I was just reminded of another book, Wilfred Thesiger's Arabian Sands which chronicles a journey across the Arabian desert in the late 1940's (a couple decades after the birth of the modern state). A fascinating read and very relevant as a background for the culture of contemporary KSA.


message 21: by Trice (new)

Trice Finished Wild Swans: Three Daughters of China today. It's full of sadness and despair, but mixed with hope. It feels like China.


message 22: by Trice (new)

Trice Finished Brzezinski's The Choice: Global Domination or Global Leadership last night - excelente!! Posted a brief review that's more like my momentary thoughts on the book.


message 23: by Trice (new)

Trice Just finished Bonhoeffer's The Cost of Discipleship - amazing to the end, in imagery and insight. Will be thinking about it for a long time. Hopefully will revisit it in not too long a time. Seems like too much to review, but it's vaguely possible I'll hit a moment of inspiration. ;)


message 24: by Trice (new)

Trice just started Max Weber's The Protestant Ethic and the Spirit of Capitalism - definitely looking like a challenge, and very interesting... can already see the application of thought after reading the intro. we'll see how it goes on. I like his voice so far.

Continuing also with Power Shift: China and Asia's New Dynamics, which is a collection of articles on the titled topic.


message 25: by Mary (Marbear), Founder (new)

Mary (Marbear) (mbeth45) | 10120 comments Mod
Great job so far Trice. I was trying to think if I finished my list in 2011. Pretty sure I did. But I'll tell you a secret. I didn't do the challenge this year. What a bad moderator I am. I got so caught up in "The Game of Thrones Series," I knew there was no way I'd finish another 12 books. The books in that series are so, so long. LOL! I'm half-way done with the fifth book. It will take the writer another 4 years to finish the next book so maybe I can get to some of my other books that are waiting. Happy Reading.

marbear


message 26: by Trice (last edited Sep 13, 2012 11:15PM) (new)

Trice Hey, thanks Marbear!
love that series too - I read the 1st four book the summer before this last and though I now have book 5 I was debating rereading the other ones when I realized in a convo with a friend that I'd forgotten half the characters' names... although I'm really not sure i want to reread through the agonizing events that happened to Robb and his mother. one of those things you could sort of see coming, but wanted to be untrue.

I'm really wanting to finish a list in the time limit since I haven't the last couple years. It's still good to get to the books anyway, but it'd be nice to make the time... although I've just gotten a bunch more books to distract me too. :)

Enjoy dancing with the dragons! :)


message 27: by Trice (new)

Trice And, Emily, I don't know if you will read this, but I'm starting to get the 'changed my life' thing with the Weber book. I've already had a few 'no way!' moments... wanting to look around for a good bio of Luther, but there's just a lot here i want to look into further in terms of what he's saying about the Biblical basis or lack thereof for some of the ideas we tie to Luther or to later parts of the Reformation


message 28: by Mary (Marbear), Founder (new)

Mary (Marbear) (mbeth45) | 10120 comments Mod
Trice wrote: "Hey, thanks Marbear!
love that series too - I read the 1st four book the summer before this last and though I now have book 5 I was debating rereading the other ones when I realized in a convo with..."


Hi Trice. I loved Catelyn and Rob. Do not want to post any spoilers so I won't see more. There are just so many characters that I know I won't remember some of the minor ones. You can finish the challenge. Last year I finished at the last minute. Didn't think I'd make it.

marbear


message 29: by Trice (new)

Trice I finished The Protestant Ethic and the Spirit of Capitalism and the theory bit almost seemed too short and obvious after what had gone before. The first 2/3 - 3/4 of the book is him setting up the reader historically to understand the context of the point he makes in the last section. I also thought this was, well, maybe not quite life-changing, but it's hugely expanded my understanding of the context and concept of calling in life. Every time I picked it up I had some trouble focusing on the reading, but once I got into it again I was hooked. He has a very conversational tone, even in discussing theory, and seems very down-to-earth in a lot of ways. And now I'm thinking, 'here's that review!' since I felt like my thoughts were too amorphous previously to actually write a review for the book. :)


message 30: by Trice (new)

Trice Started City of God a little while ago, though didn't want to count it started until I was a ways in. It's different than I expected, but also smoother/easier reading than I expected... so far anyway - I've only read the 1st Book - there are 22 'books', each one averaging about 40 pages.

I'm alternating that with reading an article in Power Shift. Each article is written by different people, so the writing styles and readability vary greatly. This last one was full of abbreviations which ended up being rather annoying - it was interesting, but very definitely a quantitative study with lots of poorly labeled charts which didn't exactly aid in understanding as they should have. hoping for more in the next one.


message 31: by Trice (last edited Jan 02, 2013 06:51AM) (new)

Trice yeah, didn't really even come close to finishing this one. Still reading City of God and Power Shift: China and Asia's New Dynamics. The others that I didn't get to I've moved over to my 2013 list (On the Law of War and Peace, Natural Rights and the Right to Choose, The Secular City, The History of the Peloponnesian War). I tried to back off a bit on the new list so it's possible I'll actually finish it, and hopefully get some other heavy-duty reading done on the side, instead of the other way around. :)


message 32: by Bill (new)

Bill | 4629 comments Good luck in 2013.


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Books mentioned in this topic

Power Shift: China and Asia's New Dynamics (other topics)
Politics for Christians: Statecraft as Soulcraft (other topics)
The Protestant Ethic and the Spirit of Capitalism (other topics)
Martin Chuzzlewit (other topics)
Wild Swans: Three Daughters of China (other topics)
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Authors mentioned in this topic

Zbigniew Brzeziński (other topics)
Charles Dickens (other topics)
Hadley Arkes (other topics)
Duane Elmer (other topics)
Francis J. Beckwith (other topics)
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