The Mystery, Crime, and Thriller Group discussion

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Judy F | 7 comments Hello, I like to read good mysteries with a lot of plot twists and turns. I love mysteries that keep you guessing as to who did it. Could anyone please make some book recommendations for me? Thank you. Sincerely, Judy


message 2: by Hayes, Co-Moderator (new)

Hayes (Hayes13) | 2057 comments Mod
Hi Judy, I moved this to the appropriate place and deleted the other two threads (which were the same).

OK people... let's have the recommendations!


Whispers from the Pirate's Ghost Whisper (PirateGhost) I'm enjoying "The Hidden Oasis" by "Paul Sussman. It's pretty...twisted and involved.

If your lookiing more towards Crime Novels etc... you might like the Lee Childs "Jack Reacher" series. THe first one of those is "Killing Floor" And one of my favorites is Robert Crais "Joe Pike" series (which is really Elvis Cole #12). The first one is The Watchman. It's not as twisty and twiny as some but it's just a plain good read. If you like a little urban fantasy with your twisted mystery plots there's always Storm Frontby Jim Butcher. This is the famous "Dresden" series.

If none of those work...I've got more in mind that I liked. Just let me know and I'll keep recommending until I have either proven I'm an idiot or we find something you like.


message 4: by Donna, Co-Moderator (new)

Donna | 1973 comments Mod
Hi Judy, Do you like light cozies or dark police procedurals? Historic settings or exotic locations?


Judy F | 7 comments Hugh (A.K.A. Hermit the Curmudgeon) wrote: "I'm enjoying "The Hidden Oasis" by "Paul Sussman. It's pretty...twisted and involved.

If your lookiing more towards Crime Novels etc... you might like the Lee Chi..."


Thank you. I've never read cozies but I have heard good things about them. I like dark police procedurals and exotic locations.


Dorie (DorieAnn) | 463 comments I would recommend two fairly new series. They each have only 2 books to date, but they totally surprised me at the end.

Death Notice and Bad Moon by Todd Ritter.

Think of a Number and Shut Your Eyes Tight by John Verdon.


Jill Hutchinson (Bucs1960) | 8452 comments If you like dark police procedurals, try the Rebus books by Ian Rankin............they don't much darker that these twisting and turning mysteries.


Whispers from the Pirate's Ghost Whisper (PirateGhost) Judy wrote: "Hugh (A.K.A. Hermit the Curmudgeon) wrote: "I'm enjoying "The Hidden Oasis" by "Paul Sussman. It's pretty...twisted and involved.

If your lookiing more towards ..."


Cool, in that case, the Jack Daniels Series is pretty cool, the first one, Whiskey Sour by J.A. Konrath. He just wrote the last one of that series.

Probably even better than that is John Sanford's "Prey" Series. I love his Virgil Flower's Series (A spin off from the prey series) but that's not particularly dark. I can't remember what the first Prey series is, but I think it's... Rules of Prey. It's from that exotic land known as "Minnesota."

Robert Crais Elvis Cole, and Joe Pike stories can get pretty dark, but not so much twisted. I'm a Joe Pike fan! (Loved "The Watchman")

Lee Childs Jack Reacher character is a wonderful tough guy who also uses his brain every now and then. His first is darker than his second, and I haven't read the third yet.


message 9: by Britney (last edited Dec 18, 2011 02:21PM) (new)

Britney (tarheels) | 57 comments Dorie wrote: "I would recommend two fairly new series. They each have only 2 books to date, but they totally surprised me at the end.


book:Think of a Number] was a very good book. It does alot twists and turns. I read it only in a few days.

I just got done reading County Line by Bill Cameron. Its not a dark mystery nor does it take place in an exotic land, but is very good.



Whispers from the Pirate's Ghost Whisper (PirateGhost) And, I thought I'd mention a very good series (I enjoyed very much) The Patrick Bowers Files by Steven James. I mention it here, because the first book is now free for Kindle at Amazon.com

The first book is The Pawn. I don't know how dark and gritty it is, (hard for me to measure that scale for some reason) but it's good. (Plain and Simple).


Allison Brennan (abwrites) | 38 comments Hugh (A.K.A. Hermit the Curmudgeon) wrote: "And, I thought I'd mention a very good series (I enjoyed very much) The Patrick Bowers Files by Steven James. I mention it here, because the first book is now free for Kindle at Am..."

I read THE PAWN when I was judging best first book for the Thriller Awards and very much liked it. It's dark, but I didn't think it was all that gritty or overly violent -- definitely not over the top (but it's been a few years since I've read it.) I bought the next book, but haven't read it yet -- I met Steven at Thrillerfest and he's also a really nice guy.


Whispers from the Pirate's Ghost Whisper (PirateGhost) I've never met him but his bio says he was raised by his three daughters (I know that's not exactly what it said, but, I have one daughter and if she had any help that was just like her, that's how it'd be with me.) Apparently they raised him well.

I really liked the subtle healing theme he worked in to The Pawn. It's hard to work a spiritual message into a mainstream work of fiction without disrupting the entertainment value. When you can do it, it's a wonderful surprise.


Avisek Bandyopadhyay | 54 comments Folks, please choose me my next read. It can belong to paranormal, sci fi, mystery, true crime !!

Though on second thoughts, a paranormal thriller would be most welcome. And please let it be an aggressive, twisted and stunning plot.


Paul 'Pezski' Perry (Pezter) | 116 comments Hey Avisek

a couple of suggestions for you. Attack of the Unsinkable Rubber Ducks, a thriller by Christopher Brookmyre that really fits with the aggressive, twisted and stunning request.

I don't read a lot of paranormal stuff myself, but one of the best urban fantasy writers is Charles de Lint and I think Someplace To Be Flying will blow anyone away. Alternatively, Rupert Thomson's The Five Gates of Hell. I took a look at your profile and we have quite similar tastes on many things, so hopefully you'd enjoy all of these as much as I did.


Nigel Bird (nigelbird) | 53 comments 'Hypothermia' is well named. There’s something chilling about the investigations of Detective Erlendur that runs from the first page right through to the end.

This book was my introduction to Erlendur, and I found him to be rather engaging. To try and post reference points to the uninitiated, I feel that he combines elements of Maigret and Columbo; the thoughtful country-boy working tirelessly and skilfully in the big city combined with a terrier-like erosion of the people involved. Throw in the rational, obsessive mind with cold blood passing through the veins and you have a fictional detective of a very high calibre to enjoy.

Here's one of the skills he's learned over the years:

'The rule was always to accept coffee if it was offered...'

It's a tip he passes on to the younger detectives, a small measure as to their capacity to do the job:

'...Elinburg had been quick to learn this. Sigurdur Oli still hadn't grasped the concept.'

It's the kind of subtlety that helps to make a book worth reading.

'Hypothermia' opens with a suicide. It’s an open-and-shut conclusion as far as the police are concerned, yet Erlendur is uneasy with the case. He wants to know why the tragedy happened, needs to explore the story behind the death.

As he does unpeels layers, he uncovers ghosts. There are the ghosts in the mind of the victim, the haunting tones of a series of unsolved missing persons investigations from decades earlier and there’s the ever-present spectre of his dead brother.

Through visits trawling the stories of the past and the lakes of Iceland, after mystics are consulted and evidence unearthed, the plot-lines are sewn together skilfully so that they have a symbiotic relationship which offers a hugely satisfying read.

If I were to have a minor gripe, it would be to suggest that the translation does not always run smoothly. I can’t be sure on this as my Icelandic is non-existent, but I have a feeling that the translation requires one more light edit to present it at its best. It didn’t detract too much from the pleasure of my reading, but some paragraphs were a little wordy and slightly tangled when simpler language or use of a pronoun might just have streamlined things.

There's also a fair amount of one of my least favourite styles in the writing of speech, that of the ... to represent pauses or hesitancy. It's a small thing that possibly reflects natural conversation, but natural conversation and good written dialogue often bear little relation. Those three dots might have a place, but when they're overused they do irritate me.

Translation and dots aside, this is a tremendous read. The characters and plot are fully formed and each time I put the book down I started looking forward to the next instalment.

I'll definitely be getting to know Erlendur better in the future and I'm certainly recommending this to any fans of the police-procedural who enjoy a touch of class.


message 16: by [deleted user] (new)

This is a great category for a group! I love a good thriller


M.A. Comley (Melcom) | 51 comments The best book I've read so far this year is Linda Prather's Bet you can't... Find Me It's a wonderful mystery with a twist.

The cover was enough to intrigue me to take a look at the simple from there I was hooked.

Bet you can't... Find Me by Linda Prather


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The Mystery, Crime, and Thriller Group

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Books mentioned in this topic

Storm Front (other topics)
The Watchman (other topics)
Killing Floor (other topics)
The Hidden Oasis (other topics)
Shut Your Eyes Tight (other topics)
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Authors mentioned in this topic

Paul Sussman (other topics)
Todd Ritter (other topics)
John Verdon (other topics)
Ian Rankin (other topics)
J.A. Konrath (other topics)
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